Cottage Slab Poured!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by highlands, Nov 7, 2006.

  1. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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    Today we poured the slab, east wall and south wall section of our new tiny cottage. A cement truck is a specialized driveway compactor and it does a great job!

    The pour quite went well. All the forms are insulated, it is insulated below the slab and there is now 2" of insulation on top of it plus hay in nooks and crannies. This should keep the concrete warm for the next week while it does the initial cure. We plan to leave the insulation on after that for as long as possible as we do the masonry and then the FC barrel vault.

    This is 1/2" (#4) RC plus 661010WWM and 1 lb of PVA RSC15 per cu-yd, 3% PolarSet, hot water and 0" slump concrete. It sets VERY fast! It takes a lot of working but that stiff mix is supposed to be the best way to go in a cold weather pour from what I read. In the future I think I would cut the slump to 3" for better flow and workability.

    Total time today was about about 2 hours for pour and smoothing with four people (Thank you Charles, Will, Holly and also Ben for taking care of Hope!) plus the concrete company (Griswold) delivery driver controlling the truck.

    There is a photo at http://SugarMtnFarm.com/blog/

    More details to follow after I decompress. :)

    49°F/33°F Sunny, Full Moon

    Cheers,

    Walter Jeffries
    Sugar Mountain Farm
    Orange, Vermont
    Pastured Pigs & Sheep
     
  2. Jan Doling

    Jan Doling Well-Known Member

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    Each step is exciting, isn't it?!
     

  3. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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  4. 3dogmom

    3dogmom Well-Known Member

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    Congrats Highland!! You're making great progress. I bookmarked your page so I can go back and read it.
     
  5. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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    More progress on our on tiny cottage.

    http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog
    http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2006/11/channel-blocks-up.html
    http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2006/11/pigs-in-mist.html
    http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2006/11/mystery-photo-cores-poured.html
    http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2006/11/lower-walls-up.html
    http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2006/11/first-blocks.html

    If the weather holds we'll be up to the high bond beam at the top of the wall and doing the barrel vault ferrocement roof soon. That will close us in.

    Cheers,

    Walter Jeffries
    Sugar Mountain Farm
    Orange, Vermont
    Pastured Pigs & Sheep
     
  6. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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    We've finished the walls and are letting them cure as we work on building the trusses to support the WWM form work for our ferrocement barrel vault (a-la-MXSteve).

    http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2006/11/taming-trusses.html

    Hopefully on Wednesday or Thursday we'll be doing the roof vault so we can insulate it before the cold weather hits.

    More tiny cottage building articles at:

    http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2006_11_01_sugarmtnfarm_archive.html

    Cheers,

    Walter Jeffries
    Sugar Mountain Farm
    Orange, Vermont
    Pastured Pigs & Sheep
     
  7. Boleyz

    Boleyz Prognosticator, Artist

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    Here's what it looked like when we poured our slab for our new house:

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Boleyz

    Boleyz Prognosticator, Artist

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    This one should have come before the cement pour image...

    [​IMG]
     
  9. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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  10. tallpaul

    tallpaul Well-Known Member

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    Ok- I think I know what ya have but what is a barrell vault? what is the advantage to it? Looks good so far....
     
  11. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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    TallPaul, Check out this web site:

    http://www.geocities.com/flyingconcrete/

    The author, MXSteve, has some excellent articles about concrete construction and barrel vaults.

    In a nutshell, a barrel vault is a arch. Imagine taking a barrel, lying it down on its side and using the upper 50%. That creates a vault. This can then be propped up on knee walls or higher walls so that it becomes a roof. See one of my drawings in this article:

    http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2006/11/taming-trusses.html

    and here is a picture:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. computerchick

    computerchick Keeper of the Zoo

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    Walter,

    As always you are an inspiration :) I'm watching carefully as we'll have to do the same type thing for our barn/shop next year!


    Andrea
     
  13. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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    Yesterday we got the roof on our tiny cottage so we are finally closed in! it was an exciting moment with great cheering from the crowds and workers as the last dabs of concrete covered the final hole in the roof. Building our own house has been, and continues to be, a great homeschooling experience.

