city people in the country

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ratherbefishin, Nov 6, 2004.

  1. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    so.. I'm ticked off, I was burning some garden refuse 2 days before the ''burning ban'' came of- and someone called the firedepartment.I waited untill we had a wek of rain, there was absolutely zero firehazard, I had a charged hose right there, plus filled water buckets .Anyway the firetruck came , and I had to put the fire out-even though another 10 minutes would have burned it out.The chief gave me a warning, and said I had to wait untill the outside fire ban was off.I said I figured after a week of heavy rain there was no hazard-and he agreed , but said we had too many city people who had moved out into the country now and demanded a bunch of rules-using one;s common sense wasn't good ennough.
    They shut down all bow hunting[ and we now have a plague of deer] you have to get a ''building permit'' for even a garden shed- and don't even bother trying to get a permit for a chicken house- let alone shoot the coons who bother the chickens.Trapping is grounds for a protest march and bumper stickers, [I think even rattraps are frowned on]
    Heaven help you if you cut a tree down[you have to get a ''permit'' to cut any trees- and only after a ''professional'' certifys the tree as dead] no leaves and peeling bark obviously doesn't make it dead.
    You certainly can't have a pig, and saying you want to keep a cow for milk would probably result in a social worker come knocking atthe door demanding whaty you are exposing your kids to ther ''risk'' of drinking raw milk[ so far they haven;t required moms to pasturize their own breastmilk- but that will no doubt be next.
    The crack of a 22 would bring a swat team out full force[ I use cb longs- they are quiet] and if you humanely dispatched a deer hit by a car, you would be taken away in handcuffs[ you have to call the pound and they load the injured deer into a van and bounce the poor traumatised creature all over the roads until they can ''humanely'' euthanise it- maybe an hour later.]
    Why don't these dear souls just go back to town and live their sanitized lives in a highrise condo?
     
  2. joan from zone six

    joan from zone six Well-Known Member

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    how about a "heads-up" - tell folks WHERE not to go -
     

  3. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    We have a grass burning season by permit during the late spring and summer months. Keeping people bound to knowing why certain times it's 'banned' to burn is for prevention of wild fires that destroy other property or forest. I can understand the reasoning behind this, and would hope me or my neighbor have common sense about ground conditions and when it's safe to burn.
    West of here in the wheat growing prairies, like Manitoba, they do fall stubble burning which consumes the skies with smoke. Where this is done near the bigger cities, like Winnipeg, people complain because of asthma attacks and such. Farmers still do it as a consecquence of purposeful agriculatural managament.
    'City Slicker's need education about 'WHY' these practices are being done and if they have net benefit, everyone needs to understand that.
    I burn grass and shrub for reasons of safety and it helps to regenerated new growth, helps knock down some insect and rodent populations (ticks, grasshoppers) near the residence. Timing is also a factor about WHEN we are allowed to burn, and again it's common sense to burn near sunset time when it's safer and probalby less hassle for anyone that might notice it less than if the 'city folk' living in the country might take daytime notice more. Also, wind direction is a factor if the smoke blows directly towards a neighbor that might initiate complaints.

    Probably a good idea is to have a rural municipal conference for sessions about grass burnign. This is done here in conjunction with the Natural Resources department. When residents of the rural municipality get proper information on the right way of doing the burning, and when it's best to do so, and mostly WHY it's a good idea, then maybe they come around to understand eventurally.
    The 'rules' of rural vs. city living should be somewhat more intellegintly articulated and engaged with, because there is a difference that city slickers know many things about 'street life' differ greatly with mother nature in the country. The view about what is 'humane' or sensible is terribly distorted with someone whom has never spent much time away from concrete building, traffic lights, and armchair 'solutions'. I'm thinking here also about things like deer or other wildlife overpopulations when they deplete their natural food source or all their natural predators are eliminated. The 'good' souls by city slicker standards to unnaturally intervene probably causes more harm than good, and it's ugly to see what is 'humane' about starving creatures in nature which they think can be solved by unnatural means with disastrous consequences. How can transporting a deer for 'humane euthansia' be judeged MORE humane than disposing of it humanely when it's suffering on site. How you get that understaning across is an ongoing challenge.

    Another example is like when a city dweller who has a racoon problem wanting to nest in their chimney. They call a city 'pest control' operator that traps the animal, and the city home dweller has no concept that the animal needs to be disposed of, and get up in arms about overpopulation of racoons in their city area because of their 'invitation' with providing the perfect environment. It's easier to call on the 'system' to take care of a problem, and that feels 'okay' to them, even though the animal that they called to be kiled by another's hands. In other words, they wash their hands of the problem and will continue to judge others 'out there' harshly and not address why the problem of racoon city overpopulation exists to begin with and is 'their problem'.
    So much about common sense seems to have 'left the building'.
     
