corn stoves

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by dugan, Sep 7, 2005.

  1. dugan

    dugan Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone here use corn stoves? Looking at amaizablaze 2100.
     
  2. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Corn stoves have been a frequent topic. Just go to search and then use corn stoves as the keywords on a title search.
     

  3. dugan

    dugan Well-Known Member

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    Not much there ken would like to hear from other people.
     
  4. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You need to shut down every few days & clean out the clinker. Some newer designs are much handier at this than some of the older designs. Most handle wood pellets as well, and adding calcium (chicken item like oyster shell) I think helps a bit with the clinker deal.

    --->Paul
     
  5. dugan

    dugan Well-Known Member

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    Used my corn stove last night at 3 it was 42 out with 20 m ph wind ,had to turn down to 2 kept 1200 sq ft a cozy 70,a little warmer in the room its setting in.Works great so far.
     
  6. dlangland

    dlangland dlangland

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    I have a friend in South Dakota that has had one for a few years and just loves it. I want one.
     
  7. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    The newer ones are supposedly better. Don't have the clinker problem. Some even have battery backup that trickle charges while it is running, and switches to battery if the power goes out!

    I saw that Northern Tool company has one in their catalog for $1999 or something like that. More expense than most places I've seen. But it doesn't use a chimney?????? Totally free-standing?

    Are ALL corn stoves that way?? You'd think you'd need a chimney.
     
  8. skeetshooter

    skeetshooter Well-Known Member

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    I put in the Amaizablaze 7100 just before the final two week cold snap this spring. I put mine in the basement and just hooked it up to the ducts. This thing is heating my basement and about 1300 sq ft upstairs. On the lowest setting #1 (1-10) my living room upstairs was about 76 degrees. I chose this model specifically because my basement has sections in it and the heat does not migrate upstairs well. I made a couple of calls to the manufacturer and they were most helpful in providing information. This 7100 is a bit of overkill for my size house. (I heat the basement too as my sewing machine, computer and reloading equipment are there)

    The company also made a "corn cleaner" that sets on their models to keep the junk out of the auger.

    I'd also like to take a moment to thank whoever mentioned using a battery backup. I did some calling to one of the mentioned websites and the guy filled me in on the details. I'll be getting my invertor next week.

    My parents bought one as well and even the miller I buy my corn from was sold on the deal. He refers to his as "the blessing".

    One nice thing about the corn stove is that the smoke isn't bothering my allergies. Wood is out of the question for me in the house. What little you get from opening the door to remove the clinker seems to be okay for me. And the outdoors smells like popcorn.

    Cherri
    "Supporting America's farmers one kernal at a time"
     
  9. skeetshooter

    skeetshooter Well-Known Member

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    speaking of the chimney - It looks like a 3-4" black metal pipe that goes straight out the wall. Had I been able to move the 300 pound thing down the stairs, I would have hooked it up myself.

     
  10. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I may look into getting one next year. I'm on propane now.

    If I can find one that I can get to work with my existing forced air ductwork and one that is relatively maintenance free so I don't have to mess with it constantly I may pull the trigger. Something where I can load up a hopper full of corn and have it run for weeks without having to mess with it.

    I usually grow corn on my farm so it would cost next to nothing for me especially given what a bushel of corn sells for these day.
     
  11. sajara

    sajara New Member

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    I am in the market for a corn stove. I am trying to figure out whether a free-standing unit will heat my 1200 sq ft home, upstairs and downstairs, without it being unbearably hot in the room the stove is in (most likely the living room). If I go with the furnace-type system, are they hard to install?

    Also, anyone with any recommendations as to specific units, feel free to chime in! I really don't know how to go about choosing one. What should I look for? Thanks!
     
  12. skeetshooter

    skeetshooter Well-Known Member

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    I would have attempted to install mine myself except I don't have a way to move the 300 beast into the basement (husband has some shoulder problems). Mine can either be a freestanding or hook into the existing ductwork. I chose it so that I could heat my basement and main floor (ranch style home). Its 70,000 btu and I'm hoping for slightly colder weather here shortly - I'm nearly a medium well now!
     
  13. Arisshill

    Arisshill Member

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    I purchased an Auburn from St. Criox this spring. http://www.eventempinc.com/stcroix/stoves/stoves.html

    Works like a charm. It's a direct vent 3" exhaust pipe. I installed it in the basement using a stainless steel liner in an existing chimeny. Because of an exhaust run longer than 10 feet, I used 4" stainless pipe and an adapter (per instal instructions with the stove).

    The basment room heat up nicely and the heat heat circulates through the rest of the house from a cold air intake in the ceiling in that room.

    It has a 90lb hopper for the corn and on high use during the winter, I 've been told by the friend up the road to expect to add about 5 gal of corn each day and drop the clinker once a day as well.

    So far this year I haven't burned 5 gallon a day (not cold enough yet), but the clinker is easy to drop. 2 minutes and your done. The fire keeps burning when you drop the clink, and all that is required is a handful of wood pellets to get the remaining embers going.
     
  14. sajara

    sajara New Member

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    Ended up going w/the furnace vs. the free-standing; was a bear to get down into the basement, but after ripping the drywall out on both sides of the stairs, we got it down there.

    My house is soooo much warmer than it was with gas, and I'm really happy with the furnace so far. Not to mention I'm psyched that I will no longer be paying a gas bill. :clap:

    I was wondering, though, if perhaps my settings aren't done correctly -- there are so many clinkers dropping out of the pot down into the clinker drawer that I have to clean out the drawer every day. I thought I had read that they were a lot more efficient than that. Any tips?
     
  15. TerryJ

    TerryJ Well-Known Member

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    Try oyster shells that you would feed chickens. We will have a corn furnace by next heating season.