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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was a sign installer (we called ourselves hangers) for awhile. I don't like heights, but you learn to deal with it when your job requires you to be wayyyyy off of mother earth. We installed all manner if signage from mobile message boards to billboards and everything in between.


I often worked off of one of these.

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Accompanied by one of these to lift signs and pieces of signs up to the work area..

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I have worked out of a bucket at the end of the boom of the crane to reach extremely high billboard faces to paint them out.

That'll make your toes tingle.
 

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Last time I rode one of those things up I had to climb out and get on a crane to service it. I walked back down the stairs when I finished. End of shift, met supervisor at the bottom. He said, "I'll see you tomorrow." My reply was, "Not unless you are going to be in Austin, because I'm not coming back here!"
 

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I was a sign installer (we called ourselves hangers) for awhile. I don't like heights, but you learn to deal with it when your job requires you to be wayyyyy off of mother earth. We installed all manner if signage from mobile message boards to billboards and everything in between.


I often worked off of one of these.

View attachment 97591

Accompanied by one of these to lift signs and pieces of signs up to the work area..

View attachment 97592


I have worked out of a bucket at the end of the boom of the crane to reach extremely high billboard faces to paint them out.

That'll make your toes tingle.
To borrow a phrase from my sister-in-law, "Y'all are crazy!" There's not enough money in the world to get me to do that job.
 

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When I worked on Radio Towers we were called Riggers. I don't think I would want to work on signs, I wouldn't like being that close to the ground all day. There are two, one thousand foot towers in Odessa, Texas, and a two thousand footer in Houston. I used to climb them and change the light bulbs. Spent a lot of time painting five hundred footers for El Paso Natural Gas. Nah, the guys that work on those signs are just crazy.
 

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@muleskinner2

Not for all the tea in China. I built elevators for several years before I decided to turn my attention to servicing verses installs. At least I could get a running car at some point and spend a week a floor building it. Then go to the next one. But that shaft provided a sense of security even while the two on you dangled on a 3/8" cable hundreds of feet up to hang and align the rails and beams for the elevator.
 

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I learned to rappel with a half inch nylon rope, on a four hundred foot self supported tower. We spent two months painting and installing new antennas on the tower, and on off shore rigs, for Gulf Oil at a camp in Cabinda, Angola. First you climbed to the top and hung the rope, then pulled up five gallon buckets of paint, and painted from the top down, sitting in a home made bosin's chair, moving down the rope a few feet, when you had painted everything you could reach. There was a ladder that ran up one leg, with a cage around it. But climbing down for lunch was too slow, so we got on the outside of the cage and slid down the slats. My best time coming down four hundred feet, was fifty five seconds. We had to stop coming down that way, because it burned through the insides of our boots. Ahh, to be young again.
 

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Shazbot!
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I learned to rappel with a half inch nylon rope, on a four hundred foot self supported tower. We spent two months painting and installing new antennas on the tower, and on off shore rigs, for Gulf Oil at a camp in Cabinda, Angola. First you climbed to the top and hung the rope, then pulled up five gallon buckets of paint, and painted from the top down, sitting in a home made bosin's chair, moving down the rope a few feet, when you had painted everything you could reach. There was a ladder that ran up one leg, with a cage around it. But climbing down for lunch was too slow, so we got on the outside of the cage and slid down the slats. My best time coming down four hundred feet, was fifty five seconds. We had to stop coming down that way, because it burned through the insides of our boots. Ahh, to be young again.
Not even young. No thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
To borrow a phrase from my sister-in-law, "Y'all are crazy!" There's not enough money in the world to get me to do that job.
To be honest, when there were several of us up working on a vinyl wrap (The sheet of vinyl that had the advertisement on it that was the size of the billboard face) we could be kind of wacky. I think it took the edge off. We would have to clamber around like monkeys on the billboard frame because the vinyl face was secured with loads of ratchet straps that were hooked around EMT conduit that was slid into sleeves around the perimeter of the wrap. We would make a slice in the vinyl in order to hook the ratchet strap around the EMT to the vinyl and stretch the vinyl as tight as we could. Otherwise the advertisement side would not be flat against the tiffin panels. You also wanted it tight so the wind would not get behind the vinyl, billow it out like a sail and tear it up.
 
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