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Does anyone have any experience with a supaflue liner or any other type of poured chimney liner? If so what did you pay and how tall was your chimney? I'm weighing the options of a stainless liner and a poured in liner. I understand the poured liner helps the structural integrity of the chimney and the supaflue comes with a lifetime warranty according to the chimney sweep. However I don't know exactly what is covered in that warranty. All ideas and suggestions are welcome. Thanks everyone.
 

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Lovin' the Country Life
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I can't help with your question, but following, since we have the same situation at our house.
 

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Rocky Mountain Deserts
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I don't have any experience with poured liners, but, I have removed and replaced several flexible chimney liners that were only a few years old. After what I have seen with the flexible liners, I would never put one in for myself unless there was no other choice. Like many things in construction, you get what you pay for.
Only further advice I have is that if you have to hire someone to do the job, ask them about their experience - ask them to see pictures of their work on previous jobs, choose a contractor that has been doing this kind of work for several years, choose a contractor that is licensed, bonded, and insured, and shop local whenever possible (traveling for work cost money that gets charged to the homeowner one way or another). Some things you can get by with going cheap, or inexperienced to save some money. When it comes to burning down your home if things are not done right - not worth the savings. You could ask your local fireplace dealer or HVAC contractor for references and recommendations to help you find the right guy to do the job at a fair price and avoid the hacks.
 

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Would you mind going a little more in depth about the flexible liner problems........thinking about installing one myself.
 

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Rocky Mountain Deserts
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Plowhand. a lot of times with a flexible liner, often we see rusted spots (if made of steel - aluminum and stainless are better for not rusting), but the most troubling part is that every little wind causes the liner to flex and move, quickly wearing holes in it against the chimney it is set into. Even a decent amount of draw in a chimney can cause this. It is a lot like dryer vent hose in how it flexes when moving hot air inside of it in a cold environment. They can also come loose from their mounting points and fall down the chimney fairly easily. They are easy enough to install, but fairly difficult to secure.
 

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I was planning on using a stainless liner......... Then old chimneys in this 100+ year old house are strait, don't really need a flexible liner....but need a liner. I don't under stand the flexing against the chimney though....If it's secured at the top of the chimney, and secured in the thimble inside the chimney, besides the insulation and the mesh metal "sock" over it all......I don't really understand the abrasion problem.....but I have no experiance with anything other than old chimneys, and a insulated through the roof chimney , which I don't like to much.
 

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Lovin' the Country Life
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Here, the stainless liner goes in and then is surrounded by at least one inch of poured in material to provide insulating qualities. It's required by code. I can't imagine adding just the six inch liner that I have seen.
 

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Hi,

I am totally new here. We just moved into an old house (c. 1770), and we want to put in a wood stove. There is a fireplace that was previously set up for a coal stove, and the top of the fireplace is sealed with a sheet metal plate with a tube extending a few inches out the bottom (6" diameter I think).

I know there is some sort of metal chimney liner installed all the way to the top of the chimney, but I do not know if it is insulated. Since the tube is going up the masonry chimney, will it be safe to use with a wood stove? Or do we need an insulated metal chimney even for venting up a chimney.

Hope I explained that ok

Rob
 
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Rob , I would say what you have needs to be inspected by a qualified person to answer your question .
 
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