co community with a twist

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by to live free, Jan 9, 2005.

  1. to live free

    to live free Well-Known Member

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    If you had a chance to start a "new community" would you?

    A community where you all live, kinda like it was in the 1780's or 1860's
    before life got complicated with factory jobs and desocialization of the american people. a community where it is almost like a living history only with some modern touches. A place where friends would help you build a timber frame house and raise crops. Do you think people would leave a life of living under a political system gone sour, to live in a new place free from the influance of sour system.
     
  2. Shygal

    Shygal Unreality star Supporter

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    Didnt I just see a movie about this last summer? :rolleyes:
     

  3. to live free

    to live free Well-Known Member

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  4. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    Not only NO, but H**L NO! LOL I like having antibiotics, hot and cold running water, modern toilets and sanitation. Not to mention medical care, for not only me but my animals.

    And then there's the superstitions that abounded back then! Not on your life! Being burned at the stake is NOT my idea of a hot party! LOL(ahem...not that I party you understand.... :haha: ).


    LQ
     
  5. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    :haha: :haha: Shygal I just watched that last night. "The Village"........I think I would pass on the offer. I need elbow room and I know I wouldn't be able to follow orders very well. :eek:
     
  6. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    Let's see....1780's..just post Revolutionary War. 1860's...here comes the Civil War...I think not. I prefer the stress I have now.

    Meg :)
     
  7. Madame

    Madame Well-Known Member Supporter

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  8. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Sounds like Utopia. I think it has been tried quite a few times already. Nothing new at all. And it has never worked. I'll pass, thank you.
     
  9. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    I began to notice that the American mindset of "independence" is a significant attitude that prevents a lot of homesteaders from succeeding.

    Ironically, independence is a complete fallacy and unachievable, although the paycheck to paycheck set doesn't seem to be aware that they don't have it.
    And lots of homesteading "dreamers" think they'll move out to the country and do it all.

    I remember a recent thread where someone had his undies flamed because he didn't want to carry home insurance, and instead hoped he could count on his neighbors help in the event of disaster.
    They basically accused him of being some kind of freeloader. The importance of neighborly give and take was beyond them, apparently.
    My grandmother used to call this being pea-brained.

    You will never be a real homesteader if you have to payout big bucks to insurance industries and others. You can get around that, and even keep a sense of security, if you are willing to cooperate with like minded others.
    I think I understand what you're asking. Yes, I would love to have a "true" community rather than a Wal-mart down the road.
    I want to get out from under the nine to five corporate slave lifestyle, eliminate the food provider middleman and all that. I will attend a barn raising for my neighbor if that is the puny cost. :)
     
  10. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    Don't the Amish basically live this way???

    Isn't it kind of the idyllic life quite a few would-be homesteaders desire?

    Minus the religion quite a few would think it good....

    Relying on neighbors instead of an insurance company sounds nice enough.
     
  11. inc

    inc Well-Known Member

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    "I want to get out from under the nine to five corporate slave lifestyle, eliminate the food provider middleman and all that. I will attend a barn raising for my neighbor if that is the puny cost."

    the land values in this country have skyrocketed- beyond the value of anything that you could produce on that land.the only profit you can make anymore is developing it or splittin it up for such purpose.
    you have to have insurance, etc, and the other stuff because your neighbors are not going ot take care of you. even family in some cases will not take care of you. you are truly on your own.

    i think i very much have missed the boat as far as settleing myself anyway- those my age who have been lucky enough to grab onto a decent paying career when they were in thier young prime, are buying up homes here to invest, and live in.

    i wonder if ther eis some place in the world other than USA where you could live such a simple and debt free, if moneyless, life. i was thinking years ago of where to get away from it, when it just seemed the problems here were insurmountable....
    if i may ask on this thread, where would you go? is there such a place that doesnt require a lot of money to live????
     
  12. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    Never seen the Village...so no clue how it ended :rolleyes:

    However, I think a person could do it within the community they live in currently, at least to a certain extent. I think that's how our government tends to think it works, although we put money into taxes instead of into each other. It's harder to contribute to the nameless, faceless among us than to our neighborhood.

    Listen, I belong to a soapmaking forum that did the most incredible thing for me this Christmas. My husband had bought me the nicest digital camera last year, but it was stolen a few months ago. Since he's unemployed now, there was no way we could replace it. Nearly 50 people pitched in and bought me a new one. I've never met these folks, but they still did something for me that I'll never forget.

