Corn Binders

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by pasotami, Sep 13, 2006.

  1. pasotami

    pasotami Hangin out at the barn!

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    Talk to me about this... I have heard about them and I know the Amish use them. I have the horses and that is not part of the question.... for those that have seen them, what do they entail? Are they like a picker? Know where I can find photos of them or how they operate.... I will have 7 acres of corn this next year and really would like to know more.
     

  2. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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  3. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    My father brought one home from Iowa when I was about 13. It too had been converted from horse drawn. It had a wooden tongue about 9 feet long and 4X5 inch diameter. My father fashioned a new tongue from a stock of maple, and we pulled it with a Farmall M tractor.
    It had a short (about 7 inch) sickle bar that cut the corn stocks. then they went up the chute and were tied with a thin type of baler twine, went on and were deposited on ground as a bundle about 12-14 inches in diameter.
    No PTO as memory serves - I believe it was wheel driven. We had about 5 acres of corn that year below the Apple Orchard. The machine worked well and that part actually went reasonably well - It was picking up all those bundles that turned out to be a back breaking monumental task, LOL

    Yes, the old corn binder brought back a flood of reminiscing. I can see the bundles as if it were yesterday.
     
  4. ace admirer

    ace admirer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    i've got an international model i just purchased from a fellow...it uses a pto driven infeed, cutter, set of baler like needles to tie the bundle, then a out rigged conveyor to accumulate and then off load several bundles at a time.
     
  5. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

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    My Amish friend uses horses to pull the binder with a wagon behind and kids on the wagon stack the bundles. Then they go to the silo and are blown into the silo with gas engine on steel wheels. :cowboy:
     
  6. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A picker harvests the ears of corn for grain.

    A binder harvests the whole plant, more for silage making.

    --->Paul
     
  7. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    I never used a binder. Im to young. I have never actually used a picker myself. I can remember, however, the year my dad started miling cows. It was 1973, or 74. He was working full time at the state hospital, milking cows twice a day, and trying to get repairs, and field work done in between. Sleep was a luxury he didnt get to indulge in more than 3 or 4 hours per day. He had, I dunno, 80 acres of corn to pick I guess. He started in october I guess. Im not sure. I was only 4 or 5. He had so much to do he was still picking in december. 2 feet deep snow in the fields. I can remember being in the gravity box pushing the corn around so he could get as much on a load as possible, and get the job done. I can remember my hands freezing, and dad applogising for having to ask me to do that.

    I dontknwo where he got the drive. WHen I ask him today he just says "it had to be done". He has more drive at 62 than 5 guys my age.
     
  8. ace admirer

    ace admirer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    yeah, i think few know the sacrifices farmers have to make.

    my Dad said that one day his father came to the door of his fourth grade classroom and motioned for the teacher. he was telling her that he had to have his labor on the farm or they would loose it. it was his last day of formal education. i live on the same land...and my ten year old son has been driving heavy equipment for the last three years.....but still in school. not sure if its a scarifice or education (yes, he already spells better than i ever hoped to)