Could it have been "Slobbers"

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by cindyloo, Dec 5, 2004.

  1. cindyloo

    cindyloo Member

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    Nov 13, 2004
    Location:
    Texas
    Does anyone know anything about Slobbers? I found a picture in a health book for rabbits that looked similar and listed similar symptoms to the problem I was having with that kit last week. The problems began after weaning them from the moms. Also, I can't seem to get past the fact that we never saw a sneeze or anything coming from the nose. The internet hasn't been much help. I know I should maybe let this go, but I want to figure out a way to prevent it from happening again.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Pat Lamar

    Pat Lamar Well-Known Member Supporter

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    "Slobbers" can be caused by several factors, such as tooth abscess or feeding contaminated hay or straw. Correction of the primary problem will solve the problem.

    Pat Lamar
    President
    Professional Rabbit Meat Association
    http://www.prma.org/
    Chairperson, 2005 ARBA Commercial Dept. Committee
     

  3. jensue

    jensue Member

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    Nov 8, 2004
    Location:
    TX
    I haven't had this happen to our herd as of yet. And I hope it doesn't. What did you do to remedy this? Did you isolate this bunny from the rest of the herd? Our county fair breed date is coming up soon........should we be treating with any kind of antibiotics or disinfecting the entire barn?

    Thank in advance

    Jen
     
  4. Pat Lamar

    Pat Lamar Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Neither tooth abscesses or using contaminated hay or straw is "contagious," so there is no need to isolate. These are not "diseases," per se, although disease and mortalities can happen if you continue to feed contaminated feed stuffs. Removal of the hay or straw should solve the problem. If it is a tooth problem, either have the tooth (or teeth) removed or cull the rabbit(s).

    If your rabbits are healthy, then, why fix what ain't broke? No need for antibiotics. It's *after* the fair that you need to pay attention and possibly quarantine the fair rabbits, as they can pick up diseases from sick rabbits at the fair. A period of two weeks is recommended before adding them to the rest of your herd.

    Pat Lamar
    President
    Professional Rabbit Meat Association
    http://www.prma.org/
    Chairperson, 2005 ARBA Commercial Department Committee
     
  5. cindyloo

    cindyloo Member

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    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2004
    Location:
    Texas
    I don't feed hay to any of my young (less than 4-6 months). It could have possibly been a tooth problem I honestly didn't look. We isolated the rabbit as soon as I realized he was having problems and we culled when I realized he had gone off his feed and was having labored breathing. I didn't really have time to care for a sick rabbit and I was thinking only of the rest of my herd, not knowing what exactly he had. It was only afterwards that I considered "slobbers". I have not found that there is a cure for "slobbers"

    I do "feel" that it is more likely that we had some contaminated feed in the sense that it got contaminated in the feed trough. (We buy very fresh feed and the rest of the litters are on the same feed). I am not sure if maybe the feeder didn't get cleaned well and some feed grew mold or maybe the kits contaminated the feed themselves. I also changed their feed during that time to a lower protien and maybe the change was too quick. Needless to say we will be more carefull with feeders and feed in the future. Sorry for the long reply.

    Cindy