Coccidia,born or ingested?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by DandeeRose, Jan 14, 2018.

  1. DandeeRose

    DandeeRose Well-Known Member

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    I recently read in a book [Raising Rabbits by Ann Kanable] that some people say rabbits are born without coccidia, but acquire it through eating their parents droppings\chewing on their cage.However,I can't find any information that shows this being correct or incorrect.Does anyone have any information or thoughts on this?
     
  2. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    Coccidia in all species that I'm aware of are fecal-oral pathogens. They are ingested in the environment for most species. Rabbits additionally are coprophagic, eating a very specific feces produced usually at night. Young rabbits do eat their dam's feces as part of normal behavior, so this would be an potential route. Another likely route is simply environmental contamination especially in cages with fecal buildup or solid bottom cages. Wire cages drastically reduce the risk, but it is still possible if there is fecal buildup in the corners.
     
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  3. Ray

    Ray Well-Known Member

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    i do not know where the coccidia parasite first infects from? but I learned long ago to do preventative medicine in my animals! whether it be rabbitsm chickens, cattle etc. Years ago when I first started raising rabbits. I quickly accumulated quite a few! started selling meat rabbits. Some got coccidiosis which is easy to see when butchering! It shows up as white or yellow? like spots on the liver! I found online Vet college medicine said you should use a product called pour on calf ivormecton! 1 drop on the kanp of the kneck for each three pounds of live animal weight. This is not an advertisement for any specific brand of ivormecton! just that if you treat you rabbits once every three to six months You probably won't have any problem with coccidiosis! It also removes and prevents ear mites! just use the drops inside the ears instead of on the neck! a small bottle. 8-16 oz. will last years in a small rabbitery! I use a medicine called, corid on my poultry. in the water for the feathered ones. ivormecton on the cattle down the back as directed. I never have any problems with coccidiosis any more as the years have taught me prevention is SO MUCH EASIER!! than trying to treat something your not sure of? I hope you have as much enjoyment out of your animals as me and my family have had! they give love freely! without expectation! just the way God intended! I believe! best wishes ray!
     
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  4. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    Ivermectin will not treat coccidia in any species. Liver spots can be caused by several diseases.

    The life cycle of coccidia is well known. It is ubiquitous and a fecal-oral pathogen. There are many strains and most cause little to no clinical disease, while a select few are moderately pathogenic and a few others are highly pathogenic and devastating. Parent stock are carriers and young stock are exposed in the environment. Environmental cleanliness is of utmost importance for control.
     
  5. haypoint

    haypoint Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate Supporter

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