Cooking Grass-finished Verses Feedlot Beef

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Ken Scharabok, Dec 23, 2005.

  1. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    If you cook/prepare your grass-finished beef differently than you would feetlot/store purchased beef, how and why?
     
  2. momanto

    momanto SW FLORIDA HAPPYLAND

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    I Grew Up On Grass Fed Beef. That And Dry Lima Beans, Rice, And Sliced Tomatoes.

    My Mom Prepared The Hamburger With Flour, Salt, Pepper, Little Water And Patted Out Thin Patties. She Then Pan Fried Them In A Lightly Greased Iron Skillet.

    They Were The Best I Have Ever Eaten. Too Bad, All My Herd Now Are Pets And Couldnt Eat One If Starving.

    Mom
     

  3. lilsassafrass

    lilsassafrass Well-Known Member

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    The lower fat content of teh grass fed and even the corn fed of the highlands is one of my selling points ..
    most of my customers I tell to cook it much like you would venison .. as most are familiar with that ..
    for those not .. adding a bit of oil (I suggest olive ) or water when cooking the ground meat .. is helpful
    and not to over cook the steaks .. when roasting a good cut of meat .. I thread it with bacon .. or if i am in a health consious mood I will inject a bit of olive oil .....
    basically when cooking you need to replace the fat with something .. or hold it in by searing the piece of meat before you cook it .. like in the case of pot roasts or stew meat ....

    Paula
    Hyde Park Farm
     
  4. Carol K

    Carol K Well-Known Member

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    I hear that you have to cook grass fed at lower temps. than if it were corn fed. The only problem I have is I sometimes cook the steaks too fast, need to lower the heat after they are seared, then they work better.

    Carol
     
  5. cindyc

    cindyc Well-Known Member

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    Grass fed mantra SLOW AND LOW! Cook slowly over low temps and it will be really good. Cook fast over high temps it will be tough.

    We love grass fed. It's pretty much all we eat now. You do have to cook it differently.
     
  6. jersey girl

    jersey girl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Lot of folks around here soak it in a salt brine overnight before cooking larger pieces like roasts.
     
  7. unioncreek

    unioncreek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    One of the people I work with was in Brazil on business about two years ago and had some of their beef. They are all grass feed and she said they cooked them slow and on low heat. Was the best beef she said she's had.

    Bobg
     
  8. PJM

    PJM Active Member

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    For stewing beef, pepper steak, pot roasts and the like I cook my beef over low heat for a long time, but also add a cup of coffee (just black!) instead of water. You can't taste the coffee, but it does help tenderize, adds a great deep colour and a darker, beefier taste. - how to describe a flavour? It's an old trick I learned from a neighbour. Plus it makes nice gravy.
     
    farmerkhaiti likes this.
  9. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    We cook our Dexter grass-fed just like store-bought and it works out fine. The burger is about like store-bought extra-lean (but better tasting!), so I start with a cool pan when possible so it doesn't stick so much. Or add beef fat (saved from pot roast), oil or butter to the pan.
     
  10. translplant

    translplant Well-Known Member

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    I got some incredible grass fed filet mignon the other night. NOT cheap but this was a treat. It was delicious, a different taste for sure. Not gamey, not fatty, not steak-y. Grass-y? Maybe.
    1. Cooked it straight from the refrigerator rather than warm up to room temp as sometimes proscribed with corn fed.
    2. Covered each steak in olive oil, salt and pepper and really rubbed it in to each little steak.
    3. Seared each steak in olive oil in a cast iron frying pan first, 2 minutes each side and roll the edges around too. This could also be done on a grill. Creating a crusty sear helps hold the juices in for the next step.
    4. Pop all steaks in 350 degree oven, middle rack for 10-15 minutes depending on how done you like your meat.
    5. Let rest, under foil, 5 minutes.
    6. Absolutely yummy, tasty, tender top-notch steaks.
    I normally would sear longer, cook in 450 degree oven and raise the rack higher. I think these modifications helped. The key is shorter length of cooking AND lower cooking temps from what the butcher told me.
     
  11. mink

    mink Well-Known Member

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    i raise my own grass fed beef and the only difference is it dont have the bright red color that the store meat has. but it defineately has a different taste...mink
     
  12. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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  13. Cookiecows

    Cookiecows BeltieBandits Wife

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    We've raised forage/grassfed lowfat cattle for the last 4 years and cooking has been a struggle at times for me. We learned not long ago that the age of butchering has bearing on the tenderness also. Since we are a start up farm, we were unable to let a steer go over a year old before our freezer went empty and aparently if you can wait a couple years the meat is better. We had to cull a 2-3yr old cow recently and the meat was the best we'd had so far off our farm. My husband keeps the records on them so I'm just estimating ages.
    Deb
     
  14. Teacupliz

    Teacupliz Well-Known Member

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    I actually liked the older cow (taste) we sent to the butcher then the 2 year old grass fed, went last month. But I am willing to learn to cook it better. I never have much time to cook- so it is fast and hot here.. We had some steaks last week- they were good but kind of chewy. The hamburge does not have a lick of fat- so I add olive oil - it is tasty though. I have another all grass fed going to the butcher soon-
    Thanks for the idea-s Liz
     
  15. robin f

    robin f amplify love

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    lol ok on the other side of the coin / fence. i much prefer young corn fed red veal, 6 months old, if you like tender tasty fall off the bone, this is it, for roasts i never defrost, just add a little, and i mean a little steak spice to the top of roast, cover with foil, put in convection oven and cook til ready ( stick fork in, no blood follows fork out its ready) please don't ask for how long because i never time it , the setting is between 100 and 110c, for steaks i do defrost, rub in steak spice, sear them over the bbq flame both sides and cook on medium heat. i don't use bbq sauce, to me it takes away from the meat, i don't do stew meat, ( that all goes into burger) if for some reason i fancy a little stew i will cut up a round steak. burgers. well i add a little onion, a little steak spice, roll and flatten, sear each side on bbq......... yes even in winter lol
     
  16. MayLOC

    MayLOC Well-Known Member

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    hmmm. We don't do much different. I'd say our grass-fed is about like 90% lean burger from the grocery store. So plenty of fat in it w/o adding anything extra, but not a cupful of fat to drain after cooking also. So ground beef cooks perfect and patties hold together and grill great. I do brush on olive oil to grill steaks. And I do all roasts in the crock on low. But I have always been a cook to taste/look vs. follow the recipe directions kind of gal.
     
  17. Christiaan

    Christiaan Dutch Highlands Farm

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    For our grass-fed Highlands I've learned that for roasts its low and slow after an initial hi-temp searing. So the roast goes into a 450 - 475 oven for 15 minutes then down to 300 - 325 until internal temp of 140 or more usually for me, when the meat "springs" just right when pressed on. Never go further than medium rare. Steaks into a hot pan, sear on both sides, about 3 minutes a side. Or on the grill. I like my steaks blue, but grass-fed steaks should never go beyond medium rare.
    Never make burgers so don't know how well they hold together.
    For pot roasts, stews, etc cook just like grain-fed.