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What do you wear in cold weather?I'm curious about tradditional vs.hi-tech clothing,traditional wool,Carhartt's.etc vs.the modern fabrics,fleece,Gore-Tex,capiline,etc.I've only worn low-tech clothing,Carhartts and sweats,I plow snow in the winter,well not this winter and while it dosen't get as cold as where some of you live it does stay in the teens for a while and has gone down to -10,the old school stuff seemed to work fine.The New School clothing seems to be expensive,noisy and from what I understan,flamable.Whats your experience?
 

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Master Of My Domain
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weight and durability. they new stuff is generally lighter but less durable.
 

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For me, in cold weather I wear insulated carhart coveralls (the ones with the red lining) with knit shirt and jeans underneath. Wool socks and waterproof boots. Wool stocking hat and several pairs of gloves thru the day if it is wet out. Generally works just fine.

Robert
 

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I have used both.

The newer, lighter stuff is nice, but for me, does not keep you warm for long periods of time. Also, it seems to snag on just about anything.

I prefer the Carhartt type stuff. It is heavier, but much warmer for longer periods of time, and last soooo very much longer.
 

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Both types of winter gear is used here in Alaska.
There is sort like the everyday carharts which as it get colder becomes insulated one like the Logbuilder says.
butt
those who work out doors for hours/days do use the high tec stuff
Bunny boots The special stuff has fancy names.
I just get cold but then again I am not in the really cold area and then again I am not running a team of dogs or working in the oil fields.
 

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I have a woolrich wool zipper coat (the kind with the big pocket in the back for a duck). I've felted it just a tad(on purpose) and it is warm and breathable works great. I also have a sweater that is so warm I can only wear it under 32'. Love to get some wool pants someday.

All that stuff is NOT flammable by the way.

And I have a down vest, basically lots of layers to build up.

THat wool coat even works fine in a light to med rain.

Love that duofold long johns--cotton on the inside, wool on the outside. Also have the red union "santa/miner" suit to slepe in when it gets real cold.
 

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My husband wears insulated Carhartt coveralls. I bought my insulated coveralls at a barn sale. I bet they are 40 years old (They look like the ones Gomer Pyle wore!), but they are still warm. No idea what brand they are. My barn coat is down, and my town coat is wool. I can't wear wool right next to the skin, so I wear hunting socks made of high tech stuff. I think they are the warmest. I like thinsulate lined leather gloves because they are warm, and can get wet. I wear my old pair in the barn, and have a new pair for town. We like the old and the new, I guess.
 

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I always have a problem finding clothes to keep me warm. I get cold easy. I have a pair of pants that are soft on the inside, and parachute like on the outside. they keep me warm, commando, down to about 30 in strong wind. Problem is, these were yardsale pants. I cant find them anywhere. The tag says polar wind. does anyone have a clue?

I also have a pair of arctic overalls from Gander MT. they were 45 bucks. they are not soft inside, but if you wear them over jeans, you are sweltering, unless the temp stays below freezing. But I dont like, because you have to remove your shoes to take them off.

Ive never found shoes that keep my toes warm, even with wool socks. :rolleyes:
 

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I wear silk Long Johns underneath because they add almost no bulk and are nice and soft. They add an amazing amount of extra insulation.

Wool sweaters, wool socks gloves hats, around the barn I wear dh's discarded insulated hunting coveralls.

We bought these beastly looking boots that are rated down to 30 below and they do keep your feet and toes warm ---- as long as they were warm when you put them on....
Sometimes when I get them muddy, I leave them outside the door and if I put them on after they've been outside awhile, they hold the cold IN...

I still wish i could get the old-fashioned mukluks I had when I was in the military...
 

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BASIC said:
What do you wear in cold weather?I'm curious about tradditional vs.hi-tech clothing,traditional wool,Carhartt's.etc vs.the modern fabrics,fleece,Gore-Tex,capiline,etc.I've only worn low-tech clothing,Carhartts and sweats,I plow snow in the winter,well not this winter and while it dosen't get as cold as where some of you live it does stay in the teens for a while and has gone down to -10,the old school stuff seemed to work fine.The New School clothing seems to be expensive,noisy and from what I understan,flamable.Whats your experience?

