cooking oil

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by kathrynlmv, Feb 4, 2005.

  1. kathrynlmv

    kathrynlmv Well-Known Member

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    What's the best...safest, more ecologicially sound way of disposing of cooking oil? You're not supposed to compost it and the worms don't want it. Where should it go? Kathrynlmv
     
  2. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Since cooking oils are an organic compound from plants I would pour small amounts of it where I needed to keep weeds down. Examples are around fence posts or utility poles, perhaps along the edges of buildings.

    Before we learned of the ill affects of motor oil on the ground, I used to always pour a narrow band of it where concrete driveways met soil. This kept the soil from getting soft and squishing out. We never did see any ill affects from it such as in well water, but I sure am glad we stopped the practice after learning our wrongs.
     

  3. Jack in VA

    Jack in VA Well-Known Member

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    I pour it on my burn pile.
     
  4. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Bear hunters use it for bait....we get ours from McDonalds...and the guy that does the bio-desil? is from this very town...in Maine
     
  5. al

    al Well-Known Member

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    It makes an excelant dorment spray for the fruit trees.
     
  6. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    Uh oh :eek: Why aren't we supposed to compost it??
     
  7. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Critters might try to get into the compost, and it might make it stink. That's all I know of.
     
  8. Okay, what is wrong with composting it? Isn't it made from vegatables, seeds, and nuts which are biodegradable? And grease comes from animals that are biodegradable?

    I usually don't have to worry about grease and used cooking oil as we just add it in with the slop that the dogs and cats eat. They don't seem to mind it at all!
     
  9. kathrynlmv

    kathrynlmv Well-Known Member

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    As an oil, it is too concentrated, and causes the normal separation between soil particles to be filled in and then deprive the soil, and dependent organisms of air. If you put the whole soybean, or corn on the compost pile, it would break down naturally, in the right proportions.....but once the oil has been separated from the rest of the seed, it's too viscous...and makes for deadly (to organisms) slime. kathrynlmv
     
  10. jeafl

    jeafl Active Member

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    Supposedly you shouldn't use oils or fats in compost piles because they take so long to decompose and they attract insects and other animals. I've read that worms will eat these materials, but they usually go rancid before a worm box can consume them.

    You can use a few drops of cooking oil on the ears on a corn stalk to prevent worms from eating the corn- but I've learned from experience that vegetable oil (even unused) attracts ants, so baby oil is better for this.

    If you have any diesel powered vehicles or machinery you can modify them to use waste vegetable oil as a fuel. You have to clean and filter the oil before using it as a fuel and it is not worth the effort if all you have is a normal household supply to be recycled. However, if you get access to what restaurants have to dispose of, you can add your household waste to it and then have plenty for vehicles or machinery.

    I have bibliographic data for some books on using vegetable oil as a diesel substitute. I'll post this info if anyone is interested.
     
  11. kathrynlmv

    kathrynlmv Well-Known Member

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    Well, I'm interested, Jeafl, it sounds too good to be true....let me know what you've got....and I'll look the stuff up......thanks....kathrynlmv
     
  12. jeafl

    jeafl Active Member

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    From the fryer to the fuel tank : the complete guide to using vegetable oil as an alternative fuel
    Joshua Tickell; edited by Kaia Roman.
    Joshua Tickell Media ProductionsNew Orleans, LA
    2003
    0970722702


    The Biodiesel Handbook
    Gerhard Knothe
    AOCS Press
    2004
    1893997790


    I have not read either of these books yet, so I don't know exactly they have.

    You may also want to check out BiodieselWarehouse.com http://www.biodieselwarehouse.com/


    Glancing at the prices on this website clearly indicates that converting waste food oil to motor fuel will not be worth the effort if you have only a household supply. However, if you can obtain a source of used vegetable oil from a restaurant, the conversion may be well-worth it.

    I once read in a magazine article that someone who uses biodiesel realized that is auto exhaust had the distinct aroma of french fries. Biodiesel may not be good for a diet.
     
  13. Sioux Nation

    Sioux Nation Active Member

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  14. Puddleduck

    Puddleduck Well-Known Member

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    Jack...
    GREAT IDEA.