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gracie88
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everybody. I have not found any shows to gawk at so I am back. What I'd like to do is post some pics of my admittedly mutt dairy/brush goats and have others critique them and post pics of theirs for compare/contrast. (I'll show you mine if you'll show me yours :p )

OK, here goes:
Shirley (lamancha x alpine 1 yr)




and Laverne (lamancha x oberhasli 1.5 yr)




So there they are. I will note that Laverne is standing on a slope, her back is actually roughly level. Feel free to be critical, I won't tell them :)
 

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theres a online goatshow i can send you the link if you want it.

heres what i think about you does:

Shirley, looks to have a level top line, pretty level rump, good pasturens, longer lean neck then the other doe. By the looks of her back end she is a little hocky, and has nice size teats for a junior doe.

Laverne, has more body capcity, nice pasturens, she is not as level and her rump is more down hill. I think if set up she would have a better rump. I can tell she was nice sharp withers. In the photo she is very hocky.

with a set up photo you can tell more about their conformation
 

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gracie88
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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, I would love the link, thanks. How do you set them up? What's hocky?
 

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here is the link: http://coondog.tobiahost.com/index.php?

heres a photo of one of my junior does set up (i know her fore legs are pointing out to much in front of her)



here is a photo of her back legs.


hocks are like the joint in the back leg. In the photo of your goat the hocks(the joint) is going and almost touching. You want to spead their back legs apart to the where they would naturaly be.
 

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gracie88
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Discussion Starter #6
"I used to own Lenny and Squiggy!!"
:rotfl: :D :rotfl:
 

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Actually you can tell more about a goat by the way they stand naturally (i.e, not set up). This, obviously, is why people pose their goats, to show them to the best advantage and to try to hide any faults the animal might have.

I'm going to be very honest with you, I don't like the rump width on these girls, or the width throughout on the Alpine/LaMancha cross. The Ober-LaMancha cross has better strength IMHO, but they are probably both going to have a triangular shaped udder when viewed from the rear. They both toe out in the front and their hocks turn in at the rear, a set of triats that go together in my experience.

They aren't poor quality does, they are good starter animals and they have a lot going for them. If they were mine, the first traits I would work on would be width in the rear end- between the legs, rump width, escutcheon width, and try not to sacrifice the decent rear leg angulation that they have. After that you could aim for a more nearly level rump. They are similar in a lot of ways, I take it that they have the same sire or are otherwise closely related?
 

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gracie88
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Discussion Starter #8
Yeah, apparently the local 4-H group all had access to a lamancha buck :) I almost did not get them because of the ears but I think I'm hooked now.

Thanks, Chamoisee, for being honest. It's much more educational than otherwise. Here is another question. If I breed these girls for dairy (was thinking meat but reconsidering my options), is it better to stick to one breed? Could I breed their offspring up to purebred status or is it better to just find the best dairy buck I can, regardless of breed since they are crossbred already? And, is it ok to drift in my own thread? :D
 

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Thread drift is fine, it's your own thread! Besides, conformation of a doe you already have is meaningless except in the context of culling her or breeding her!

I recommend breeding to a good quality LaMancha buck if the earlessness doesn't bother you. Why? Because, LaManchas are the only breed with an open herd book, and they're unusually accepting of grade and American animals. You can breed these girls up to purebred! That can't be done in any other dairy breed that I know of in the U.S. Also, LaMancha blood is diverse enough that you'll be able to select what you need, whereas the Ober blood is limited and difficult to acheieve your goals (but this could also be done with Alpine blood which is also diverse). These two are 50% LM, the next generation, if bred back, will be 75%, and their doelings will be American LM. In three years, you can have American LaManchas and show them in the LaMancha class.

Now- because the LaMancha blood is diverse (liek the Alpines), if it were me, I would select for one group of traits at a time, try to keep your herd similar in type and style, and linebreed a little bit so that what you get will be consistent and predictable.

That's what I'd do! :)
 
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