Chicken Tender again (>:

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by elliemaeg, Apr 28, 2006.

  1. elliemaeg

    elliemaeg Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We are building a new chicken house and yard. I wander if some chickens are better than others for baking or frying. I do know that some varieties are very tough. Are some more tender? Also, what are the best kind for eggs? Or does it make a difference. We have two type in our incubator right now. One is a Belgian Quail my husband wants the other is the one that supposedly lays easter eggs. I know the name but can't think of it right now. Are Belgian Quail good to eat? Lots of questions. Any answers?
    Thanks for any advise!
     
  2. ladycat

    ladycat Chicken Mafioso Staff Member

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    Belgian Quail is a very small breed of bantam. If you want to raise chickens for eating, you'll need a large breed. If you want one that is good for both meat and eggs, Buff Orpingtons are a very good choice.
     

  3. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    Your Easter Egg chickens are Ameraucanas (sp?). They aren't big enough to be good meat birds, either, although much larger than the Belgian Quail. If you want the sort of meat you buy at the grocery store, you need Cornish Cross. None of the dual-purpose breeds grow as quickly or as large as the Cornish Cross. On the other hand, I quit raising the Cornish Cross some years back because they grow so fast they outgrow their feather covering and look really gross; they are prone to breast blisters (large) because they do nothing but sit around and eat; they are prone to leg problems because they grow too quickly; and they are prone to heart problems for the same reason. So I compromise for a little less meat and a lot healthier chickens, and use the dual-purpose breeds, such as white rock, buff orpington, barred rock, and so on.

    Kathleen
     
  4. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Little bantam eggs are perfectly good to eat: You just break a few extra into the pan.

    I have heard that some folks just kept bantams because they were pretty, and just did nothing with the eggs. I never saw the reason for wasting good eggs: my own chickens are banty crosses and some of them have laid small eggs.

    I eat the eggs and enjoy them. :hobbyhors