Cordless Drill

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by cathyharrell, Jun 25, 2005.

  1. cathyharrell

    cathyharrell Well-Known Member

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    Which cordless drill would you buy? Thanks, Cathy
     
  2. MoBarger

    MoBarger Goat's Milk soap for sale

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    Bigger the better. Try to find a 18V if you can. I like Dewalt but you really have to save your egg money to get one. ;)
     

  3. OD

    OD Well-Known Member

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    That depends on how much money you want to spend. If you want a good drill, but don't want to spend a lot, a Craftsman from Sears is a good buy. I have one that I used the whole time I was building our house, & it is still going strong. I can order new batteries for it, too, even though it is getting pretty old.
    I would recommend that you don't get a Black & Decker.
     
  4. Jimmy Mack

    Jimmy Mack Well-Known Member

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    I like my 9.6 volt Makita for its compactness. Bigger isn't always better, especially when your trying to get into tight spaces or your holding on to the tool for long periods of time. Those big ones can get heavy!

    Quality tools are an investment.
     
  5. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    1. Dewalt
    2. Milwaukee
    3. Makita
    4. Craftsman

    All are good products. My Dewalt cordless has been extremely reliable over the 6 years I've had it. Used a LOT, abused, etc. Never a problem.
     
  6. Lerxt

    Lerxt Well-Known Member

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    My first cordless was a Black&Decker. Burned out the clutch on it first time I tried to drill a hole as opposed to driving a screw. Taught me a lesson about getting what you pay for.

    So I went with DeWalt after that. I had it for at least 5 years. The last year I had it I was doing electrical work on home remodels (means a lot of wood boring) and we got our homestead (more wood boring to fix gates and such) and it finally died from...yep burned out clutch.

    But after 5 years and the abuse I put on it in the last year I expected it. Yeah it cost 4X what the Craftsman cost but it lasted more than 2 months.

    My new DeWalt is heavier duty and for really nasty stuff I have my air compressor with a drill and air wrench. Cool thing about the air compressor is you can charge it up and roll it out to do small stuff.

    I'd look for construction on anything you buy. Pick them up. Check the weight. Shake em a bit. See what rattles (better be nothing). I think I paid $140 for my 14.4V DeWalt.

    Oh yeah, get at least 2 Batteries. I now have 6 and 3 chargers. Part of the reason I got a 14.4V again - batteries all match.
     
  7. crashy

    crashy chickaholic goddess

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    We have a skil and it works great for us. We use it around the place gets quite a work out sometimes but keeps on working its 4 years old.
     
  8. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Makita...I love ours. But be sure and buy an extra battery or two...of course waiting for one to charge is a good chance to take a coffee break! We have two that we use constantly on the farm...found one at a garage sale with case and extra battery...a lucky day! DEE
     
  9. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    18v -- only way to go, I hated the old 9v I had -- swore off cordless for 10 years, now I'm back. Love my cordless Coleman with two batteries, case, drill bits, screw driver bits, and charger. Two levels of variable speed, adjustable pressure -- just great!

    At Costco in Vancouver, $49.99 CDN or $41 USD -- best deal I have seen in a long time.

    Alex
     
  10. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Jeeze, my first Makita was red and you had to plug it in to the wall to charge it back up. I used that for a good many years then they came out with battery packs, I bought the 9.6v and sold the old one for most of what I'd paid for it.

    I did the same thing every time they came out with a better version, upgraded and sold the old stuff for most of what I paid originally. Probably had 20 or so and never had one go bad except a battery or two.

    Right now I have an 18 volt Makita and one of those DeWalt sets that have the 18 volt drill, skill saw and sawzall. Man, do I love that cordless sawzall! Just as powerful as a corded model. I wanna build me a holster so's I can pack it around the home place with me at all times. Don't like that tree? ZZZZZ need to enlarge the hole in the coop? ZZZZZ Goat threatens to butt me again? ZZZZZ
     
  11. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Get two. YOu will want to have one with a drill bit and one with a screwdriver tip. It saves switching back and forth.
     
  12. Lerxt

    Lerxt Well-Known Member

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    Good point. My bum one actually will still drive a screw into a pilot hole. Handy as all get out.
     
  13. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    I've always been a buy the best when it came to tools. I bought a cheapo Harbor Freight cordless drill for a specific purpose and thought it would just be disposable. That was over 6 yrs. ago and I have done everything to mistreat and abuse it. I would weigh out the amount you were going to use it and decide from there. As I said this cheapo HF 14V drill cost about $19 and is still going strong with a lot of it's life being every day commercial use.
     
  14. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    If you get a cordless it will most likely have a battery type that you'll need to treat differently than say, car batteries.

    For longer life you're supposed to draw down the battery each time before reacharging. And when you recharge let it compleatly recharge before using it.
     
  15. MoBarger

    MoBarger Goat's Milk soap for sale

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    That is why we have his and hers :D Or really, his, his, his and hers ;)
     
  16. Ahne Homestead

    Ahne Homestead Well-Known Member

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    Cathy I have an 18vt skill and love it. The only problem is battery replacement. As others have said you need to consider what you are going to use it for and how much. If only every once in a while for light duty I don't think it matters all that much. But if you are remodeling your home, building a deck, or planning on using it everyday I would go with an 18vt with two batteries and choose a manufacturer thats been around a long time and continues to supply parts (namely batteries) for choosen drill. Dewalt fits this description. They know it and charge a higher price because of it. Carl
     
  17. pointer_hunter

    pointer_hunter Well-Known Member

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    DW needed an 18v for work. Her company paid for it (within reason) so we picked up a Ryobi (sp?) pack. It contained the drill, circular saw, saws all, flashlight, vacuum, charger and two batteries. I think it was on sale for like 140. She used it for a while until she found a "pretty one." Her's was a little heavy for her anyway ;) So, we picked up a Skil 18v. It is just as tough as the Ryobi but about half the weight! Plus, the battery disconnects for her a lot easier on the new one. Naturally, I got to keep the other one :D
     
  18. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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    I'vr had cheap ones that are basically worthless. Buy a good one. Generally Black & Decker will be less expensive than DeWalt and both have been excellent.
     
  19. amelia

    amelia Well-Known Member

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    I have a 9-volt Makita but have used both 9 and 12-volt. Basically I find both nearly useless as drills but great for use as screwdrivers. Even fully charged, the cordless models simply don't have enough power to drill through anything but the softest woods, and even then you've bearing down and burning up your bit. Forget anything like oak or maple, and don't even think about metal. I can't speak to the 14 or 18-volt models--they're too heavy to be a useful option for me.
     
  20. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Boy, that sure hasn't been my experience amelia. Maybe you need to have your bits sharpened.

    I work with alot of stainless steel and I use my cordless tools almost exclusively for that, and there aren't many materials harder than that. In fact, I don't just drill with them, I use hole saws, and vari-bits up to 1 3/8.