corn crib volume

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by lj, Feb 2, 2004.

  1. lj

    lj Well-Known Member

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    I am planning to construct a small corn crib this summer. I need to know how the volume of shelled corn relates to the volume of corn still on the cob. How many bushels of picked corn ( still on the cob ) does it take to yeild a bushel of shelled corn? How many cubic feet is a bushel of shelled corn. ? It would seem that if I knew how many cubic feet of corn there was in a bushel of shelled corn. and I knew how many bushels of cob corn it took to make that bushel of shelled corn and I knew how many bushels of shelled corn I could expect to get per acre ( let's say 100 bushels) , I could then calculate how many cubic feet of storage I needed to build my corn crib for. Any help here is much appreciated. Thanks LJ
     
  2. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    There are 1.25 cubic feet in a bushel of whole kernel corn. Standard weight is 56 pounds.

    There are 2.5 cubic feet in a bushel of ear corn. Standard weight of a bushel of husked ear corn is 70.

    Determination is really the reverse in actual use. If a truck comes in with say 4,000 pounds of husked ear corn, the feed mill or elevator would divide by 70 to say there were 57 bushels on the truck and pay them on that basis.

    Remember bushels of corn per acre is usually for whole kernel corn. Whole ear calculations are difficult to calculate as it depends somewhat on the size of the ears. However, I would say if you figure out what you would need for shelled corn and doubled it, you should be in the ballpark for whole ear storage.

    Ken S. in WC TN
     

  3. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The specific answer to your question is: Both ear & shell corn are considered to be 56lbs of corn. They do not actually measure out a 'bushel of ear corn' - everything is always assumed to be a 56lb bushel of shelled corn.

    They assume 70lbs of ear corn gives you a bushel of corn (56lbs of kernals), BUT that is on dry (14-15% moisture) and ear corn is often picked around 24-30% moisture.....

    Bushels is a volume measure, and lbs is a weight measure, and the 2 really very seldom have any relation to each other. So these questions get difficult, as you asked it all wrong. :) We end up selling lbs of corn to an elevator (weight), but it gets priced per bu (volume) so a lot of assumptions and ajustments are made, less likely in your favor, to pretend we can make volume = weight and all are happy.......

    Anyhow, when all the calculating is done, you need about double the space to store the same amount of kernals. That's the simple answer, & you will be about right. Just go double.

    --->Paul
     
  4. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A bushel of ear corn makes a bushel of shelled corn, but takes up twice as much space. (2.5 cubic feet)
     
  5. Dreams30

    Dreams30 Lady Rider

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    I hope that made sense to someone! I never have thought about this question before but, now I would like the answer and I am hoping that it is in a way I can understand it! :eek:

    I think you guys just challenged my last brain cell into oblivion!
     
  6. lj

    lj Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your help. I do understand that this is a question of volume rather than weight. The important piece of info that I needed is that the voulme ratio of ear corn to shell corn is 2:1. Using my hypothetical yield of 100 bushels (shelled) per acre, if I want to store my corn in ear form, I will need 250 cubic feet of crib space for each acre I harvest. Now I need plans for constructing a simple but functional corn crib. I will probably build several small rather than one large one. Thanks for answering my question. LJ
     
  7. The cheapest and easiest corn crib is a 50 foot roll of wooden picket fencing. Thousands of old time farmers set up temporary cribs using pickets. Some might call it snow fence. They are stood in a circle on a layer of boards, plywood or what ever you can come up with to keep the corn off the bare ground. A smooth enough place at the opening to shovel corn out with a scoup shovel would be a worthy thing to have. Where the two ends come together place two steel T posts about 3 feet apart. The ends of the pickets are wired tightly together between the posts, and the posts are fastened tightly to the pickets which should be inside the posts. Tie the tops of the posts together with brace wire to prevent them from spreading when you open the ends of the pickets when you want to start removing corn. The secret to getting the crib to stand up real straight is dumping the corn directly in the middle so the corn spreads out evenly against the pickets. When the bottom row of pickets is full, another roll can be set right on top of the corn against the top of the first roll. The volume would be Pi R squared times the height. A piece of tarp of some sort will keep the corn dry. Don't try putting high moisture corn in the crib as the air to the center is limited unless you construct a wooden tunnel across the bottom. Easy to do.