I love Carhartt: tough as nails and warm. I have a red union suit, complete with flap that I bought at Farm & Fleet and I feel darned sexy in it. I promise not to post pictures. :baby04: I have a Columbia ski jacket that I use on the snowmobile that I bought on sale at Kohl's and snow overalls that I bought at F&F for under 20 bucks. I have Sorel snow boats with felt lining that are great in the cold. For knocking around the farm the most important thing is layers, not high tech. I like both the Columbia jacket and Carhartt, but the Carhartt is more practical unless I am riding the trails or skiing. Cold weather is easy: you can always put on more layers and be comfortable. I hate hot climates because you can be naked and still be miserable.
 

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Down-filled jacket, ski pants; fur hat with flaps; silk turtlenecks; assorted high and low-tech insulated 'long jills' . Insoles as well as liners in the Sorels. Occasionally use the heat packs in socks. Absolutely have to layer things wisely. Mittens for me are the most important thing -- wool gloves underneath leather mitts if it's really cold. I'll use what's handy! And have a good selection, as the most important thing seems to be to have a DRY change of clothing always available - dry socks especially.
 

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Just a couple guidelines:

If there is a good chance of getting wet...wear as much wool as possible. Wool is warm even when wet.

If there is any chance of catching fire...wear as much natural fabric as possible (wool, cotton, silk). There's nothing like trying to clean melted nylon, melted polyester or melted polypropylene out of third degree burns.
 

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If you have a military surplus store, go check there. I got a coat & pants set of some sort there, I think it's some sort of chemical suit but it is SUPER warm, I can't wear the pants in the house or I get overheated. I wear longjohns or sweats underneath and I can go out in ANYTHING.

I'm a big fan of military stuff, everything else seems to not be quite as good. Though carhartt stuff is pretty good but I haven't tried any of their warm weather clothing aside from a sweatshirt, I just have their workpants.

Merino wool socks. They are thinner than regular wool but just as warm.
 

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If I'm doing something active, like clearing snow, I wear a pair of insulated bibs ( mine are walls brand, I didn't want to spring for the carharts) over a pair of normal pants, a t-shirt and a medium weight fleece jacket. Regular cotton socks and a pair of rocky's insulated boots. Leather insulated gloves. Also a stocking cap, though that often goes in my pocket after I work up some steam. This is the same gear I wear when I'm hunting and we're driving game or doing a lot of walking.

On stand, when I'm just sitting, I add a down jacket and a carhart parka, swap the stocking hat for a fleece hat with a face shield attached, throw on a pair of long john's and wool socks with synthetic liner socks underneath. I also use thick wool fingerless gloves with a detachable mitten piece that pulls over the fingers. On top of all that I also use those little hand and foot warmers.

I'm amazed at how much colder I get when I'm sitting still. The first time I did a drive, I kept the down jacket on. It was soaked through in half an hour from the walking.

I like a mix of normal clothes and synthetics. Polar fleece seems to have a lot of the same properties as wool. It keeps me warm even if it's damp. Plus it's light and quiet.
The synthetic liner socks are great. They wick moisture away from your feet and keep them dry. also very thin and light.
 
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I wear flannel lined jeans, a cotton t-shirt, a long sleeved cotton shirt, and a blanket lined button up shirt. This combination will keep me comfortable in temps down to 0, or 10 below as long as the wind is not blowing, and Im moving around. When the wind starts picking up I grab my arctic lined carhart.

Saturday I was helpiing my brother stack some firewood. THe temp was about 15 degrees. I took my blanket lined shirt off, and just worked in the t-shirt, and long sleeved shirt. I was almost to warm then.

I start sweating when temps get above about 55. I was born way to far south.

the good thing about below freezing temps is it's dry. A person can stay pretty cofortable if they stay dry.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for the response.Do you have any specific recomendations on long underwear and wool clothing?The hi-tech clothing is eaisy to find anywhere but not the traditional clothing.i tried a jacket polartec 300 on,I didn't think it was any warmer than my Carhartt hooded seatshirt,but it sure was more expensive and looked alot less durable.
 

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carhartt artic wear when it is really cold and blanket lined when it is temperate.
 

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I bought some wool pants (army gear from Europe) for 10 bucks or less from Fleet Farm (2 pairs) Not as "classy" as Carharts, but cheap and very durable. I love wool, it takes a beating, doesn't really get stinky. Good stuff. Haven't been able to find a wool man thong yet?
 
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