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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone here ever tried cloning tomatoes? If so, how did you go about it and what were the results? Sounds like an interesting experiment.
 

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As a matter of fact I do.... I start my tomatoes early indoors(often too early) I've taken clones either by taking the tops of new growth or even the sucker shoots.

I often take sucker shoots in early summer and stick them in the ground, the summer is often long enought that they grow into strong healthy plants.
 

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Cloning is an excellent way to start tomatoes. If you have a plant that produces really great fruit and is resistant to disease in your area you can continue to grow that same tomatoes nearly indefinitely. One of the best things is that as soon as the plant gets a good root system it will usually bloom. I have carried clones thru the winter and then started them immediately to setting fruit in the spring. It really makes a difference in short season areas.
 

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Thanks for the advice. I potted up 4 and put 2 in water. We have had sunscald problems this year and I thought maybe a later crop would be better. We shall see. Thanks again.
 

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Tomatoes are one of the very easiest of all plants to clone in this way. If you want to be sure, go ahead and use a little rooting hormone, but you rarely actually need it. Remember though that any bacterial or viral problems from the plant will be carried forward. As long as it actually was just sunscald you should be fine. I built a greenhouse this year and in the fall will select cuttings from my best plants to carry forward for next year myself.
 
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foxpawz,

Might want to consider layering some of your plants, as this will give you a faster start, as you can root blooming limbs and transplant these and they will continue to develop fruit.
To layer, just injure a limb close to the ground and then bury that injury and it will take root, sever after rooting has taken place and transplant.

If you don't transplant the layered limb, it will still produce healthier growth/fruit, as there are now roots supplying just it.
 
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