Corded adaptor for cordless tools

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by countrymech, Dec 11, 2005.

  1. countrymech

    countrymech Well-Known Member

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    Several years ago I read an article on how to make an adaptor for cordless power tools that allow the use of a power cord. I know that SKIL and DeWalt have both offered this option on certain tools but I can't find it for my 14.4 tools. I think the atrticle was in the old American Survival Guide and I saved it but now I can't find it. Does anyone have this article or know what is required to build an adaptor? Thanx for your help.
     
  2. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    hmm I would like to see that artical also.

    Basically you need a Power supply that meets the Ampere requirements of the tool with the output voltage of the tool(or close)

    I got a varible amp/volt power supply, supplies continuous 3amps from 1-30 volts, it would probably work, only problem is it is the size of a toaster.

    I'm just wondering, how about a battery charger? They supply 13.8v, that is close to 14.4 and probably will work.(except they're huge)
     

  3. BigBoy

    BigBoy No attitude here...

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    I forget which forum I saw this on but some guy says that when his cordless tools get to the point that the batteries wear out and it isn't worth buying new ones then he will disassemble the tool, solder on the wiring directly and then use it corded with car batteries. He says he has never burnt one up no matter the voltage. If the tools voltage is lower than the car battery then it runs faster and if it's higher then the tool runs slower. I've got a drill that's almost time to try this on.
     
  4. John Hill

    John Hill Grand Master

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    Oilpatch is right I think. (Actually I meant Big Boy, but Oilpatch is right too)

    I have an old Ryobi 7.5volt battery drill that I put a cable on, basically took out the batteries and added a length of lighting flex.

    It has recently screwed all the roofing screws on a small addition I built powered from an 18volt power supply!

    It drove the roof screws really well but I was very careful to let the power off the moment it stalled.
     
  5. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    Well, Hell:

    If you have an l8-volt power supply you might as well have a corded drill and plug it into the house current. (Or are you working where there IS no house current?)

    I have a fine Black and Decker drill, variable speed, adjustable clutch for driving screws. It was a gift with one battery, and of course that battery eventually went bad. New ones cost more than a new drill on sale, so now I have a new drill, saw, stud-finder kit.

    It would be nice to be able to do something with that old drill, but what would I do with the new?
    Ox
     
  6. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    buy a second tool that takes the same battery, that way you will have new battries and two tools to use in a cordless manner,
     
  7. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    Hey, I just did this. I found an old Makita 9.6V hammer drill in a box of junk. The battery was dead and no charger available.I took the guts out of the battery and left the plastic housing. Then I got a long cord from an old vacuum cleaner. Every time I see one in the dumpster, I snip the cord. I soldered the cord to the battery terminals. On the other end, I took an old 12V cell phone charger and removed the circuitboards and soldered to the contacts in it. It works fine. Runs good and fast, too.
     
  8. countrymech

    countrymech Well-Known Member

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    Thanx for the info Ed. I have seven baterries and several tools that run this 14.4 battery both DeWalt and Black and Decke(just trim the centering tab off and both tools will run the same batteries). I have a 14.4 recip saw that eats up the batts and some jobs are just too big for a battery eventhough I have two chargers. I also wondered about the increase in speed, I figured it would pick it up. The same thing happened to my old 8N when I swapped from 6volt to 12 volt. As always thanx for the info. Paul
     
  9. John Hill

    John Hill Grand Master

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    I feel that any of the low voltage battery tools will be happy to run on volts up to the 12 or so volts from a vehicle battery and I am sure the higher voltage tools would tolerate a voltage overload too.

    It is not the volts that cook the motors but the amps and increasing the volts without increasing the load on the motor just makes the motor run faster and it produces a little less torgue.

    What would be sudden death for a tool being run over voltage would be stalling the tool. When the batteries are getting flat in the drill there is a tendency to let it labour down to the last available erg but if it labours like that on a high voltage, low impedance supply (a vehicle battery for example) it will surely get cooked.

    I use my low voltage drill on the 18 volt supply because it is lower geared than any corded drill I have and it is reversable too.
     
  10. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    Ive thought about the same thing, but I dont want to lug a car battery around, and if you use a cord to give you some distance from the batery then there is no point of having a cordless drill, and 12 volt drills arent very powerfull