contemplating purchasing a rifle. . .

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by labrat, Nov 2, 2006.

  1. labrat

    labrat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    310
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2005
    Location:
    central Bluegrass State
    I started this thread in Self Reliance, but thought it might get more response in Homesteading Questions. . .

    I have a question and this is the best, and probably most knowledgeable, forum to bring up the subject. As a veteran I am not a firearms virgin, however, because of my distaste for war, I have stayed away from firearms since that time. However, I am contemplating purchasing a rifle for protection, both personal and for my critters, when I make the move to my next homestead. My question is that in the Dick’s Sporting Goods flyer, I have seen multi-barrel rifles, one particular a Rossi Triple Threat three-barrel combo that I am contemplating. In the past I have seen the youth matched pair that this is comparable to but the Rossi Triple Threat is a 20 gauge, a .243 and a .22LR and since this is on sale and priced just at $230, it fits my budget and I would think suit my needs. Can anyone tell me more, positive and negative toward this weapon?
     
  2. TeachMe

    TeachMe Active Member

    Messages:
    44
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Location:
    Central NC
    I have no experience with the Rossi combos but have read that the barrel and receiver must be fitted at the factory, i.e. you have multiple barrels but you can't swap them at home. I don't know this to be true, but it is what I read. To me this would limit the usefulness, but as far as I know the only multi-barrel rifle systems that have barrels you can swap yourself are the Thomspon Center firearms which tend to be a bit pricier (if that's a word).

    If you are looking for one firearm to cover self-defense and closer range defense/hunting I would consider a pump-action 12 gauge such as the Mossberg 500 or Remington 870. With a shotgun you can swap between a security barrel, field barrel or fully rifled slug barrel and choose ammuntion for hunting birds through deer or self defense.

    This is only my opinion and is worth as much as you paid for it.
     

  3. dave85

    dave85 dave85

    Messages:
    126
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2005
    Location:
    Sunnyvale, CA,wanting to get to MO
    combo barrels can be changed at home.
    Only if you purchase other barrels later, then the rifle has to be sent to the factory to be fitted.
    I'm not even sure Rossi does this but NEF does.
    But to be clear, if you get a Rossi combo. it is very simple to change the barrels.
    this is a very good homestead gun if you only have 1 gun.

    My problem is, I always have the wrong barrel mounted seems like. :shrug:
    Dave
     
  4. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,373
    Joined:
    May 14, 2002
    Rossi is generally a very cheap rifle. But for the money, I've heard that they are decent. And the model you are interested in has received pretty good reviews. Again, "for the money". Remember that it is a single shot rifle. My choice would be to have one in each caliber. But "for the money" I don't think you can go wrong.
     
  5. Macybaby

    Macybaby I love South Dakota Supporter

    Messages:
    5,321
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2006
    Location:
    South Dakota
    May be a bit higher end on the price, but if I was looking for "multi" gun, I'd consider one of Savage Arms over/under combinations, not one that you can switch barrels on.

    You can get a 12 or 20 gauge shotgun, and the rifle in .22, .223 or .17, depending on what you need. I'm pretty sure it is a single shot, don't know if that is an issue for you. This way if you need the shotgun, you don't have to worry if you left it with the .22 barrel on it or vise versa.

    I'd love to get one for my hubby, as he seems to always grab the wrong gun - like he grabs the shotgun and then the critter runs under something, and he wishes he had grabbed the .22. In our area, I'd probably opt for the .17 or the .223, not the .22. We actually have rifled chambered in each, and I feel the .22 doesn't get near as clean a kill as the .17, but the .223 is often over-kill for the smaller varmits.

    If you can always plan what you need ahead of time (like going hunting or target practice) it is not an issue, but when the chickens start yelling and you only have seconds to go out and deal with an intruder, you don't have a lot of time to make changes.

    Cathy
     
  6. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,977
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2002
    Location:
    East TN
    I have owned Rossi firearms and they are good dependable guns. I am not familiar with that particular model but the description makes me want to own one. Around the house the most useful guns are shotguns and 22's. The one thing I want to add is a varmint gun, high powered small caliber. The gun you describe fits all needs except the time required to alter it for the moment which is possibly why 3 guns would be better.
     
