Confused

Discussion in 'Goats' started by dezeeuwgoats, Jan 15, 2007.

  1. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    I had the weirdest thing happen today.

    I was warming the milk to run through the cream separator. I actually was beginning to pour the milk and turn the handle on the separator, when I got a call from my husband who was having truck trouble. So, I put the milk back in the fridge, and had the kids wash up the dishes/separator. I went and picked up DH.

    I came home, about an hour and a half later and put the milk back on the stove to reheat. I looked at it and it looked thick. I thought to myself, wow this milk is really creamy! I stuck a clean finger in it - it felt thick. I tipped the pot, and it was thick all the way down......it looked like cheese!

    I'm straining it right now. I don't know what happened. I asked the boys - thinking maybe they were playing a prank on me. Nope. I thought maybe that pot wasn't cleaned thoroughly after making cheese last time. Nope - dear hubby insists that HE cleaned that pot immaculately. I'm totally, completely, and 'udderly' stumped.

    Niki
     
  2. Hip_Shot_Hanna

    Hip_Shot_Hanna Well-Known Member

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    It sort of sounds like cheese too! How does it taste? If it's thick like that, you can cut the curd like a tic tac toe board, then slant cut through those to make cubes, heat a bit, then pour off the whey and drain the curds for cottage cheese.
     

  3. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    It's cheese. Weird.

    I went ahead and made ricotta from the whey also. I guess I'll have to wait a few more days to use the cream separator. I don't know what happened. The only thing I can think of is that the kids didn't clean the whisk thoroughly and that there was dried rennet on that. Spontaneous cheese - who'd of thought?

    Niki
     
  4. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You make it sound so easy. lol. (I assume it did not have colostrum in it?)
    mary
     
  5. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like you made Devonshire Cream. No rennet needed.
     
  6. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    What is Devonshire cream? I'd like to know how to make that - it sounds delicious.

    This is like cheese - a simple farm cheese. It isn't creamy at all. It is solid and slice-able. I cut it into 2" chunks, salted it, and put it in the fridge.

    I've made lots of cheese before - just never had 'spontaneous' cheese. It was bizarre. No colostrum in the milk at all - everyone kidded over a month ago. Just another strange thing to add to my list of goat cheese experiments, er I mean 'experiences'. lol

    Niki
     
  7. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    Clotted Cream:

    Also know as Devonshire or Devon Cream. It is a thick, rich, yellowish cream with a scalded or cooked flavor that is made by heating unpasteurized milk until a thick layer of cream sit on top. The milk is cooled and the layer of cream is skimmed off.

    Traditionally served with tea and scones in England.

    RECIPE:
    Title: MAKING YOUR OWN DEVONSHIRE OR CLOTTED CREAM
    Categories: Misc, British
    Yield: 1 servings


    In winter, let fresh, unpasteurized cream stand 12 hours, (in summer,
    about 6 hours) in a heat-proof dish. Then put the cream on to heat -
    the lower the heat the better. It must never boil, as this will
    coagulate the albumen and ruin everything. When small rings or
    undulations form on the surface, the cream is sufficiently scalded.
    Remove at once from heat and store in a cold place at least 12 hours.
    Then skim the thick, clotted cream and serve it very cold as a
    garnish for berries, or spread on scones and top with jam.

    OR:

    CLOTTED CREAM:

    Clotted cream or Devonshire cream is a thick cream made by slowly heating rich, unpasteurized milk to about 82 degrees Centigrade and holding it that temperature for about an hour. A very thick, yellow layer of clots or coagulated clumps of cream forms on the top. It has a minimum fat content of 55 percent. It is a traditional accompaniment to the English 'cream tea,' served with jam and scones.



    Creme Fraiche:

    It is a matured, thickened cream that has a slightly tangy, nutty flavor and velvety rich texture. The thickness can range from that of commercial sour cream to almost as solid as room temperature margarine. In France, the cream is unpasteurized and therefore contains the bacteria necessary to thicken it naturally. In America, where all commercial cream is pasteurized, the fermenting agents necessary can be obtained by adding buttermilk or sour cream.

    It is used as a dessert topping and in cooked sauces and soups, where it has the advantage of not curdling when boiled.

    CRÈME FRAICHE: [krehm FRESH]

    This matured, thickened cream has a slightly tangy, nutty flavor and velvety rich texture. The thickness of crème fraîche can range from that of commercial sour cream to almost as solid as room-temperature margarine.

    Crème fraîche and sour cream can be used interchangeably in most recipes, but Crème fraîche has two advantages over sour cream: it can be whipped like whipping cream, and it will not curdle if boiled.

    In France, where crème fraîche is a specialty, the cream is unpasteurized and therefore contains the bacteria necessary to thicken it naturally. In America, where all commercial cream is pasteurized, the fermenting agents necessary for crème fraîche can be obtained by adding buttermilk or sour cream. Crème fraîche is the ideal addition for sauces or soups because it can be boiled without curdling. It's delicious spooned over fresh fruit or other desserts such as warm cobblers or puddings or used in truffle recipes.

    Crème fraîche is sold in some gourmet markets. If you can't find it, it's so easy to make an equally delicious crème fraîche version at home: recipes.



    ENJOY!
     
  8. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    Jillis - thanks!

    I definately will try some of those recipes - they sound wonderful. I ended up with plain old farm cheese - nothing rich, silky, or spreadable as those sounded. I'm going to print out the above post and save it with my cheese recipes.

    Niki