Cornmeal analysis?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by JeffNY, Mar 12, 2005.

  1. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Anyone know the average readings from cornmeal? Curious about the MCAL, etc etc that cornmeal has. Can't find any usefull info online, nothing showing a basic analysis. Mainly looking for averages..


    Thanks.



    Jeff
     
  2. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Cal 0.01
    Phos 0.14
    Iron 0.002
    Copper 0.4

    That what you want?
     

  3. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Theres an out of print book most liabraries still have Morrisons Feed and Feeding it has tables on almost every type of grain .
     
  4. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Thats where I got it. The 'Bible' of feeding.
     
  5. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    I wasn't going to go there, but....

    isn't this what you are feeding to your cattle? Shouldn't you know the feed value of the feed you are using BEFORE you decide to start using it?

    The only thing I could find regarding cornmeal as a feed, referred to swine and placed in the neighborhood of oats as far as feed value. High in roughage, low in energy.

    Jena
     
  6. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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  7. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    I am very familiar with tables of feed values. I don't see cornmeal on this one though. What are you calling cornmeal? Is it really cornmeal or ground shell corn?

    Do you know how to use one of these tables? I'm not that good at it, just focus on DM%, TDN and CP, but that's good enough for what I do. I also check Ca and P with a handy little program I downloaded from somewhere....OSU, I think.

    For dairy, you need a much better understanding of the different values and how to use them.

    You should also get your forages tested as they can vary considerably from what a table says. I test my silage a few times a year, just to be sure. It usually comes out ahead of the tables...more protein anyways. I don't test hay as I already know it's crappy hay...mature fescue with a good bit of roses and other junk in it.

    Jena
     
  8. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Umm, that is cornmeal. Corn meal is ground corn, it certainly isn't high moisture. Here is the definition for cornmeal.


    Coarsely ground corn. Nowadays, the corn is ground after removing the hull and germ. Although this lowers its vitamin A content, this formula keeps better because of its lower fat content.

    Not sure if they do the same for cows, from what I see with some missed, it's not. But on that site it does say "Corn, Shelled, Ground". The next one below is Corn, HM Shelled which is Corn, High moisture shelled.

    "Corn gluten is a by-product of wet milling process to make cornstarch"

    The others are obvious, such as ear, cobs etc. Maybe someone else can confirm, but that has to be cornmeal. Afterall cornmeal is corn kernals that is ground up.

    I'll be seeing the guy who we buy cornmeal and other grains from, i'll show him, see what his take is on it.

    But this is not for the purpose of what is to be fed, curious about it BECAUSE there is information for oats, and other stuff. Any chart shows ground corn, vs "cornmeal". Besides, it's good to know when figuring Nem MCAL, NEG MCAL and NEL. However NEL seems to be used for lactating animals, while NEG and NEM are used for growing animals, and lactating. However NEL is used in any example used for figuring how much grain you need to feed, while NEM is used to figure the aditional energy needed for maintainence. After doing calculations, I see why people like to milk (those who milk for 9-10months, off for 2-3) mostly during the times when you can pasture, mostly due to the higher energy offered.



    Jeff
     
  9. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    Well, soybean meal is not simply ground soybeans. It's feed value varies significantly than whole soybeans.

    You need to know exactly what you are feeding before you can figure the ration. If they are removing parts of the grain before grinding, it will vary (maybe significantly) from ground whole corn. You can't just decide that what you are feeding must be ground corn, simply because it's the best fit on the list!

    Here is a site that discusses some of the different corn by-products used as feed. It refers to swine, but it might give you an idea of what you are actually feeding. It's a long page, do a search for "cornmeal" and you'll get to that section.

    http://www.genome.iastate.edu/edu/PIH/108.html

    Make sure you find out exactly what it is and also ask the guy if he has a feed value analysis of it. If not, and it is truly is "cornmeal"...I'd send some in to get tested so you have accurate numbers to figure your rations. Testing is cheap, having the wrong ration can cost you a fortune.

    Jena
     
  10. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Well, looks like it will be faster to wait till Wednesday and ask him. Not getting anywhere, for an overall energy for cornmeal.


    Jeff
     
  11. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Found out that Corn, that is shelled and ground is cornmeal. So that info on that site, pertaining to the corn, shelled, ground is cornmeal! :).


    Corn, shelled, ground 10 50 50 12 3 9 75 88 Milk.92 Gain.64 4.3 1.6 .02 .31 55

    That..



    Jeff