    Imagine if we could duplicate that with just a half dozen neighbors...Mary makes the jelly, Bob donates some hay to a new neighbor, Jerry and Marge trade a pig for some veggies from Joe... It really just takes having folks willing enough to make a small sacrifice to begin the process. And when someone is sick, or unemployed, the rest of the group pitches in and pays the power bill or mends the fence. And it's not an act of charity, it's an act of love and caring for one's neighbors, the way we all wish others cared about us.

    JMHO :)
     
  13. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    The 2 main things I would miss is my truck which I could live without, and not being able to talk with family on the phone. The Amish have the right idea in my book.

    I am getting so tired of the rude people.

    Recently I held the door for a woman not once but twice , did she say thanks ? Nope but I am sure she would have said something if I slammed it in her face.

    Time # 2 . I parked rather far out at the grocery store as I have a new truck and its rather large for the spaces. When I get out there is a car parked with its drivers door to mine , no big deal. The woman is putting her grocerys in her drivers side{a whole cart load} There was nothing parked on the other side. I had 1 bag in my hand. I asked her if I could sneak into my truck and then I would get it out of her way. Well I get a disgusted look and a in a min response. Well she proceeds to finish unloading her cart . I could have hit her I was so mad!!!!

    What happened to please and thank you and common manners????????????
     
  14. edcopp

    edcopp Well-Known Member

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    Amish folks only do some of that kind of lifestyle now. Perhaps they had the right idea a long time ago but things are changing.

    In the last couple of years the Amish have moved in all around me. They purchased lots of land for all cash, several million dollars worth. They somehow pool their cash as well the labor. This group is not a predominantly farming group, but are carpenters. The men spend as much time as possible "away" working. They build barns, buildings for industry, and even other brands of churches. This is a group of old order Amish, and it looks like cash is king, and independance is secondary.

    I observed one of the Amish men using a cell phone the other day out in a farm field, I asked his brother about this and he said it was permitted because he borrowed the phone from a non-Amish person. Nice people, but I think we need a bit more information. Typical workday for my Amish neighbors is on the road by 6:30 A.M. with their hired driver, and back home about 6:30 P.M. Some chores before and after. Often they will slack off a bit on saturday, perhaps work 8 or 10 hours at home. No work on sunday. Not my kind of schedule.

    The commune type of lifestyle seems to only work until some individual person wants to be "in charge" this might happen on the first day, but for sure by the second day.
     
  15. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Actually, I think the Mennonites live as about as close to this ideal as possible. If your barn burns down on Saturday, they will be there on Monday IF you have the building materials there.
     
  16. amelia

    amelia Well-Known Member

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    Seems like people line up into two camps: the ones pulling the wagon and the ones riding in it. If everybody was as willing to build a barn as have one built, it would be darned near Utopia.
     
  17. to live free

    to live free Well-Known Member

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    i'm not aying that there is no plumbing or phone
    you can keep the truck just park it out side the co community a short walk to your house
    i'm saying we go back in time i'm saying we adopt the views and work ethics and ad a modern touch. the are has one of the best hospitals in the state, as well as a school system second none. the town is a growing old type of town. with a 45,000 people city 40 to 45 min away.
    i think that life is not ment to be working every day at some office where all you do is work to pay bills there is no satisfying end product.
     
  18. to live free

    to live free Well-Known Member

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    There Is A Place To Get Away And Live Dirt Cheap. Maine
     
  19. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I think Amelia hit the nail on the head.
     
  20. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    I guess what I'm saying is that I don't want to build a community with barbed wire around it or rules about whether or not you can have a truck,
    but a place where if you choose to live with buggy or bike instead, you can still access what you need.
    A community with a baker. Where you can get to the baker in your horse buggy or on a foot or bike path without getting run down on the highway. Where you can safely send your kids to get the bread.
    I would like to trade bread for jerky. Or firewood.

    A town that is not designed for maxi-zoom dweebies going 60mph and where the only requirement for being a part is understanding the importance of "buying local" and finding and filling the unmet needs.

    It doesn't SEEM that hard. I think it doesn't work because we are not trained to think this way.

    I read a good book that addressed this, and even posted about it awhile back, called "Better Off - Flipping the Switch on Technology". He talked some about various communities in the US that can accomodate this sort of lifestyle, the different sects of Amish and the non-religious Amish look-a-likes - he called them Minimites.
    It was very enlightening.