Country living/cheap oil

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Beeman, Apr 8, 2005.

  1. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    We've enjoyed cheap oil for quite a while in this country. Much of the movement to the rural areas has been possible because of cheap oil. Many move way out and commute long distances so they can have their place in the country on weekends. They have also created the mini tractor market and the high dollar ride on lawnmower market. It has also created the dually pickup to pull my horse trailer market. Will the end or what looks like the end of cheap oil change this trend? Will it keep people closer to urban areas where commuting can be done cheaply?
     
  2. posifour11

    posifour11 Well-Known Member

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    my plan is biodeisel. as soon as i can get ahold of a cheap pickup to experiment with, i'll be on my way with almost free fuel (cross your fingers)
     

  3. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    Adjusted for inflation, oil is still about 40% cheaper than it was in 1980. BTW, it has dropped rapidly in the last few days. The price bubble has been pumped up by speculative "investiments."
     
  4. quadrants2

    quadrants2 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    im very interested in that posi....

    bio diesel sounds very interesting...just started looking into it.any help would be appreciated....doesnt willie nelson do alot with that stuff?

    thanks quad
     
  5. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    And GWB wants to put our SS dollars into the market,so they will have trillions more to manipulate the commodity futures with,plus the % the funds take each time they reallocate the money.

    Bad idea,putting our retirement out for the sharks to play with,it wont be for your benefit,even if the fund goes up,you pay out at the pump more,and the brokerage more for their 'management' fees.

    BooBoo
     
  6. patarini

    patarini Well-Known Member

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    WVO beats bio diesel any day of the week -- why do extra processing when its not needed? Remember the diesel was created to run on veggie oil!
     
  7. posifour11

    posifour11 Well-Known Member

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    i'm no expert on it myself but here are some websites i've been studying.
    yes, willie nelson owns a company that produces it, i believe.


    i agree with patarini, the oil can be used in its crude form with a little modificaion to the vehicle so the oil can be heated prior to use to thin it.


    http://journeytoforever.org/biodiesel.html


    http://www.biodieselnow.com/

    http://www.biodiesel.org/resources/fuelfactsheets/

    http://www.biodieselamerica.org/biosite/index.php?id=141,0,0,1,0,0
     
  8. Helena

    Helena Well-Known Member

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    I think something of the same topic was talked about in the Back Woods Magazine recently. I do believe that the cities will become more poplated again but where will all the people live. Guess they will just have to knock down or re-build the vacant buildings..what an idea ??!!! I don't really think the countryside will be a no-man's-land...but we can all hope !!
     
  9. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I heard that the per-barrel price is dropping, but that "they" actually expect the price at the pump to keep on going up. Not being a financial or speculative genius (I just know to buy land: they ain't makin' any more of it), I cannot figure this out.

    I also heard that people are still consuming the same amount of gasoline as before. Do you think TPTB are going to see how hard they can push it, using the level of consumption as a guide, and they won't back off until people start using less?

    Pony! (and yes, I'm paranoid, but it doesn't mean they're not out to get me!)
    ;)
     
  10. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    Beeman,

    To directly answer your question, I think the hardest hit areas will be the suburbs. People who have chosen to move far out are likely to be telecommuters or not commute at all.

    As shipping costs increase (for agricultural products) I think we will see changing patterns in what is grown and where. This is an excellent argument against current farm subsidies. I would love to see more money spent on R&D and less on things like price supports and crop loan programs.

    The market for small tractors may actually increase as smaller landowners look to make their property productive. I certainly wouldn't invest in lawn mower manufacturers looking forward. The whole suburban perfect lawn approach will be increasingly expensive to maintain.

    As usual, just my 2 cents.

    Mike
     
  11. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    I'd have to disagree about the suburbs. most suburbs are so close to cities they develop to the point of mass transportation and stores within walking/bicycle distance. I also have to disagree about the telecommuters in the country. just look at many of the people that have posted on this board. They have a job in the city that they commute long distances to for the wages to support their lifestyle and the benefits they need. I'm not saying there aren't telecommuters, but the majority have a job that requires their prescence like nurse, schoolteacher, factory worker, etc. I don't think you'll see a shift in what's grown where as it will always come down to a cost factor and shipping will still be cheaper then trying to rebuild the localized markets. Obviously for the enterprising there will be small time ag oppotunities for localized crops. but you're not going to grow many oranges in Michigan and your produce will still come from CA,FL and abroad. You will see a cost factor increase in more rural areas for shipping of necessary goods. It's much cheaper and cost effective to ship to the main stores in the cities instead of all of the outlying stores. This is what killed the small country stores as they couldn't buy goods at the same prices and then the companies wouldn't even deliver to them any more. They are in the process of closing a major chain supermarket in our town right now. The volume didn't justify the operating costs and I'm sure a part of the costs were the extra stop for their grocery truck without a full load because of lower volume.


    It actually is cheaper in many ways to live either in a city or very close by. With oil prices going up that may become more and more of a factor.
     
  12. DaleK

    DaleK Well-Known Member

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    I don't think it will change a lot. Most of the people buying those dually trucks and small tractors are doing it for the "status-symbol" effect anyway, money isn't an option. First thing anybody seems to do when moving out to an acreage is buy the $50,000 dually to pull a single-horse trailer - once - then drive it to and from work so that the others at work know they're "farmers" now, even though I rarely see anyone farming for a living anymore that drives anything bigger than a 3/4 ton. That includes the full-time livestock haulers, hauling 28' goosenecks with 3/4 ton diesels and single rear wheels. Here, with 80 cows milking and 190 head total, 900 acres of crops and 300 of woodlot, all we ever need is a 1/2 ton 2WD with a V6.