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Gefion's Plow
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I belong to a group on facebook that supports farmers, and many of the people on there are. A lot of these people express some serious hatred for hobby farmers and "city slickers" buying up land that is only rightfully theirs. If these newcomers don't understand their lifestyle then they come onto this group and moan about what's going wrong.

As a kid who wants to move out to the rural midwest from suburban Maryland, I am wondering whether I'll experience community distaste for buying anywhere from 100 to 320 acres that they think belong to them, or if I don't wave when people drive by I'll be shunned. Sure, it shouldn't matter, but it does to me.

Anyway, my question is have any of you experienced this from neighbors? Many of the people on the site are around my age (20s to 30s), and are probably just too young and inexperienced to have any respect.

Also, can anybody really say city slicker and mean it? They sound like people who've never actually confronted a city.
 

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What you don't realize is how some of old timers growed up out here in the country. We grew up when the country wasn't very populated and most everyone knew each other. You could walk or ride your horse just about anywhere you wanted. Hunt or fish about anywhere you wanted. Even if it was on someone elses property. Since the owner knew you and your parents he/she didn't care what you done so long as you didn't harm or steal anything.

But now days you don't have that kind of neighbors anymore. Most generally when the new owner of the property comes aboard they start posting everything and acting like everyone around them is a black man they don't want to associate with. If you just drive up to there house to introduce yourself they threaten to call the law on you if you ever come on their property again.

Just seems like new people make very selfish and hateful neigbors anymore.
 

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Original recipe!
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I see that there about 8 of us all posting at once, so I will probably just repeat ...

If you are a serious farmer and you buy up land you will meet with no trouble. If you are respectful of the land and the history of the area.. no trouble.
If you move in and try to change the area, act like you are better, blow past guys on their tractors on the road while blowing your horn, etc... they will hate you.
Drive an old truck. Chew the fat at the feed store by the woodstove, shop the local hardware whenever you can, ask advice from locals who know about soil conditions, planting times and what grows well and you will do just fine!
 

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Some folks move from the city an bring their ways with them or i've heard :nono: Like calling the cops for anything of course here they may get here tomorrow sometime .Then they want to fuss if their neighbor don't mow his yard the way they think he should or as often :Bawling::Bawling: Mowed mine twice last summer :confused: Here if you move in and M Y O B every thing would be fine :dance: Nearest town from my house is ten miles means i need to move one day . We even leave the keys in our cars :shrug: My wife was born in Detroit Mi her big thing was don't park on the grass :Bawling: Think i have convinced her it will grow back an i still may not mow it !!
 

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I see that there about 8 of us all posting at once, so I will probably just repeat ...

If you are a serious farmer and you buy up land you will meet with no trouble. If you are respectful of the land and the history of the area.. no trouble.
If you move in and try to change the area, act like you are better, blow past guys on their tractors on the road while blowing your horn, etc... they will hate you.
Drive an old truck. Chew the fat at the feed store by the woodstove, shop the local hardware whenever you can, ask advice from locals who know about soil conditions, planting times and what grows well and you will do just fine!
Bingo!
 

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agmantoo
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Nah, you may be tolerated but you will never be fully accepted. I repair the neighbors equipment and never charge for labor. I put cattle up for them if they are out. I start the cars and fix flats if hubby is away for the wives. I am considered good enough to do any thing for any of them but never good enough to be accepted as an equal. They begrudge me owning land in the community and openly tell me so. They never visit unless they want me to do something such as ordering parts off the computer (order now, pay 3 months later when they need something else) or to ask how to get something apart or put it together on their machinery. When they cannot repair something I am a good ole guy to get but once it is repaired their arrogance is such that they question how I did it or what I did and I revert to the second class neighbor. I let one of the neighbors have 10 acres of hay on shares, I was to get a third. I did, but my third did not come off my weed free field. Mine came off a trash weed infested field with kudzu vines in the bales. This is typical. Even when one of the neighbors sons stole from the church as treasurer, it was as if the neighbors accepted this blindly and I remain the heathen. Most of the community is related some way or another. It all boils down to whether you are blood related or not. Blood ties are all that is important here. It doesn't matter if it is incest, it just has to be blood relations. I have come to get a warped sense of enjoyment from their behavior and no longer give a carp.
 

