Cost of 10 inch schedule 40 PVC pipe?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Windy in Kansas, Nov 11, 2006.

  1. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Another post spoke of light tubes, those light gathering tubes that run from roof to home interior. That started me to thinking about making some rather than spending $150 or so for each of them.

    Does anyone know what 10 inch schedule 40 PVC pipe might sell for? I can't seem to use the right search on the NET to find a price and don't want to wait until Monday to toy further with the idea.

    My thoughts are to size a portion for length, spray the interior of it with spray adhesive or other, then use reflective mylar rolled onto a dowel to apply it to the inside of the tube.

    It shouldn't take much thought to figure out a diffuser for the interior, but might take a bit more thought for a light gathering dome on the rooftop.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. dennisjp

    dennisjp dennisjp

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    I'm not sure what the cost is, but for what you are doing, I would use the lower pressure pipe than the schedule 40 pipe. They sell some that is less than half the thickness and I know it will be cheaper and it will get the same job done.
    When you go to schedule 40, the cost goes up. JMHO.
    Good luck
    Dennis
     

  3. PyroDon

    PyroDon Well-Known Member

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    cheaper to go to a local sheetmetal fabricator and have them roll you some thin wall stainless steel pipe
     
  4. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    Dennis, I thought sch 40 was the thinnest/cheapest. I've only used sch 40 and sch 80. I've checked my local lumber yards and the cheapest they have is the sch 40. What is the thinner one and where would I go to find it?
     
  5. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    PyroDon the material difference between PVC and SS might just be enough to keep condensation from forming if enough temperature gets through the lower diffuser. I'm not sure if that is ever a problem or not. I would figure on having insulation around the outside of any inside the structure.

    I know thinner PVC is made, but would expect it might be a special order at additional cost vs. available local purchase of schedule 40.

    If I remember correctly schedule 40 is the thinner of it and 80.
     
  6. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Check with an irrigation pipe supplier for that large of diameter.
     
  7. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    See what round cardboard concrete forms cost.
     
  8. shadowwalker

    shadowwalker Well-Known Member

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    Could you use that pipe that they use for heating and air conditioning? I been thinking of using that.
     
  9. dennisjp

    dennisjp dennisjp

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    I have used schedule 40 in several materals. I am hoping to sell fireplace blower units using 2" sch. 40 pipe.
    I am not sure what the difference is, or how they rate a pipe sch. 40 but I know both metal and plastic, sch. 40 is a thicker version of a thinner version of pipe, if that makes any sense.
    Let me try it again. For my blowers, as I said, I use the sch. 40.
    All other blowers that I have found uses a pipe that if is not, does compare to the thickness of an exchaust pipe for an automobile and they burn out in a couple or not more than a few years.
    I choise to use sch. 40 because it is thicker.
    If I am right, and if not, someone please explain it to me better than I can, sc. 80 is twice the thickness as sch. 40 is, and nearly all pipe that is less than 40, is less than 1/2 the thickness of it.
    I think that is right but don't bet the farm on it.
    Ok, I just went down to the shop. I have some 2" sch. 40 PVC. It has a rating of 330 PSI at 73 deg.
    I also have some 2" that is thinner that has a rating of 180 LBS but that is all it says on it.
    I didn't have a tape on me, but I am good at guessimating sizes of things.
    The 40 is about 3/16" and the thin wall pipe is about 3/32".
    Now some of you may say no one can eyeball something that small and be right, but keep in mind, I have welded, on and off, for the last 35 years or so.
    I don't get confused until I get down to the 1/16 and 5/64 inch rods. 3/32 and above I see them as they are. Same with any other thinkness.

    Don, you can buy a 5' piece of pipe and I think that would be enough for most cases, and 10' piece would surely be, and IMHO, a sheet metal shop would charge you alot more.

    But Don, On the other hand, if you bought the metal and took it home before getting it rolled, you could polish it to a mirror finish and that could very well be the best way to go. It isn't that hard with compound and an electric polisher. Dang good idea, Don.
    Sense you said that, you acn also buy s.s stove pipe, which is ready to connect into the circle but you could polish it before hand also.
    You had to get my stupid brian in gear tonight, didn't you. LOL.

