Couple of probably "silly" questions

Discussion in 'Goats' started by desertoasisfarm, Jun 12, 2006.

  1. desertoasisfarm

    desertoasisfarm Active Member

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    I have a five day old buckling and doeling (mother is kinder father nigerian) so they are small. It has been in the triple digits here since they were born and the 100 degree+ temperatures are miserable!

    My question is the boy seems to pant constantly all day long, very visible and opened mouth. The girl does not (she is about 1/2 his size). Should I be concerned or do anything. Never had any babies born so late and when it's so hot I am worried. He's also not quite as advanced as the female just seems a little slower to do things not as"hyper" as she is jumping around and up on stumps, not as sure on his feet, etc.

    And the other question, does anyone know if it's OK to feed FRESH alfalfa, by that I mean cut straight from the field..not in bales. Not dry. My husband has access to a lot for free if he just cuts it, but I don't want to use it until I'm sure it's OK. :shrug:

    I've visited here so many times and usually my questions are answered just by reading the other posts.

    Thanks for any info.
     
  2. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    Make sure they have shade - newborns cannot regulate their body temperature as well. Are they getting enough fluid, ie milk, water? Sometimes there can be damage at birth, or a baby can be premature by way of explanation for the buckling's trouble. For example, a large baby may have gotten stuck - and deprived of oxygen.

    Do NOT feed fresh alfalfa. If you want to feed it - let it dry out a bit or wilt. Don't let it mold - spread it out to dry. Only feed a handful or so. Gradually work your way up to more - but keep baking soda available at all times. I've heard of dairy goat farmers cutting alfalfa for their goats, but I do think they let it wilt a bit - and they work their way up to such a 'rich' fresh feed.

    Niki
     

  3. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    if you feed it fresh and green DONOT give more than a few mouth fulls at a time, goats can handle it better than horses and cattle but they still need to be carful,
    best thing would be to cut a bunch of it and let it sun dry, then feed that to them, let it get past the wilt stage, but dont burn by leaving it out in the sun too long,
    other wise its GREAT for them
     
  4. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I just wanted to say "Welcome"!
     
  5. desertoasisfarm

    desertoasisfarm Active Member

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    Thanks so much to all for the replies. I just now got back in from delivering 2 more little bucks at around 5pm. (It was about 102 degrees out there!) The first one had such a hard time getting to nurse and I wasn't sure he got enough colostrum..the 2nd is a pig. Tried to bottle him but he won't suck that at all. He did get some from mom, just hope it was enough. Every one seems OK and settled in so I'll check one more time before bed. I don't think I'll ever breed again so late to have "summer" babies. Still have 3 more does to go.

    Again, thanks so much for the help.

    Linda
     
  6. rranch

    rranch Well-Known Member

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    Do not feed fresh green? My goats, Boer percentages and Pygmys all live on green pasture grass and densely wooded acreage full of blackberries and ferns and every other kind of green plant you could think of. My goats are in heaven here...They eat scotch broom and salem berries.
    I do keep alfalfa/grass mix available to them and give them some(not much)grain with minerials and selinium. But I also provide baking soda at all times.
    Maybe cuz they eat it year round here it's ok.
     
  7. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    Robin - my advice to not feed fresh green alfalfa has to do with the fact that her goats aren't accustomed to it yet. New foods need to be introduced slowly - to avoid bloating. Small amounts, and starting out semi-dried out - is a safe method of introducing fresh alfalfa. It sounds like, from her post, the goats have been eating something else, and that desertoasis had never fed fresh alfalfa before.

    Your goats are used to eating browse - and aren't likely to overeat it, so that's why they are okay. I have to be careful with mine - since they are on a dry lot. I give them tree trimmings, and shrub clippings - but I have to limit the amounts as they will overeat them, and bloat. So it isn't just alfalfa, but new foods. If they had them all the time - they'd probably moderate! I wonder if that would work with me and chocolate? ;)

    niki
     
  8. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think green alfalfa tends to make ruminants bloat anyway if they eat much at all. Browse and grassy pastures are fine as long as they are introduced to it slowly. But I'm not sure I'd feel comfortable grazing them on alfalfa even if it was introduced slowly......?? Maybe I'm thinking of something else, but I think I've read that several places. Anyone here actually graze goats on alfalfa fields???
     
  9. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We usually let our alfalfa hay cure for 30 days before feeding it because the nitrogen is too high in fresh alfalfa and the goats can bloat. We have some alfalfa growing in the yard, which the goats can eat when they are out browsing. They don't have a problem with that because most of the browse is grass and weeds and their main diet is cured hay. My friend's kids sometimes get through the fence and in the alfalfa field. Most do OK, but she has lost a few to bloat over the years.
     
  10. desertoasisfarm

    desertoasisfarm Active Member

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    Expecting temp of 105 degrees here so hoping the new babies won't overheat. They have shade ..housing and we've at least got a little wind here today, and the humidity is low.

    I'm taking it slow on the fresh alfalfa..just a bit here and there. It is actually drying very quickly because of this desert weather. But I don't need any problems considering everything else and three more does to go.

    Thank you guys so much...it's so nice to know there's others out there to help!

    Linda
     
  11. rranch

    rranch Well-Known Member

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    We don't grow alfalfa grass here, too wet I guess. We grow alot of local hay. It's used mostly used for cattle. Maybe our goaties can't get into trouble if they have fields to get into....Anyway. 105wow I was hoping to see the sky once this week.,let alone temps reaching 65. I guess I shouldn't complain I haven't had to water the garden yet. The goats on the other hand are living in mud.
     
  12. desertoasisfarm

    desertoasisfarm Active Member

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    Yeah, already 103 so it's gonna make the predicted 105 I guess. Just feel so bad for the babies, adults born and raised here so it doesn't faze them now. But I've never had newborns when it's sooo hot. The ones born yesterday are the panting ones now, the 6 day old has adjusted I guess, don't see him suffering so much today.

    Right now that 68 sounds real good altho I would be complaining in Feb if it were so "cold". :)

    Well off to check on eveyone. Thanks again!
     
  13. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    No more summer babies for me either!

    I was 107 here today and I have 3 does due between now and the next 2 weeks! They are in misery! I sure miss winter! That's when i like kids born! I need to revamp my breeding schedule, LOL!
     
  14. desertoasisfarm

    desertoasisfarm Active Member

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    Boy..107 degrees in Texas, that means high humidity also right? I know you gotta be miserable too! My breeding "schedule" was so altered because of the lack of available bucks in this area...took me that long to find a nigerian.. most everyone here raises meat goats and I wanted to go dairy and a bit smaller. But my poor girls and most of all, the babies are suffering.
    By Friday the prediction is a COOL 95. Hope my last 3 wait at least that long.

    I won't breed at all next year, wait until they run out of milk. But I've definitely learned my lesson on these late breedings.

    Never thought I think it was lucky to be in northern states as I usually hate the cold. :rolleyes: But we all just have to make do with the existing situation, right?
    Well gotta run its already 94 here so I better get as much done outside as I can.