Colonial Pennsylvania UPDATE...

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by palongrifle, Nov 11, 2004.

  1. palongrifle

    palongrifle Active Member

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    Pennsylvania
    The timber surveyor is going to look at the property (259 acres) and offer a price. He says he pays half upfront which I can use for my down payment.

    Found that the back acreage has coal on it - super. I need to get that half million price tag down a bit before I "risk it all".

    Been researching log hewn construction as well as the actual dimensions of Fort Vanango (approx. 60' x 60', plus bastions). Perfect size to put our 6 workshops in. This was a Horizontal log structure for the buildings and the opposing walls and bastions were vertical 10" poles.

    Went to the property today - seems over the years the locals have been using areas as their dumping ground (truck cabs, deer carcasses, washing machines, ect.). This indicates to me that the current owners haven't been around much and this will truely lower my offering price. First line of business - clean up the dump.

    I plan to soon borrow a digital cam so I can show potential homesteaders a view of my dream as use as a recruiting tool. Besides, how can I just ask families to join me "sight unseen".

    Property tax is based on the number of permanent structures. Most homes and workshops will be 16' x 16' on skids - aka "temporary structure".

    More news later as I get it - stay tuned - same Bat Time, same Bat Channel
     
  2. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    I ain't moving to New York, but now you've got me curious about a couple things.

    Assuming the timber cruiser goes out and finds that there is considerable valuable timber on the place... what's to prevent him from buying the property himself? Or turn one of his buddies on to it? Happens here all the time. Someone will buy the land for the timber, rape it, split it into 20 acre pieces and sell it to some desperate soul from out of town.

    I ask because it sounds like you haven't made a deal on the property yet, but are just speculating on how you can make it pay for itself without putting any money down.

    Or maybe I'm just not getting what you're saying, since I pretty much remember that in an earlier post you mentioned already having come into the money to pay for this dream.
     

  3. palongrifle

    palongrifle Active Member

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    Why would you move to New York to experience Colonial Pennsylvania?

    The "timber cruiser" is an Amish friend that makes his living as a timber scaler. He is not interested in the property, just what grows on it. The "raping" is done by only two pairs of draft horses and the impact on the soil is kept to a mininum. Not much market in saplings around here - yet.

    I intend on using the payment of the timber for my downpayment. I'll mortgage the rest. When timbering actually takes place (which will last several months because the horses are much slower than log skidders), the payments I receive will be used to pay the monthly payments. This will also allow me time to get my house sold. The back 20 acres has coal on it and will not interfere with the functioning of the fort and its settlers.

    You pretty much remember correctly also that I have come up with the funds for property but I have just been notified of another property adjoining the original site coming up for sale - thus increasing not only the size of the dream but also the price tag.
     
  4. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    Get 3 or 4 estimates from different logging contractors.

    In my home town, there was a man that owned 80 acres. His property was only 1/4 mile from that of a logging contractor. He knew the logging contractor for 20 years. They drank together, socialized together and were very good friends.
    One day, the man decided he wanted his property logged. His neighbor, the logging contractor offered him $5000 to select cut the timber on the 80 acres and they reached tentative agreement (though nothing signed). Another logging contractor in town got wind of the sale....and asked the landowner if he could cruise the timber and give a bid. The landowner agreed. The bid was a bid by the cord/by the 1000 feet that ranged between $20,000 and $25,000.

    Remember, you can have your property logged once in a generation....at most.
     
  5. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Musta been an earlier comment of yours I was thinkining about, the regional area of Pennsylvania, New York and something else.

    It's all the same to me... New York.
     
  6. stonerebel

    stonerebel Well-Known Member

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    georgia
    Palongrifle I must have missed out on your idea for the property, but it sounds good. What got you interested in this project and do you have anybody who is interested in the project? I like a person who dreams big and has a glass half full attitude.
     
  7. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

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    "Found that the back acreage has coal on it - super. I need to get that half million price tag down a bit before I "risk it all"



    If you do find it, protect yourself. The EPA will have thier hands all over it, you and the media.
     
  8. palongrifle

    palongrifle Active Member

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    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Stonerebel -
    Thanks for the interest. I have been into historical re-enacting for the last 8 years as a member of the Jefferson County Longrifles. We make our own buckskins, throw tomahawks, cook, camp in tee pees ect. After watching such shows as "Frontier House" and "Colonial House" I just thought it would be really cool to try this. The past several years re-enacting has kinda calmed the bug to just "pack up and do it". I live in an area of great history but the historical parks and museums are all hours south of me (Ft.Pitt, Neccessity, Ligoneir). I studied everything I can get my hands on about the more local history - especially along the Allegheny River.

    I do have other families interested in the project but until the deed is in hand I don't want to get anyones hopes up - including my own. I plan on advertising more intensively to find artisans/pioneers/re-enactors and families that feel the same as I do. I'll keep everyone posted.

    Almostthere -
    There is another coal mine nearbye the property. I intend on approaching them because obviously they know how to handle the EPA. But your right, if Uncle Sam thinks someone else is making any money - he wants his too.