Choosing a chainsaw

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Don Armstrong, Apr 25, 2005.

  1. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    Whatever you do, you probably won't be doing so much work that you need to economise on lubricants. Use the recommended oils - fuel and lubrication - in the recommended manner.
     
  2. HoosierDeb

    HoosierDeb Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Don, I imagine that can make a difference in performance and life of the tool. I'll keep that in mind.
     

  3. Ozarks_1

    Ozarks_1 Well-Known Member

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    Depending on where you're going to be using it, you might want to consider an ELECTRIC chainsaw.

    I use one for small jobs close to the house.
    A friend saw me using it and was impressed enough to buy one. He's had a couple strokes and has no problem using it. In fact, he even takes it out in the woods ... loads his little generator, saw, and extension cord in the trailer behind his tractor and off he goes.
    (He's had a couple small "mishaps" with a regular gas chainsaw and his wife doesn't worry about him as much when he uses the electric one.)
     
  4. Ohiosteve

    Ohiosteve Well-Known Member

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    You've gotten good advice so far. I have Stihl and Husqvarna and much prefer the Stihl. My only added advice is to avoid the small arborist models. They are very short and the handles are designed so that your hands are too close which gives you little leverage. I have a 021 with a 16" bar that is light and powerfull.
     
  5. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I too was going to recommend Stihl - just bought my big one, have had a 14" model for years (009 or some such model???), got a 20" bar 310 a month ago.

    If I were you I'd look for about a 14" model - nice weight to size ratio & very useful size - smaller gets to be too childish and really the same price as you can only down-size so much, bigger gets to be heavier, more effort to start, etc. And generally Stihl dealers are knowledgeble in helping you get the engine & bar size you need.

    While you _can_ cut through wood 2x as big as the bar is long, that gets real old about the second time you try it. :) You want a bar big enough to cut through 90% of the wood you will be cutting with one pass.

    I came across a pile of 18-24" dead wood this spring, and so I got the 20" bar Stihl. I spend all afternoon with my 14" saw and made a very small pile of wood - not enough bar, not enough power. The first day with the bigger 20" machine I was far less tired and had 3-4 times as much wood cut......

    Johnsenred & Husky are also good brands I hear of, if you have a dealer nearby. Some of these are now selling 'consumer models' in the box stores. They are ok, but are stripped down, weaker, & just not the support there that one might need? Anyhow you need to know there is a difference between the stuff in a box on the shelf with a high school kid selling it, and a dealer with a repair shop & some knowledge... I would much rather spend $25-50 more and talk it over with a dedicated dealer for a good model.....

    --->Paul
     
  6. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Never buy a new chain saw from a store that doesn't service what they sell on site. If they don't have a shop to assemble, service, and repair the tool, go elsewhere.

    Jim
     
  7. HoosierDeb

    HoosierDeb Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, guys.. looks like it will be a Stihl. I've found a couple of dealers in town and will be checking with them this week. I doubt very much that I'll be cutting anything big enough to worry about getting twice the size of my bar anyway. I was thinking along the 14" bar models with the easy start feature. I've had trouble with starting stuff with pull ropes in the past so that feature really appeals to me. I agree with the business about having a knowledgeable person sell the stuff and them being able to service it too. I certainly have no skills in small engine repair... yet. May be in my future though, you never know.
     
  8. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    I'd also recommend a Stihl with one possible exception. Steer clear of the 290 model which is also called the Farm Boss. I've heard reports of design problems. I've got one and it's never run right. A friend had the same model and had the engine seize. Apparently they're OK for occasional use but not for day after day work.

    Lots of folks use them on weekends and other light duty and don't run into the same problems. When my friend took his saw into the shop and asked about buying another 290, his buddy there strongly suggested he buy something other than a 290. The older models whose model number starts with a 0; such as an 029, 044, 066, are all solid machines.
     
  9. ibcnya

    ibcnya Well-Known Member

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    That's your opinion Darren, no problem. I've had a farm boss for a couple of years and have had no problems and I cut wood for heat strictly. I believe it's keeping the machine tuned more than anything. Stihl all the way unless you want to go to one of the high end Japanese models.