corn breeding

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by james dilley, Mar 16, 2005.

  1. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Has any one tried to breed their own varieties of corn(hybrids) or other type of plants.I will weigh in tomorrow and tell what I am trying.
     
  2. Sharon in NY

    Sharon in NY Well-Known Member

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    I can't do it - too much field corn growing around me to make breeding projects reliable. I'm happy if I can simply save seed from my sweet corn. But it is definitely worth doing. Remember, you need at least 200 plants in order to have good genetic variation, and should save seed from at least 100 of them. What varieties are you crossing? What are you working towards?

    Sharon
     

  3. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have Bloody butcher that I am letting open pollinate with Reids yellow dent and I have about 12% of the seed is white dent ,this is to try to get a base line to build on
     
  4. spring77

    spring77 Well-Known Member

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    I'm starting my own field corn breeding project this year. I've got a small packet of Bloody Butcher and another of Ried's Yellow Dent. I bought a big packet of a unusual dent corn called Oaxacan Green Dent, the kernels are more blueish up close but if you squint from a few feet away they look green. I also have a bag of Wapsie Valley Dent that I got from Fedco and a packet of Early Butler that I got from the ARS/GRIN network (for FREE!). I'm planning on planting all of these in a mixed block planting, I will also have half of the planting started indoors and transplanted out in the hopes that the later corns will be far enough along to polinate the early corns at least a little bit. I'm just hoping to get a big mishmash mix this year, and do the same thing over again next year with seed leftover from this year. Then I want to start planting the crossed seed and letting it mix around for a few years and then start selecting for the traits I like. I just want to have my own field corn that has a good amount of genetic diversity in it.
     
  5. travlnusa

    travlnusa Well-Known Member

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    I used to work for a seed corn company research company in collage. To make sure a plant cosses with the exact plant you want it to:

    1) get some small white bag that are long and thin. I would use the waxed ones you see Hot Dogs sold in at convienice stores. Put that over the ear of corn you want to pollinate. You want to have this in place before any silks emerge. When the tassel forms on these plants, break it off

    2) Put a brown lunch bag over the tassel you want to collect pollen from. Fold the bottom of the bag over to seal up around the stalk.

    3) when silks are out on the plants you de-tasseled, go to the plant you have the brown paper bag on. Bend the plant over and shake the pollen off the tassel and it will collect in the bag.

    4) Now that you have the pollen ready to pour out, take the white bag off the ear, and pour the pollen onto the silks of the ear you want to develope.

    5) Put the brown paper bag ove the ear and wrap the bag round the stalk and staple in place.

    6) After you see that all the silks are brown and dried out in your area, you can take the bag off, but we would just leave them in place until harvest.
     
  6. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Guess that would keep earworms out too, eh?