  7. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,511
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2004
    Location:
    Louisiana
    Rossi?

    Servicable, but they're cheap for a reason.

    Try adjusting the trigger on one of their single shot rifles, and you'll know what I mean...some gunsmiths can't even do it.

    For around $230, a Remington 870 Express 12 gauge will do most of the chores around the homestead. If you want a bit more reach, buy a rifled choke tube, and you should be good out with the right slugs to 100 yards or a hair more.
     
  8. tuvold

    tuvold Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    74
    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2006
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
  9. Country Doc

    Country Doc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    427
    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2005
    I agree with TeachMe. A 12 gauge pump shotgun (rem 870 my choice) for self defense loaded with bird or 6 shot. What you want in a self defense gun is a big blast and stopping power with minimal penetration of walls. Any bullet that exits the target or misses is unused energy that penetrate walls and can hit family. Bird shot is better at close range since the pellets do not exit the target and all the energy is expended on the target. In the movies people are hit with a 9mm pistol and drop dead. Real life they often keep coming. The shotgun stops them cold.
    A shotgun also is a pretty good varmint gun unless you are at long range.
     
  10. labrat

    labrat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    310
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2005
    Location:
    central Bluegrass State
    I can give the link for the Dick's catalogue but it doesn't say much else, and I've tried the Rossi website, it doesn't even show the product.
    As someone on another forum mentioned, it is a single shot rifle and of course, knowing which barrel to have on at the time could be tricky; so if I decide on the Rossi, and according to the photo all three barrels com with the rifle, not purchased separately, most likely, I would leave the .20 gauge as the primary weapon, as I would be more concerned about the two-legged varmint than the four. He also stated that the .243 would be somewhat useful for deer, but only if I were a very good shot; that I am not. His thoughts were that the .20 gauge would be for two-legged varmints; the .22 for raccoons and maybe a .308 would be better for deer. At this time I can only afford on rifle.
     
  11. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,511
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2004
    Location:
    Louisiana
    Personal viewpoint...most people who use guns need at least three.

    These are:

    1. 12 gauge shotgun
    2. 22 LR rifle
    3. Centerfire rifle, 25 caliber or larger.

    Just as a fish-n-ski boat doesn't do a real good job of either because of compromises, neither can one gun do it all.

    IMO, the 12 gauge comes the closest. It works well for personal protection, especially with the right loads. It can serve well on upland game. As I've already said, it can be an effective big game getter out to a hundred yards or so.

    The 22 comes in second, but is also essential around the place. Useful for pest eradication, butchering time, and some small game hunting, it's cheap to shoot, and the rifles are usually modestly priced.

    Having touted both the 12 gauge and the 22, there are times when reach is needed. If you deer hunt beanfields or open spaces, hunt other large game, or just need to whack a coyote at the other end of the pasture, long distance is the next best thing to being there...and nothing says long distance like a centerfire rifle. For efficient work on big game animals, I'm not much on the 24 calibers, I think things start with the .257 Roberts and go up from there. My personal "do-all" would be a 300 Win Mag, but that's probably too much for the occasional user to shoot well. Think 30-06, 270, 308, ...stuff you can find on any country store shelf.

    And speaking of triggers on rifles....a lot of guys blame their rifles for not shooting well when the the blame usually falls into one of three categories - A) improper loads - different rifles have their favorite loads, B) poor triggers - half of a rifle's accuracy is in its trigger, not its barrel, and 3) poor shooters.
     
  12. MN Mom

    MN Mom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    238
    Joined:
    May 19, 2003
    Location:
    a state of confusion...ha ha. MN
    I bought the Rossi triple combo last spring - 50cal bp/12ga/243- I wanted the 50 and the 243 and will probably dump the 12 on ebay soon.

    Jon
     
  13. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,808
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2003
    Location:
    Dysfunction Junction, SW PA
    I have a rossi 410/22, Ive had no probem with it.

    its a good gun, cheaply made as in it isnt as smooth a trigger as my target 22.

    but it shoots, and its a simple design.

    I bought the youth model because its small enough to stuff in a backpack whenits broken down.
     
