Concrete Curing Compound?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by SouthernThunder, Jul 22, 2006.

  1. SouthernThunder

    SouthernThunder Well-Known Member

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    I am going to be pouring a footing and 6" wall on one part of my property that has no access to water. Temps here have been around 100 degrees the past few days and I know these are less than ideal conditions for curing.

    I was wondering what you folks would suggest here. A spray-on curing compound, or burlap and plastic sheets. Which is gonna be cheaper and which is gonna be the most effective? Also, has anyone ever tried using waste motor oil as a release agent on plywood forms? Thanks!
     
  2. ace admirer

    ace admirer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    for the most part the curing "compound" is not a compound at all, its just a sealer that tries to keep the moisture from evaporating from the concrete. if you're absolutely are not going to be around during the cure stage. its ok but expensive. plastic is probably better. if you are around to keep surface moist with a fog from a hose or something. then drop cloths, straw, about anything that will keep sun off and hold moisture would be fine. , plastic is probably less work and cheapest.
     

  3. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    I have use mixtures for pouring concrete when temps are below 10F. But I have never used anything when pouring concrete with temps above freezing.

    I do use a lot of micro-fibres in my concrete. I really live the stuff and how it changes the concrete's abilities.

    I would say to just cover it with burlap [or any cheap fabric drop clothes] and wet it down.

    Good luck.
     
  4. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Wouldn't Calcium Chloride added to the mix accomplish the same quick set requiremant as if it were cold? Cold is dry.
     
  5. wheeezil

    wheeezil Well-Known Member

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    diesel fuel for release oil on plywood
     
  6. ace admirer

    ace admirer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    chloride is an add mixture to prevent freezing. not really the same as curing compound.
     
  7. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    IF its a footing and a wall . the hydration should'nt' be that bad on the wall since it will still have the forms on it. IF you use plastic make sure it isn't black. But I never heard of covering a footer. But if I was going to I would use sawdust. It will stay wet longer than anything. But if you have no water its moot point. I would think with the footer in the ground it will stay relatively cool. Now a slab is a whole different animal
     
  8. Okie-Dokie

    Okie-Dokie Well-Known Member

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    Want to slow down the drying process? Ice. Call the batch man and ask him to have ice put in the drum to cool it down so i don't set up so fast. Need to have something to make sure the forms release easy? Form oil. Not the same thing as diesel and costs more, but it works best.