Corrientes, anyone? in with lambs

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by kirsten, May 27, 2006.

  1. kirsten

    kirsten Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone on here have corrientes?
    We have one corriente calf which we got from my father in law who says that all his are quite mean. Ours is sort of crippled but he is kind of a trouble maker in with our lambs. He rips their ear tags out becuase he thinks the little ears are teats? And then he is a weird guy, not a very traditional bottle calf at all since we always have to chase him down and corner him to feed him his bottle. My husband says he is just bred to run, of course, this one has no rodeo future... But he also runs over my lambs too but loves them to death at the same time. He is our only cow so he has joined the flock. Just wondering if anyone else has corrientes and if they found them to be trouble to raise too and maybe what we can expect. I think we are going to band him this week. He is about ten weeks old or maybe a little more. We are going to eat him. have any of you fed out a corriente? I think it is hard to do! They are like long horns. kirsten
     
  2. animalfarmer

    animalfarmer Well-Known Member

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    Just my opinion ,but why bother? When he gets to be a few weeks older,or if he is in good flesh now at ten weeks I would slaughter him and dress him out for range veal.Then I would find a nice calm calf to raise for your beef.Not a hard and fast rule but a calf that is difficult in youth,can be dangerous to you and your family later on.Just judging from your discription it sounds like he needs to be hung up,and then enjoyed on your grill.Regards,John
     

  3. kirsten

    kirsten Well-Known Member

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    Well, becuase he is not fleshed out at all. He is extremely skinny. He had a bad start in life, he got kicked, developed joint ill/septicemia and had his other back leg fuse into his hip socket. He has overcome the joint illl and even his fused hip is unfusing but all these troubles besides being a bottle calf and being transported, haven't made him anywhere near fat. Worse is that I hate to separate him from the lambs becuase he gets too lonely and refuses to eat calf food becuase the lambs aren't eating it... Hmm... I guess i am hoping that when he gets older, he won't stay glued to the sheep but stay out to pasture... Our sheep sleep in the barn every night, might need to change that some...Thanks, I'll start thinking about that some more. maybe we will buy more cows? kirsten
     
  4. animalfarmer

    animalfarmer Well-Known Member

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    Kirsten,I have sent you a P.M.-More info.Regards,John.
     
  5. lvshrs

    lvshrs Well-Known Member

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    Hi Kristen!

    Corrientes are not really good eating from what I have heard...They are bred for the rodeo events that use cattle (roping etc.) So they don't really flesh out like a regular calf...I would recommend castrating him now,seperating him in a much smaller pen (so you don't chase what meat he has off)and from your flock before he really hurts one, and feeding the heck out of him for another month or two to get as much weight as possible(probably won't be much), then slaughter. This was what I was told by a someone I know who has done the same thing-had a friend give him two orphans that were injured by some dogs that were not able to recover enough to be used in the roping arena. He said he had it made into hamburger, stew meat and fajita meat(strip steak I think is what they call that cut) also said that it needed alot of tenderizing. :shrug: Hope this helps!
     
  6. mamahen

    mamahen Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I found this info, hope it helps:

    The Corriente Cattle are one of the first breeds to have been imported to the New World. The Texas Longhorn is actually a descendent and cousin of the Corriente. Corriente Cattle are being used today primarily as rodeo cattle because they are so quick and agile. Even with the appearance of the Spanish and Mexican fighting bulls these cattle are docile and fairly easy to handle. The Corriente are particularly hardy, heat resistant, and not susceptible to diseases. Corriente Cattle are aggressive grazers and can survive on feed that most cattle might pass up.

    Small framed, Corriente bulls average about 1,000 pounds and cows are about 750 pounds. They are short and small with fairly large horns that have large bases. Corriente Cattle do come in a variety of colors however solid colors are encouraged by breeders and associations. Brought to the New World by Spanish explorers in 1493, the Corriente breed of cattle is descended from a type of Spanish cattle. The cattle spread throughout the American southwest and up through California, as well as down through Central and South America. They are of Criollo type and have also been called Criollo or Chinampo Cattle, the words referring to common cattle. Corriente Cattle have long been thought of as being the best fit for rodeo purposes. In recent times the cattle have been crossed with European breeds of cattle to enhance their beef producing abilities. Isolated herds of full-breed cattle have been preserved throughout Central and South America and in many United States ranches.

    Corriente Cattle are traditionally used for bull dogging and roping in rodeos. They rarely have horn or foot problems and are extremely hardy. They are able to subsist on little food and can survive under little care. With a thick horn base and a light bone structure, these athletic cattle have no comparison when put into Rodeo sporting events.

    Corriente Cattle have easy calving and can continue to be fertile even under extreme climatic conditions. Corriente bulls are great to serve heifers in their first calving. Corriente calves weigh around 35 pounds at birth and are extremely hardy. The offsprings' size, agility, and health have turned many traditional beef ranches into producers of quality Corriente cattle.
     
  7. kirsten

    kirsten Well-Known Member

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    Thank you. They sound good except! that they aren't good eating! Hmmm... well, beggars can't be choosers and the calf was free.