Cookstove/Fire Problem

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by wendys_goats, Jan 4, 2007.

  1. wendys_goats

    wendys_goats wendys_goats

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    This morning I put wood in the cook stove like I normally do and had the ash pan door open to get the wood going. I went about making a pot of coffee and all of a sudden poof and ashes came out the bottom and through the side vents. Then I had this roaring fire in there and stuff was crackling up the pipes. It scared the you know what out of me. Anyone know what caused this :help: ???
    I shut the bottom door and I went out to make sure there were no flames coming out the chimney.
     
  2. no1cowboy

    no1cowboy Single male homesteader

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    you had a small chimney fire, the crackling in the pipes was creosote burning and puff of ash was a back draft. you need to burn a nice hot fire once a day to keep the creosote down. :)
     

  3. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Yep, small chimney fire.
     
  4. MullersLaneFarm

    MullersLaneFarm Well-Known Member

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    Was it windy this morning? You could have had a sudden down draft that caused it or perhaps something other than paper & wood went into the firebox??? maybe something flamable on the paper/wood?

    I generally open the vent just a tiny bit and have the flue all the way open when I first start the cook stove.
     
  5. wendys_goats

    wendys_goats wendys_goats

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    Thank you for your responses. It wasn't to windy and all I put in was 2 pieces of wood on the coals. I close down the drafts on the stove at night so it stays going. Do you think I close it down too much? I shut the draft so it goes around and under the oven and close the side vents about 3/4 of the way. That keeps it going all night. In the morning I just stir up the coals and add more wood to it
     
  6. MullersLaneFarm

    MullersLaneFarm Well-Known Member

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    Dang, you must have a pretty tight stove. I keep the flue (drafts) & vents closed most of the time and can never keep coals alive overnight.

    What do y'all suggest for chimney fires?? Close the stove down to cut off air or open 'er up and let 'er burn off?

    The chimney went straight up when we had the Comfort 'Oak'. Now that we have a wood cook range, there are a couple of 90* angles thrown in about 6" apart.
     
  7. no1cowboy

    no1cowboy Single male homesteader

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    it is the low fire that makes the moste creosote. You can buy chemicals to keep the creosote down but if made a good hot fire each morning it will burn off some of the creosote that was made the night before, Also running a chimney brush down the pipes A few times a year will help.
     
  8. tamsam

    tamsam Well-Known Member

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    One thing that may have happened was you put the wood on coals and it didn't flame up. When it built up gasses from being on the coals and finally caught with a flame you get a big whoosh which will blow ashes and soot if you have any out every crack. Then you could have had a chimney fire but after the flame up like that you will have a big fire in the stove. I have had it happen here and no chimney fire. Good luck in the future. Ps I always throw in a piece of burning paper if I don't have a good hot bed of coals. Sam
     
  9. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    I think it could have been either the gas buildup and sudden flareup or a small chimney fire or both. I clean my inside bends in the pipe about every two months, or more often if the weather is mild and I get lax about doing a daily good hot fire. Mine is a Kitchen Queen, like most of my Amish neighbors, and it has a huge firebox. I can go away for three days after filling it and dampering it down and have coals when I come back, so over night is really simple. I do tend to get up once in the night and I throw a couple of pieces on it at the time if the weather is colder and I didn't dampen down so far. My house is usually nice a snuggy warm even in the morning.

    I do make a point of it most days to either make a really hot baking fire, or at least burn some paper and cardboard in it to burn out the pipes. I never have trouble with buildup of creosote when we have a good cold winter and I keep a hot fire, but this mild winter we are having is dangerous as far as build up unless we pay attention.

    edited to add: for flue fire......you can buy baking soda in bulk at most feed stores. Keep a large can of baking soda by the stove to throw on the fire and then dampen down completely..........cut the air supply the best you can. Have your fire extinguisher near at hand (with a current "charge") to hit any blowout that possible could happen. We now have a steel roof which helps me feel a bit more like I could control a chimney fire, but the best controled chimney fire is the one that never happened because you maintained your chimney appropriately.
     
  10. wendys_goats

    wendys_goats wendys_goats

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    I think what Tamsam said could be the possibility cause it was like an explosion in there like some one threw gas on it. Just a big whoosh and then the fire was burning real hot.

    Tonight I'm letting it go out to clean the chimney and pipes to make sure