  14. electronrider

    electronrider Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    290
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2004
    Location:
    West Central Indiana
    The 20 guage is fine for personal protection ( go to http://www.theboxotruth.com/index.htm for info on 20 guage shotgun as home defense). .22 LR will take care of most of the varmit problems, and is dirt cheap to use. For anything bigger the .243 will do the job. The biggest drawbacks are changing the barrels, and the fact that it is only a single shot. Personnaly, I would save pennies for a nice 12 guage, a decent .22 mag ( much better than .22 LR imho), and then look for a decent highpowered rifle for what those two wouldnt cover. It will take you longer, but you would be much better served IMO.
     
  15. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,484
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2005
    Location:
    Florida
    I pretty much agree with Jolly, except on a couple of minor points. I personally don't like a 300 Mag. Down here we just don't have game large enough to have to put up with the racket and recoil. For elk, moose, or big bear they're fine, but I just think they're overkill for whitetails. Also, I do like a .243. A lot of deer have been killed with them, but they do require better shot placement. My personal favorite is the .270, quite a bit more power than the .243, but still not a lot of recoil.
     
  16. poorboy

    poorboy Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,051
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Location:
    ozark foothills, Mo
    Bought my wife ( she's kinda short) a rossi youth
    .22-20ga. combo., everybody that has shot it with the 20 ga. bbl. on it, has no wish to do so again. Musta been some sadist that came up with a sub 5lb. 20ga. for youngins. Would only shoot the damn thing if it was the only gun we had.http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/images/icons/icon8.gif
    Angry :flame:
     
  17. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,511
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2004
    Location:
    Louisiana
    It's kinda why I call the 300 mag a "do-all". It works fine for big stuff with 180 or 200g loads. For hunting whitetails, I use a 150g Barnes and load to about 3300fps, which will let you take 400yd shots pretty easily (if the wind is not too bad).

    I'm not a big fan of the 243. It's a great paper-puncher, works well on varmints, but I think it is more of an expert's gun when it comes to deer. I've had to blood trail one too many deer for folks to be entirely happy with it. It does a great job with good shot placement, but I want a gun that will put 'em down if I hit 'em somewhere in the hair.

    270? Used one for years, still do. 140g Barnes at 3000fps. But in the gun I have, that load does kick.

    For folks that want something common that does a nice job, I seem to keep coming back to the 308. It's very efficient in terms of powder used vs what you get out of it. It's found on most any country store shelf. And I don't think I've ever seen a 308 rifle that shot badly.

    Lastly, I think the 260 Remington makes a lot of sense for some folks. Based on the old 6.5/308 wildcat, you get the mild recoil and efficiency of the 308 case, but you get that wonderful 140g 264 caliber bullet. It's fairly long for caliber, providing increased sectional density, so even mediocre bullets work well. But I think it's more of a caliber for us gun nuts, than for the average Joe, simply due to the availability of rounds (not that it matters if you have forming dies for 308 cases and roll your own).
     
  18. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,787
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2005
    Location:
    IL, right smack dab in the middle
    If your not a gun nut the details discussed here are really irellavant. Go to your local gundealer/pawnshop and by a cheap multishot shotgun. about $69 bucks .Want a rifle?? Same advice .Pistol? Same advice Buy a box of shells at the same time and get a test fire garantee If you cant get all three (gun,shells,garantee)in the same store move on.
     
  19. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,787
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2005
    Location:
    IL, right smack dab in the middle
    Heck if you go all out and get all three it wont cost ya as much as the one new gun and you will own some interesting history!
     
  20. diamondtim

    diamondtim Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    751
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Location:
    WI
    Fantasymaker has a good point.

    I have high power, surplus military rifles that were bought for $50-100. My first .22 was bought for $50 (a Romanian training rifle that is a tack driver). This has been in the last 5 years.

    If you have a Dunham's, Big 5 or other store that carries "vintage" rifles you can get some really good deals. Also look at auctions, gun shows and smaller gun shops for trade-ins. A gun dealer who deals in only "hunting" rifles will give you a good deal to take an old military gun off his hands.

    Military rifles are made for field stripping and can be repaired and maintained by someone with rudimentary mechanical skills.

    For the money you'll pay for the combo, you can find 3 good used guns if you look a little. :hobbyhors