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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen quite a few references to these in the last week or so. We have one from our camping days and I asked DH to dig it out Saturday. When I had our wood stove, the small sized Dutchwest Catalytic model, in its optimal heating mode, the oven wouldn't go over 250o. I thought the thermometer might be faulty and put in a regular oven thermometer inside with the same reading.

Obviously you can't really "bake" at these temperatures. Has anybody had similar experience with the Coleman oven or have you had it hot enough to bake?

Thanks for your input.
 

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What is the best way to get an accurate temperature reading from the top of my woodstove?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, Cheryl, if I were doing something wrong, I wanted to know. If this is typical of the Coleman oven, I didn't want anybody buying one if it wouldn't live up to expectations.

Our stove has a catalytic combustor with its own thermometer. When that thermometer was registering 1300o F., I tested the Coleman oven and it was hotter than I wanted to stand near, even though it was cold and blustery outside yesterday. Pans of water I had set on the outer part of the top, not the raised "cooking" surface, were at a boil.

Ovsfarm, you might try putting a cast iron or other covered pot on your stove with an oven thermometer in it for 15 min or so. I've also read something about putting flour in a Dutch oven and the temperature was relative to how quickly the flour browned. I can't for the life of me remember where I saw that. Also, there is something about how long you can stand to put your hand so many inches from a hot surface that will gauge how hot it is. Also can't remember specifics or where I found the info.
 

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Mine only gets up to about 250F if I use a single burner. I have a two-burner camp stove and it gets plenty hot if I "straddle it" on both burners. The campfire grate also gets it hot enough although I have to be careful not to burn whatever I'm cooking on the bottom.

I love my Coleman camp oven and use it alongside my dutch oven for baking. But normally only for biscuits, cornbread or single loafs of bread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi, Jan. I'm guessing you were addressing me?

I had wanted to use it on the wood stove against the day the power goes out, or I'm just plain too cheap to use the kitchen propane range top. Our oven is electric. Anyway the reviews did indicate that the oven was designed to use over their stove's burner. Oh, well. Now I know.

Oddly enough, I have a small reflector oven that I have set in front of the wood stove and it gets enough radiant energy through the glass door to bake biscuits and yeast rolls. But when I say it's a small reflector oven, I mean SMALL. I think I can bake 8 biscuits in it--forget a muffin pan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Cheryl, ours has a baffle to spread out the incoming hot air that just covers a large hole in the bottom. My guess is that if it were removed and you tried to bake in the oven as designed over a burner, the food would burn on the bottom before it was done on top.

I need to play with--er, ah, test--a cast iron pot on that stove for baking. I am fairly adept at baking in one over a bed of coals but just need to develop skill with an alternate method.

Thanks for all the responses.
 

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I have one of the callapsible coleman ovens very much like the ones at walmart, but mine dates from the 50's. It has a hole in the bottom with a baffle about 1/2 inch above it. I have only used it over a coleman stove and propane stove, so I can only comment on that. I have no problem getting the temp up to 350. A couple things to keep in mind here:
1. I use a small square pan that just fits in side the oven, because it is thin I had trouble burning the bottom of my biscuits and cornbread (not good!). I folded a peice of crumpled tin-foil (I still miss that hat) to create some air spaces between layers, put it under my pan and stopped the problem. Later at home I made a double layer sheet metal pan to put under the biscuit pan and it works great.
2. My oven has some large vent holes on top and I found that when I covered them with foil to slow down the heat loss it was easier to regulate my temperature. I might add that it cost me another fine hat and its no wonder the aliens know what i'm up to (lol).
3. You really have to watch these ovens close, if you just walk away when the temp looks right you may returnto biscuits that are more remeniscent of charcoal briquets. Make flame adjustments small, it takes a few minutes for the temp guage to resister the change.

I wouldn't take anything for my oven, it works really well and since my grandfather passed it to me before he left the field, it has a lot of good memories.
 

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Coleman camp ovens were made to use over a burner, not a woodstove. If you want to bake using a woodstove, do the baking inside of the woodstove...using a dutch oven....after the fire has burned down to coals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hi, Cabin Fever. I found that tidbit re: the oven's being designed to work over a coleman stove burner in the reviews Jan in CO mentioned.

The woodstove idea is great except that our stove's access door is not quite 9" wide. The front door has two little andirons that would make that a cumbersome approach as well. Besides, when our stove burns down to coals, it's not effectively heating the house. Thanks for your ideas though. I'll just have to drop back and punt, I guess.
 
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