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I'm in the planning stages for writing a book/eBook. What I'd like to do is something like a "Learn to Knit" book with each project teaching a new skill. Projects would be more of the practical homestead-type rather than "fluff" projects (not that there wouldn't be pretty things). I'm also considering including sections on preparing fleeces, spinning, dyeing, etc.

I guess what I'm wondering is what sort of things would you want to knit? What sort of budget do think most homestead crafters would be working with? I have a personal tendency as a hand-dyer to work with expensive yarns and am considering that it might be better to use more affordable and accessible yarns like Lion Brand, Patons, Red Heart, etc. At the same time I feel that some homesteaders may prefer to work with natural fibers only. Any other suggestions?
 

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Not meaning to toss a wet blanket on an idea but now that it is so easy to learn from vids I can't imagine learning the basics from a book. With videos I can knit right along with the person and see exactly what they are doing. Books can be harder to learn from than vids, at least in my experience.
 

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Welcome to The Fold Bamblefir!

Homesteaders tend to be a pretty crafty and creative bunch. I'm not sure what your idea of "fluff" is but I'm not sure I would consider anything I make as frivolous or "fluff". Even the toys are well used and loved and what child doesn't need a soft lovey toy :), mittens, hats, scarves, and socks. Sweaters are always welcome, depending on your climate. What I needed and used more of was very different in Northern Minnesota than it is in Southwest Michigan. Then there is FR who lived in Ill. And knits sweaters and stuff that an Eskimo would be happy to wear :shrug: I think useful items are a relative and dependant thing.

As for fiber content, lots of people are allergic or sensitive to certain natural fibers. Sometimes it is the chemicals used to process the fibers/yarn. Certain fibers just aren't approperate for some knitted things. I suppose you would have to first define what you consider practical homesteader items. Are you writing your own patterns?

I have learned tha homesteaders come from every walk of life. There are some that have a very healthy income, some live by scraping by, there is no way to generalize. Yarn and yarn content can almost always be substituted so I'm not sure it would be necessary to differentiate.

I wish you luck!
 

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I sell knitting patterns and find that if someone wants to use a cheap yarn instead of what you specify, they will. It is more important that they match the needles to the weight of the yarn and learn not to pull every stitch tight in an effort to make the stitches even. You might knit up several small items, like hats, out of different yarns, toss them in a top loader and dryer and show them what happens to different yarns.

If you include a little felted bag, suggesting a feltable yarn and instructions, you’ll have something that other beginner books do not have.

A practical item would be a hot pad. This would be a good felted project as well. I’d have several items that work well in a garter stitch.

There are lots of knitting books out there, u-tube has not killed the market. However, you should put your own very professional video on u-tube for something beginners find difficult and use it to advertise your book.
 

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Thanks for the responses everyone!

A bit of info about me: I have been knitting, crocheting, spinning, and dyeing for years now. I also design patterns, have taught classes, and run an online yarn shop (that accounts for 100% of our household income).

What I'm planning is less of a "and this is how you do a purl stitch" and more of a guide to using your own gauge swatch and body measurements (where applicable) to create each project. After thinking about it more last night it really doesn't matter what yarn I use because of the way I intend to write the patterns. A thorough guide to substituting yarns and selecting needle sizes would definitely have to be included!
 

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Modifiable projects, my favourite kind!

I can recommend Smashwords as an ebook publisher - and I'll be happy to help if you need any assistance with formatting ... just PM me!
 

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Bramblefir what is your yarn store called? I think you should not suggest affordable commercial yarns for your book just because they may be considered more practical. Most knitters or crocheters have their own yarn preference anyway and will use what they want regardless of what you used to list the pattern. As long as you list the weight it will work out fine. And even though I am 29 and live on the computer I do not like to watch etutorials and prefer books myself - but I could be the exception lol. FYI I love the fiber yarns myself and only use them when making items for myself or family and many who love fiber might likely be the same.
 
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