    Pictures at:

    http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2006/12/first-layer-of-roof-on.html

    We still have the second layer to do, but the cottage is now closed in and already retaining heat better than with just the covering of plastic.

    Today we take off from construction and take a pig to market.

    Cheers,

    Walter Jeffries
    Sugar Mountain Farm
    Orange, Vermont
    Pastured Pigs & Sheep
    http://SugarMtnFarm.com/blog
    http://HollyGraphicArt.com
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  14. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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    Our tiny cottage here on Sugar Mountain in Vermont is 252 sq-ft. I've been chronicling the building of it at my blog http://SugarMtnFarm.com/blog - it is a work in progress. Here's some recent photos:

    Back at sunset:
    [​IMG]
    In the background you can see our old farm house (circ. 1777 to 1825?) which we'll either use for agriculture or sell (buyer must move it) after we've moved into the new house.

    Front:
    [​IMG]
    In the background of this shot is the kids' treehouse and behind that is Sugar Mountain.

    The door which I just installed today:
    [​IMG]
    Modeled by my son Ben and wife Holly.

    Today I finished the door. Our next step is to get the outer section of the windows in which will make us 'air-tight'. Then the attic and loft which will both be poured in forms concrete and ferro-cement. Somewhere in-between I need to build a new pig shed. Busy as bees in July...

    Cheers,

    -Walter
    Sugar Mountain Farm
    Pastured Pigs & Sheep
     
  15. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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  16. grannygardner

    grannygardner Well-Known Member

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    I saved the drawing of your house on my computer and hope to be able to build something very similar next year. Those windows are quite a bargain at $5 each. Wish we could come across a deal such as that.
     
  17. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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  18. desertrat - 1

    desertrat - 1 Well-Known Member

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    Very nice pictures and information .

    How much did it cost per square foot to have your slab done from start to finish if you farmed out the whole job ?

    I'm curious ... I am putting up a metal building 40X50 and the slab only is quoted in the neighborhood of up to $10,000 which works out to $5 a foot . Thats with 4'' floor and 18'' x12'' footing , all materials including some leveling and substate gravel , rebar etc. Seems like a lot , I could do some of it myself to save some money .... I hate spending that kind of money , but then again its nice to just point and say do it . Couple weeks and you can start erecting the building . :shrug: Not sure how I'm going to go about it yet .

    Whats your sq ft costs in your area ? I'm out west in AZ .

    DR-1
     
  19. veme

    veme Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Walter - :)
    I read Holly's post last night. It was interesting to consider the cottage project from a woman's point of view.
    I agree with Holly that visual space is more important than actual square foot space. If I was going to build a house or cottage I would consider an open plan.
    Holly is very wise to lighten up on “stuff”. I did the same thing and it really make a difference in my house work and happiness. There is only so much “stuff” people really need.

    I think it was Thich Nhat Hanh who said:

    You can get to the end of less, but never get to the end of more.

    Good Luck & Continued success.

    veme
     
  20. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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    I don't know because we do all the labor ourselves. I have my own backhoe bucketloader.

    It cost $900 and change for the concrete for the slab and one and a half half walls. That's 27 linear feet of 32" high wall plus a 14'6"x20'6" slab about 4" thick plus built in footers. If you figured that out per square foot maybe it would be about $2.70 per square foot for just the concrete. (no forms, labor, etc)

    The cement blocks cost about $1,000.

    Big windows cost $60 (I got them on salvage for $5 each) and the small openable windows cost $300 each. The door cost $150 as a second that someone had custom ordered and not taken.

    We've spend around $1,000 more beyond that for portland cement in bags, rebar, WWM, lath and other stuff.

    Total cost for materials to date is around $3,700.

    See:

    http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2006_11_01_sugarmtnfarm_archive.html

    where the posts start about the pouring and beyond.

    That fits. You're paying for forms and labor and such as well as the materials.

    I'm not sure what you're asking. Do you mean an average square foot cost to build? I would think the square foot cost would vary greatly with what you're doing for a house. I don't know what the costs are typically. Sorry.