    I think that would be the best idea, WiK. Call the places that sell wood stoves and see about a stainless pipe and polish it.

    Good Luck and God Bless
    Dennis
     
  10. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Ed, the tubes project through the roof and are exposed to the elements of rain, snow, etc. I'm not sure how the forms would stand up to the weather even if painted. I would also wonder about how to join sections of them together to extend length where needed.

    shadowwalker I'm simply not familiar with what I assume would be large diameter ductwork.

    Explorer, hadn't thought of irrigation drillers and suppliers, thanks.
     
  11. dennisjp

    dennisjp dennisjp

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    I can stop thinking about things, once they get into my mind, so here we go once more and I will leave you all alone.

    Dons idea of Stainless steel is super. However, I am not sure aluminum wouldn't make a better mirror, which is what you are trying to make, in a sense.
    I really don't know about this, so some one pitch in and say what you think.
    The reason I came back, is some different advice.

    You can seal dang near anything with silicone chaulking. They use it to make fish tanks to seal the joints between the glass.
    Seal the bottom of it with your glass very good.
    If there is any way possible, find a welder that either tig, or mig welds metal, and talk some one into bringing a tank of arigon ( I am not sure if that is the correct spelling or not, but it has to be an inert gas) gas up there on the roof with you.
    Seal the top of it on a very calm day. The gas is heavier than air and will fill the "container for the lack of a better word", .before you seal the top of it.
    Run a small tube into it for the gas to flow through and put the top piece of glass on it. Chaulk it all, all the way to the hose. Let the hose run with a couple of inches for a few minuts and pull the hose out and get it sealed as fast as possible.
    Try not to allow any outside air to get into it as it will have the smallest amount of moisture in it and the walls will sweat.
    That's my best idea of doing it. Please let us know how it works.
    Dennis
     
  12. charles burns

    charles burns Well-Known Member

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    'Thin wall' PVC pipe is SDR PVC pipe.

    The rigid, thin wall, white PVC pipe you would typically run for a lawn sprinkler system is SDR PVC schedule 13.5 in sizes around 3/4 or 1" outside diameter.

    For 10" outside diameter SDR PVC pipe I think the minimum schedule was 21 or something.

    Try http://www.harvel.com/pipepvc-sdr-dim.asp

    I don't think they list prices but you can find some sizes and applications information. I know they do SDR large diameter - you might have to call them for a price though.
     
  13. Pouncer

    Pouncer Well-Known Member

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    I sell draingage pipe every day.

    Let me describe some of the basic differences.

    Sch 80 PVC pipe is the heavy wall gray pipe. It is used a lot by electricians.

    Sch 40 PVC pipe is typically white. It has half the strength of the Sch 80. Yes you can find it up to 10 inch diameter, but it is pretty spendy! The largest that is carried locally is six inch. Other sizes have to be special ordered in-check online for information from a plumbing supply house such as Fergusons' (they are nationwide) or Keller Supply.

    There is also CPVC. This is a thinner wall...thinner than 3034 PVC. CPVC is the stuff that you can readily bend by hand in the smaller diameters.

    ALL plastic piping can be glued (joined) using a variety of fittings. The larger diameter piping has fewer options for fittings. The schedule 40 PVC pipe is rated for a certain amount of pressure....similar but not as strong as HDPE. High Density Poly Ethylene is the black piping that comes in 100 foot long coils. Extremely light, and flexible but fittings are more difficult.

    Hope that helps some. Could you use a length of galvanized culvert?
     
  14. The Paw

    The Paw Well-Known Member

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    I have seen the cardboard concrete forms in 8" and 10' lengths, which should be plenty. If you are putting on a skin of reflective stainless on the inside, why couldn't you skin the portion of the outside that juts above the roof? I bet you could use flashing for stovepipe at the roofline....