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agmantoo, how long have you been there? I always say it takes country folks a LOT longer to accept someone.

Farmers watch everything you do very carefully, but eventually it is as if you have always been there. If not for youself, then likely for your kids. In the meantime, just do the best you can.

The MYOB and dont be a cop-caller are both good ways to fit in, IMO.
 

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agmantoo i was born here i learned which ones would do favor for favor an which ones you charge like rip . Man ask me how i could give slabs to some people told him my buddies were free the ones don't have time for me or fuss about price pays double :clap: If you do everything for nothing when you die they will say you were a good ol boy .If you charge em like zip they will say he was sure a good mechanic gunna sure miss him :shrug:
 

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I heard two locals talking about the new folks that had moved in down the road. "Just like the rest of these city slickers they come down here, bought 5 acres, put a double wide on it, bought too many horses and one barking dog and put up no tresspassing signs, who the h wants to go see'em anyway."
 

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Gefion's Plow
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Here small farms are pretty typical for new people buying land, considering an acre will probably run a hundred thousand at least. You can't really blame a person if any more isn't affordable, especially if the criticizer inherited his/her land.
 

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agmantoo
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gone-a-milkin
I have been in this community for 19 years. However, this is the same county I was born in.
 

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Cactus Farmer/Cat Rancher
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My parents had someone from the big city buy land to the south of them. The guy got in a tizzy because according to the survey my parent's fence was 5 foot on his land. He sued both them the other neighbor. Guy didn't want to work with anyone, my dad even offered to buy the small strip of land. Keep in mind, this guy bought over 100 acres so it wasn't like there was a lack of space. This is the sort of thing that grinds rural people's gears. People born and raised here have a live and let live attitude. People who come from the city and whine about other people's run down houses or piles of junk are quickly despised. Also unfortunately for people born and raised here the housing prices and land prices have skyrocketed due to everyone and their brother from the big city wanting a little piece of the NorthWoods.

Also, keep in mind, sometimes no matter how hard one tries they may never be accepted into a community. It isn't right, and I don't care where someone comes from, but it happens. Some areas are better than others. I have been to small towns where they love everybody, and I have been to others where you are stared down when you walk into a grocery store.
 

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I think it has to do with how you act toward people . I was a tranplant here in Ky 30 years ago I now know more people than my wife who has lived here all her life . Had a neighbor move in in front of us last year and the first thing she said to me was I needed to move the gate at the end of our drive I tryed to explain to her that is was private but she said she knew it was a county road . Had to go get the deed and show her where the road was deeded to our farm years ago . Now summer comes and they have hay in the field on the ground and his bailer breaks They are calling for rain so on a Sunday afternoon I take my tractor and bailer bail the hay for them . He didn't ask .
We get along much better now . Be nice until it time to be not so nice .
 

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Animal Addict
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I dislike "city slickers" but for a whole different reason. I live out here in my little slice of heaven (I sent you a PM!) and...

Development companies have come in, torn all the farmland up, people moving out here by the droves turning THIS into the city, and like someone mentioned, bringing their "ways" with them. There is litter everywhere on the sides of the road, roadkill everywhere because these idiots will not slow down on our twisty roads surrounded by woods, they have built a golf course and have multi-million dollar town houses and condos. They have built professional buildings (how many flipping doctors do you need in one square mile), voted for building and expanding, then voted down a gas station because it would mar the landscape. So if I need a doc, I can drive 10 minutes down the road, but a tank of gas is a 20 minute trip. They move out here with those fake hummers and yuppie clothes and have the nerve to look at ME when I walk in the grocery store in muck boots or hay falls out of my truck when I open the hatch. Thank GOD when my husband's grandmother decided to sell the farm, she sold it to a friend of mine because a logging company AND a developer were looking at the property (we live on parcels of land bought from the original farm, and are surrounded by the farm). We back up to a state park, so that is a blessing. Those "city folk" couldn't wait to move out to the country...only to screw it up as badly as the city.