  4. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    it is prohibited to have a fire bigger than a 3' circumferance,and it must not be allowed to burn after dark.I don't care if it's legal to burn or not- if the weather is still too dry- I won't burn-legal or not.
    You can't bring in a load of manure for your garden- it smells- you're supposed to buy a bag of sterilized steer manure if you want to use manure.
    They shut off bow hunting because it was ''cruel'' so now cars kill them by the score- more often as not to drag themselves off the road and die-the city folk just complain bitterly about the damage to their car.
    And, of yeah, these folks bring along their pedigreed dogs- and let them run deer''for the excercise''.Afew years back one fisherman heading out, saw a couple of dogs running sheep- so he shot them both and radio'd the RCMP what he had seen and done.The dog owners, outraged , demanded the cop charge the fisherman, and were apopoliptic when the cop said,'' no, I'm here to charge YOU with allowing your dogs to harrass livestock- and the fisherman was perfectly within his rights to shoot your dogs''
    Yah, and while I've got a head of steam, these same people come out from thr city and dump their unwanted cats and dogs- leaving me to dispose of them.The feral cats have decimated the pheasants, once common around here.
    I'm just getting a little fed up with seeing small acreages devoped into townhouses and 50' lots-sprouting signs like''heritage woods'' and '' forest lawn''
     
  5. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Common sense is NOT very common, especially among 'city' folks that have moved to the country.
     
  6. havellostmywings

    havellostmywings Well-Known Member

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    I guess I should feel good about the fact I live in an area where we can burn whenever we need to. In fact today, we are going to burn a couch... along with the regular trash.

    We dont have trash pick up here... we have been careful about burning the past month or so... since the "hunters" are up every weekend... but I guess I shouldnt complain to much... their aluminum cans are paying for my gasoline...

    i can remember my grandparents homes... they lived in the San Fernando Valley in California... in the actual town of San Fernando... and both of their houses had incinerators... back when they had to burn their trash... the incinerator at the second house had not seen a fire in years... but I used it all the time to sit on to talk to the neighbor boy... (rolling eyes)...

    now, we recycle what is recyclable.. and burn the rest.. oh and the organics go in the mulch pile... shrug... again common sense...

    which the city folks dont have... my own mother.. couldnt cook over an open fire to save her life... and my sister couldnt cook it if it didnt come out of apackage or a box...

    ok.. getting off my soap box and adding it to todays fire

    Lynn in Texas
     
  7. Ovibos

    Ovibos Member

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    Most people, city or not, lack common sense. Many communities that have not had great migrations of former city dwellers still have an abundance of regulations. Not being allowed to burn, open fires during a dry or windy period is not only common, it is common sense. I like to think there are smart people regardless of location, for just as silly city people would put a wool coat on a sheep, idot country types would try and mount it.( no, not on the wall ) The common problem is overpopulation of undereducated peoples. Stupid people equals stupid rules. Another question is to where you live?? Is it a suburban neighborhood?? Houses on quarter acre lots?? In those circumstances of great density, open fires are not only unsafe but impolite.
     
  8. Cedar

    Cedar Well-Known Member

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    Those on farms don’t have to worry but those near here who live on half acre/ acre lots just throw their leaves in the middle of the paved road and lights’m up. Prevents the big burned black spot in the yard. People just drive in the their yards to go around them…not that much traffic so doesn’t matter. Nothing brings neighbors together like a good leaf fire :rolleyes:
     
  9. coachlisacmt

    coachlisacmt Member

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    At least you don't live in California. I live in the uppermost part of California. My grandparents came to this area in the 1900's. My father and brothers hunted the woods for years, only hunting for our family needs. My brother got his first deer with a bow and arrow at the age of 15.
    However, it is quickly changing. I live in a town of 800 people. The largest town closest to me is 40 miles away. In the last 7 years it has gone from 65,000 to 85,000. The roads are congested, house costs are outrageous. Young people who grew up in Redding can't even afford a home. We have Real Estate Refugees moving up from the south. They sell their big houses and move up to Redding and buy a house for about half of what they sold their homes for in the city. However, they have brought along all of the things they feel are necessary for their livelyhood (Malls, chain stores, Hummers, Porsches, selfishness, lack of community, arrogance, crowded roads, pushy drivers). Redding recently built a 2.3 million dollar bridge that looks like a crane because the city people who moved to Redding felt it needed more culture. I have seventy acres around me and there is a reason why............ : :worship:
     
  10. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    I;ll tell you what happens around here- we get these subdivisions coming in[ paving over farmland]and then they demand all sorts of ''improvements'' raising the taxes- which in turn forces more farmers to sell, because they now can't afford to pay the taxes.Then the people in the subdivisions[ who just love looking out over nicely tended fields] start complaining about ''smells'' from the manure the farmer spreads on his fields to make those lovely ''farm scenes''They don't like noise either- roosters wake them up too early, and they pass bylaws about how early machinery can be run-or how late.They don't like slash burning, either.
    And they decide that the farmer shouldn't be able to take a deer or pheasant off his own land- or shoot a duck that lands in his irregation pond, or the geese that land in his fields after the crops are off[ all guns are dangerous-don't you know?].They don't want him trappingthe muskrats in the creek either[leghold traps!!!]or the beaver that plug the culverts and flood the fields.
    I moved to the country -because I love it.My father grew up on a farm. I fish in the lake, raise a few chickens [ got to shoot the odd coon out of the cedar tree at night with the aid of a lantern,]heat the house with wood, I like the smell of burning leaves and I enjoy splitting firewood.I have a small garden and enjoy some fresh vegetables. I have some apple trees, and the deer fare pretty well off my place, but I sort of even things up by putting a fat forkhorn in the freezer come fall.
    And- I mind my own darn business....
     
  11. I'm glad I live where I do, but I can see it coming in the future. Maybe not in my life but my children will probably live it before their time is up.