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In Remembrance
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http://ny.essortment.com/growingcilantro_rctx.htm

"Cilantro is an annual, that grows best in cool weather. Too much heat will make it flower and go to seed early, and frost will kill the plants. While growing best in full sun, if you live in an area with long hot summers, it is best to plant your seeds in the fall for spring time harvest. If living where the weather is cooler, you will want to trim your seedlings to ground level after they reach 3 inches in height. You can continue planting every several weeks until the weather warms."

Hope this helps.
 

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I always plant cilantro early, keep it going and dry some till it bolts and then at the end of the hot season plant it again till it frosts. The fresh dried stuff got me through the hot season. This year I bought some "Vietnamese Cilantro" which tastes a little different and is a bit milder, but grows like mad when it is hot. I have been using it in salsa and it's good :) I still prefer regular Cilantro, but this'll help through the hot middle of summer.
 

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Windy Island Acres
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I do plantings every few weeks along with my lettuce. Save the seeds (coriander) as it bolts, and have a new stand growing. Both my lettuce and cilantro (and dill) are somewhat shaded by corn to provide some heat relief.
 

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steff bugielski said:
How did you dry it. I thought it did not dry well.
steff
It doesn't LoL, that's why I was glad to get the Vietnamese kind :)

I basically live in a desert climate and everything dries here. I just bundled it and hung it upside down in the pantry. When it dries (like some other herbs) I put it in Ziploc bags cuz it isn't very stable. I only use it short term- through the hot weeks. It crumbles and loses its flavor somewhat, but it still worked.

I really like the Vietnamese Cilantro solution now though.
 

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I've forever run into the problem of having fresh cilantro. It's one of many welcome volunteers each spring. Of course, it's dry coriander by the time tomatoes and peppers are ripe and salsa is on the canning schedule. A way to always have fresh cilantro is to pick the leaves while still at their prime and freeze them. Each year, I fill a gallon jar loosely with the whole leaves and freeze it. Then right out of the jar and into the blender to be chopped with everything else. Taste is the same as if it were fresh!

Martin
 

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Paquebot said:
I've forever run into the problem of having fresh cilantro. It's one of many welcome volunteers each spring. Of course, it's dry coriander by the time tomatoes and peppers are ripe and salsa is on the canning schedule. A way to always have fresh cilantro is to pick the leaves while still at their prime and freeze them. Each year, I fill a gallon jar loosely with the whole leaves and freeze it. Then right out of the jar and into the blender to be chopped with everything else. Taste is the same as if it were fresh!

Martin
I'm going to try that too!

Thanks!
 
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