And THAT is why I don't like "city slickers." I could care less if they talk to me in the store, but I need a Bumper Sticker that says "keep that stupid ugly McDonald's wrapper in your car, you Escalade non-driving yuppie doofus!!!" or "Deer do not count as extra points on your way to work."

But Cam, you do not seem to fit that category, so you're ok! (if you actually drive an Escalade I apologize, lol). Come over and we'll go to that fancy schmancy Italian Restaurant they put in the strip mall....

OK, stepping off the soapbox...darn, tripped over a golf ball....
 

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Gefion's Plow
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks, everybody, for the comments. I'll keep all them in mind. OldCountryBoy, you're right that new people tend to do put up signs and call police. Our society is getting more recluse, and that's why the average house size is expanding and nobody goes outside anymore, but there's really nothing our country can do about it. I like to think I'm less of a jerk than many suburban dwellers--have a respect for land, hardly ever honk at anything, and I tolerate a lot of stuff without complaining.
I guess it also depends on which state you're in how people treat you. When I visited ND and SD a couple years ago the people were respectful and surprised that anybody on the east coast would be interested in (at the time) going to college there.

I guess if I was just tolerated it'd be about like living here, so it's all the same.
 

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Move in, plant your garden, get your chickens, keep your head down, and do your own thing -- and you'll be accepted with no trouble. It'll take a while for the other folks to come around, but they will.

Move in, demand street lights, complain about the neighbors target shooting on the weekend, complain about tractors on the road, and prove to everyone that you're a mooch and a whiner the first time it snows -- and people will be polite to your face but will never accept you as part of the community.

Expect to be the topic of conversation for the first couple years - that's just normal. Pretty soon, you'll find yourself joining in those conversations about the new folks down the road...

Find out where the men have coffee in the mornings. There's always a particular diner or coffee shop where the men will get together. That's where you'll start to get to know your neighbors.
 

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Be powerful. No other option exists.
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Yes, you do need to wave at every car.

You need to keep the "we used to do it this way in....." comments out of your conversation.

Join local organizations, but don't try to change anything for five years. At least. Decline their offers of making you an officer of the organization.

Don't tell anyone how much you paid for the land/house. Come up with some clever and polite way to avoid answering that question.

Don't make friends too fast. Frequently, the friendliest folks are the ones that nobody else will talk to. Keep your mouth closed and your eyes open. Figure out who is trustworthy before becoming buddies. This may take a year or so.
 

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Move here!!! we need more outsiders like me.

The locals that were born here and are related to everyone are friendly, but they only wave and say hi, they don't invite us "outsiders" to their homes or include us in their lives in any way. We are obviously going to be outsiders until the day we die. They are friendly enough when we run into them, but we'll never be good enough to become locals in their minds.

We outsiders are forming our own friendships where we actually invite people to our homes. We invite the locals, but they never come, they are always to busy with their friends and families.

I've been here 15 years and I'm still an outsider (even after being secretary of a local organization for a few years!). A friend of mine has been here 50 years and he's still an outsider. Our kids that went to school here and grew up with the local kids are now locals, but those of us who didn't grow up with our peers will never be "insiders".
 

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I'm fine with cities - if it weren't for them there wouldn't be so much nice empty spaces between them. Suburbs is another story - just a waste of good farmland ;)
 

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we've lived here for over 13 years and feel we're just now getting out of the 'new ppl' role. most are related, and it took forever to be accepted. they were always nice, but it was that top-surface type nice. it just takes time
 
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