clay/cabin question

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by stumpyacres, Jan 14, 2005.

  1. stumpyacres

    stumpyacres Well-Known Member

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    My dh has a connection to get oak slab would - (bark still on) and he nailed it to the side of my shed so that it looks like a log cabin. What should I use to fill in between the logs to really make it look like a real cabin. We have red clay here but I don't know the "recipe". Any ideas?
     
  2. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    try straw and clay mix a little water to make a cement but iff the boards arent thik enough it might fall out you might have to tack a little screening in the spaces for it to hold on to
     

  3. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    Do a search for "Chinking." I'm almost positive that's the name for the stuff you shove in between the logs.
     
  4. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Be sure to add some sand to the mix to make it stronger and more resistant to cracking. There really isn't a recipe since not all clays are the same. Try doing a small batch of clay/sand/chopped straw. Put it on the crack and wait till it dries to see if you need more or less sand.
     
  5. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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  6. antiquestuff

    antiquestuff Well-Known Member

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    It is all trial and error if you use the traditional clay chinking-not all clays are the same like someone already said. However, some straw is usually a good idea and be sure not to make it too wet. When they had large enough joints, which was usually, they would fill the gaps up with sticks of wood tightly and it would be like a lathe that the clay can stick to better.

    You can also use cement or mortar, but the look just isn't the same. Modern chinking materials work well, but are probably not worth the cost for a shed.
     
  7. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The slab wood hasn't been kiln dried, and a tight joint will dry and shrink until there will be a crack about an inch wide there next year. It would be a lost cause to try chincking the cracks while the boards are still shrinking. If there is some kind of sheeting behind the slabs, a coat of white paint in the cracks would make it look good.