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Excellent vid ... thanks!

I consider chickens to be an essential part of the homestead ecosystem; without them, the recycling of food waste is a huge problem, and we miss the eggs.

Over the years we've had them, we learned lots of lessons about keeping them alive in this area ... mostly along the lines of what not to do. This coming spring (thaw), we start on the Taj Mahal of chicken coops, and we hope to have them back by beginning- to mid-summer.

By end of summer, I hope to report in on keeping the next batch alive, and whether or not the Taj Mahal system (critter-PROOF) worked. Place yer bets now ...
 

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an egg a day is all the protein most people actually need to keep running.

the Koreans have a dish I won't try to spell it but it translates mixed rice and vegetable , it is served with a sunny side up egg on top and a chilly pepper sauce , very good , very filling and good for you. easy on the digestion also. I just mix all the vegetables in a wok to cook , it makes a fairly fast one bowl feeds you meal.

I might like a couple three eggs on top of mine.

trimmings of vegetables go to chickens and they recycle it into more eggs
 

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Eggs have taken a bad rap from The Big Cholesterol Lie....They are as close to a complete food as you can get. They DO NOT raise your cholesterol and also contain a couple chemicals that lower your risk of heart problems...Each egg contains 6-7gm complete protein (you need 40 gm a day to just barely survive and 60 gm+ to thrive).

One of the best things about chickens as a food source is that you don't have to worry about storage-- you have a continuing daily supply of eggs and can slaughter the birds one meal at a time.
 

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Eggs have taken a bad rap from The Big Cholesterol Lie....They are as close to a complete food as you can get. They DO NOT raise your cholesterol and also contain a couple chemicals that lower your risk of heart problems...Each egg contains 6-7gm complete protein (you need 40 gm a day to just barely survive and 60 gm+ to thrive).

One of the best things about chickens as a food source is that you don't have to worry about storage-- you have a continuing daily supply of eggs and can slaughter the birds one meal at a time.
Eggs actually keep a long time, too. In the store-bought era, we’ve come to think of eggs as a fast-perishable food, like milk, but that’s really not the case.

Our eggs never see a refrigerator, and they don’t get cleaned. Off the counter top, we routinely eat eggs that are a few weeks old. A few days ago, we ate eggs that were almost a year old, at room-temperature the whole time, stored in water and lime. They were completely indistinguishable from “fresh”.

Some of those eggs were laid by accidental box hatches, and, with the seasonality of our local insects and scraps, we wouldn’t have to provide feed to our chickens if we didn’t want to. They’re almost fire-and-forget livestock- and they’re entertaining yard ornaments, to boot.
 

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Our eggs never see a refrigerator, and they don’t get cleaned. Off the counter top, we routinely eat eggs that are a few weeks old. A few days ago, we ate eggs that were almost a year old, at room-temperature the whole time, stored in water and lime. They were completely indistinguishable from “fresh”.
Aye, we had eggs on our counter, then put in the fridge, then back on the counter back in October. We ate the last one Wednesday.
 

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:"eggs that were almost a year old, at room-temperature the whole time, stored in water and lime" An old, old way of storing eggs. Somewhere in one of the old-tme author's books is a story of a girl who sent a note telling of her desire for a husband along with a cask of eggs in lime water, shipped to Alaska during the gold rush. The fellow who found the note tracked her down, found her already married.
 

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"Yard eggs" are $8 a dozen at the farmer's market here. Our yard eggs just cost the feed and time to feed them, and the silly chickens are incredibly entertaining.

I trade eggs for pastry and crepes at the market.
 

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I agree it's more cost effective to get store eggs. But I would rather spend money on eggs I knew came from hens that weren't subsisting in a shoebox for their short, short lives. Plus we get fertilizer, composters, bug control and entertainment out of it.
 

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There is no appreciable difference in the dietary value of "yard" eggs and the commercial variety. A bit more color in the yolk, usually, perhaps a harder shell. Even so, I would prefer to have chickens on the place for all the reasons one keeps livestock. I do not worry all that much about the "shoebox", a chicken is not a philosopher nor are the conditions that bad. No *****, no owls, no foxes---the shoebox chicken has an easier life than most.
 

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Eggs have taken a bad rap from The Big Cholesterol Lie....They are as close to a complete food as you can get. They DO NOT raise your cholesterol and also contain a couple chemicals that lower your risk of heart problems...Each egg contains 6-7gm complete protein (you need 40 gm a day to just barely survive and 60 gm+ to thrive).
I agree fully except for one detail missing. This is only true if there is a rooster and the eggs are fertilized. This is important for hormone balance.
No wonder so many are gay or unsure of what % girl they are when we intentionally remove all the testosterone from our diet by castrating all males, removing roosters etc.

God planned it perfect. Man ruined it.
 

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There is no appreciable difference in the dietary value of "yard" eggs and the commercial variety. A bit more color in the yolk, usually, perhaps a harder shell. Even so, I would prefer to have chickens on the place for all the reasons one keeps livestock. I do not worry all that much about the "shoebox", a chicken is not a philosopher nor are the conditions that bad. No *, no owls, no foxes---the shoebox chicken has an easier life than most.
Umm.

No.

The "shoebox" chicken has a miserable life. And if you've raised chickens, you'd know that they do have personalities. There is no reason to be cruel to any creature, no matter the length of its life.

I've been to a "cage-free" facility. It was a chaotic, filthy mess, a ginormous building one could not enter without first donning a re-breathing mask. The birds were miserable and pretty much bald of feathers. I would reject those eggs on that reason alone, but there is data to suggest that truly free-range eggs are, indeed, nutritionally superior.


The 2007 Mother Earth News egg testing project.

Our testing has found that, compared to official U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient data for commercial eggs, eggs from hens raised on pasture may contain:
  • 1/3 less cholesterol
  • 1/4 less saturated fat
  • 2/3 more vitamin A
  • 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids
  • 3 times more vitamin E
  • 7 times more beta carotene

 

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Umm.

No.

The "shoebox" chicken has a miserable life. And if you've raised chickens, you'd know that they do have personalities. There is no reason to be cruel to any creature, no matter the length of its life.

I've been to a "cage-free" facility. It was a chaotic, filthy mess, a ginormous building one could not enter without first donning a re-breathing mask. The birds were miserable and pretty much bald of feathers. I would reject those eggs on that reason alone, but there is data to suggest that truly free-range eggs are, indeed, nutritionally superior.


The 2007 Mother Earth News egg testing project.

Our testing has found that, compared to official U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient data for commercial eggs, eggs from hens raised on pasture may contain:
  • 1/3 less cholesterol
  • 1/4 less saturated fat
  • 2/3 more vitamin A
  • 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids
  • 3 times more vitamin E
  • 7 times more beta carotene

I remember that egg study! And I've always wondered why nobody followed up on it
 

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I don't like fresh eggs. My family does, but they wouldn't want to take care of the chickens.

Fine by me. I prefer the taste of plain old store bought eggs.
 

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I remember that egg study! And I've always wondered why nobody followed up on it
I wonder how people think that animals breathing in their own effluent, fed antibiotics, and stressed to the point of cannibalism could possibly provide healthy food.
 
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