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We've got a flock of 450+ chickens that just started laying, and they and their 40'x100' winter housing greenhouse is infested with chicken mites! My hand is crawling with mites if I carry a single piece of wood that was in their hen house - it's soooo awful. (From March-Oct we let our hens on pasture, and their hen house lets in fresh air and sunshine year round. Also we use pine shavings as bedding.)

We just processed our old layer batch and their feet were a poor sight to behold- scaly and scabbed. We tried treatments but found it was so impossible to actually get to a point where the mites were completely gone with our size of flock.)

We really don't want this same scenario to happen with these new chickens. We just scraped out all the bedding and power-washed and bleached all of the chickens' nesting boxes, roosts, etc. between flocks but know it barely made a dent in the mite population we have. Does anybody have experience with a treatment that's practical and works for a flock of 450+ chickens? I've heard of ash trays, garlic in their food and as a spray, and oil sprays but I'm wondering if anybody has found something that works and would highly recommend before trying all these options?!
If it helps we're located in SW Washington so we're headed into really wet, cool weather.
Thanks in advance!
 

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Diluted neem oil will take care of small insects and it's not a harsh chemical. I presume the floor is dirt? Mites do love cracks and crevices. You can coat roosts and wood with grease like shortening, can mix neem in that too. There are more harsh chemicals you can also use but I always keep in mind we eat what chickens produce.

Make sure chickens can dust bathe with sand, peat moss, a bit of wood ash. A lot of people like diatomaceous earth but it's a mixed bag. It is useless when wet, shreds respiratory tissue, kills the good insects with the bad, and is stripped mined. I don't use it for those reasons.

Do you have wild birds around and in your greenhouse? Stop feeding wild birds and make your property less attractive to them (eliminate nesting sites) as they can pass on lice and mites and disease to domestic birds (and vice versa). You can trap or shoot invasive birds like starlings and English Sparrows which love to hang out and feed at human settlements.
 

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I can't think of an easy way to take care of the problem. Definitely the building situation should be addressed more thoroughly. In your case I would not hesitate to use chemicals. You will probably have to treat each bird multiple times as well as the building. Is this leg mites, skin mites, or both?
 

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Back in the day the menfolk in my family used Sevin dust for everything like that. Chickens have mites? Sevin. Dog has fleas? Sevin. You think you mighta caught fleas from the dog? Dust yourself in Sevin and go take a flea dip.
 
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