Chimney for wood burning stove

Discussion in 'Alternative Energy' started by Big Dave, Oct 7, 2006.

  1. Big Dave

    Big Dave Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,615
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2006
    Location:
    West Central Arkansas
    I bought a wood burning stove today. Now I have never installed such so I need all the advise I can muster.It is a six inch stove pipe that comes out of the top and the stove itself is made from 1/4 inch steel plate. I want to go up about a foot from the top of the vaulted ceiling. Then out thru the wall and up past the top of the house.
    Now here is what I do not know: What goes thru the wall? Double or triple insulated pipe? Is it colred black or shiny tin? Do I need to Paint the outside of it? After it comes out of the wallwhat does it go into? I wen to lowe's and Home depot and neither had the chmney just the inside stove pipe. Any help I would be much obliged.
     
  2. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,360
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    MN
    You need non-galvanized stove pipe inside (crimps facing downward so tar drainings stay inside), then a thimble that allows a pretty big set-back from your wall/ceiling, and triple-insulated stainless is the only realistic metal way to go outside the house. That (thimble & 3x insulated stainless) is very expensive, but there is no way to cut corners & have a good outcome.

    You need to go high enough to allow the smoke to draw, so winds don't come over your peak & push the smoke back down into your house.

    In general, the bend going out the wall is a _real_ bad idea, will be hard to clean, will slow the draft, and other issues of support & height & so. Best bet by far is to go straight up through the roof. By far better to go straight up. The hole is only slightly harder to seal, but everything else will be harder & more $ to go with the elbow through the wall.

    Typically.

    Someone on here did a real neat job of this, & posted with pics about it. Way cool, maybe you can find that thread, or that person will reply to you here.

    --->Paul
     

  3. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    13,086
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    Ontario
    There are insulated "T"s packages that go through the wall too but Rambler said what I was thinking.
     
  4. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,484
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2005
    Location:
    Florida
    I agree with rambler, also. Go straight out the roof. You'll be glad you did.
     
  5. vicker

    vicker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,561
    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2003
    Location:
    Central S. C.
    I believe you need a two foot clearance below your ceiing. There are times when the un-insulated pipe will exceed 500 Degrees F..
    I went out the wall and up. I just didn't want to cut a hole in my new tin roof :shrug:
    it would have been way cheper to go straight up though. I remember that one peice, the out side T thas has a port for cleaning, was over $200. My chimney cost nearly $1000 total, but no way was I going to skimp on that.
    Get the very best.
     
  6. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

    Messages:
    2,981
    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2002
    Location:
    NE PA
    I have the triple insulated and shiny piping outside. It also goes through the wall creating tow 90 degree turns. I end up having to clean my chimney every three weeks because of the turns plus the part on the outside cools so fast that the creosote forms. And I use two year old dried wood, so that is not the problem. Wish I had gone straight up, but it wasn't convenient at the time, but if I had to do it over, it would go straight!
    Ann
     
  7. Boss Cooker

    Boss Cooker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    184
    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    Location:
    South West Florida
    This might help. go to www.copperfield.com They are a chimney supply and will sell to home owners. The folks there can answer any questions and you can save some money by getting your materials from them. The local hardware store will be very expensive. :hobbyhors
     
  8. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,360
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    MN

    Hummm, web site seems _very_ unfriendly to do-it-yourselfers & buying anything other than through their network of installers?????? Reading their web site, I'd not waste time calling them - are they different than they advertise?

    --->Paul
     
  9. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

    Messages:
    15,600
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Between Crosslake and Emily Minnesota
    I believe it is Alex who has photos of his stovepipe and chimney installation project.

    I agree with the others, the less elbows the better....go thru the ceiling and roof if possible. Inside the house, remember that the single-wall stovepipe (black pipe) should be 18" from any combustibles. You can use double-wall stovepipe inside the house, too. Double-wall requires a 9" setback from combustibles.
     
  10. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

    Messages:
    2,981
    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2002
    Location:
    NE PA
    If you MUST have bends in the chimney, try putting a clean out at the bottom where it goes outside. As previously posted, I need to clean mine every three weeks due to excessive creosote build-up, but since the bottom of the outside run is within arms reach, I can clean it while standing on the ground, so that I do not need to go up on the roof when it is snowy or icy. Makes it a lot safer for cleaning, and it gets done regularly, whereas if I had to go on the roof, I might procrastinate and have a fire. I then take the pipe out of the stove and where it passes through the wall and clean those parts so that the complete chimney is clean.
    Ann
     
  11. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,180
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2004
    Location:
    WI
    Triple wall pipe isn't generally recommended for wood stoves, although some prefab fireplace manufacturers recommend it. Some of the triple wall pipe insulates the inner smoke pipe with multiple airspaces (hence "triple wall") and these actually cool the smoke pipe too much, leading to creosote build up if you are using an airtight stove with it. You want to use a pipe with actual insulation designed to help keep the pipe hot, keeping a good draft, and lessening the chance of creosote build up. Burning good dry wood is also important.
     
  12. Boss Cooker

    Boss Cooker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    184
    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    Location:
    South West Florida
    I have done business with them for several years. They caution a home owner about doing a install because a chimney pro may have better training. That said, I told a client about them and he bought the materials from them. They were helpful and polite. He had no problems doing his own work. A home owner without building skils would have a hard time doing a chimney install. A home owner that can read a level and understand the math can do a fine job on a new install.
    All of the products they sell come with instructions. A phone call to Copperfield would answer your questions.
    Check the chimney links below. I like doing business with Copperfield. But there are other chimney supply houses out there.
     
  13. Jackpine Savage

    Jackpine Savage Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    191
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2002
    Location:
    Central MN
    I recently installed an 8" Supervent chimney. It was available locally at Menards ( a Home Depot type store in the Midwest). Here's the website with the online planner and installation guide, that will give you an idea of the components and installation options.

    http://www.selkirkcanada.com/products/supervent/index.shtml

    The other chimney I look at was Duravent. They have a dealer locator on their site: http://www.duravent.com/

    For my installation I went from the basement ceiling straight up through the house. I had to do some reframing through the 1st floor ceiling and roof because the framing didn't line up to give enough clearance for the 8" pipe. It was a couple day project.

    It's 27 degrees right now, that wood heat sure feels good.
     
  14. eulabes

    eulabes full time daydreamer

    Messages:
    71
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2006
    Location:
    Iowa
    I second that. I just had installed a little woodburning stove from Menards and we're pretty comfy in our very warm home!

    I also added a couple blankets to our already covered up windows and put the darkest material towards the outside - it was easier than plastic for me and i think it's working!

    eulabes