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I went to farmers market today and bought some heirloom Cherokee tomatoes. The tomato is purple when ripe. It has a milder taste than other tomatoes. But what I would like to know is how/what do I do to be able to save the seeds and pot them in green house for next year? Any information would be appreciated. Thank you.
 

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Scoop out seeds and put into a cup, fill cup with water. Let sit two days, pour off gross stuff and fill with water again, let sit for a day. Pour off yuck and add more water. Next day drain water and pour seeds onto a paper towel to dry. After dry put in envelope and label.
 

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Bunny Poo Monger
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Kathy H,

I'm not an authority (Paquebot is) but feel you gave very good directions. The only thing I can add is to store them in a dark package in the root cellar or in the fridge until the next growing season. No moisture or light, and the coolness, helps keep most of the seeds viable until the next growing season.

Fla Gal
 

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To save seeds I just place the seeds and pulp on to a paper napkin, let them dry for a few days then salvage the seeds.
 

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Everyone around here claims those Cherokee Purples are just about the best tomato around.

Of course ... this IS the Cherokee Nation, so I suppose there's a bit of prejudice. :D

In any case, they're the heirlooms I'm planning on growing next year.

BTW ... got my first ripe heirloom tomato of the year a few days ago --- AND IT TASTES LIKE A TOMATO! :confused: I don't know how to explain, except it's the most tomato-y tomato I've ever eaten! :D Pretty yummy!
 

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Kathy's info is close enough. Scoop out seeds into bowl, add equal quantity of water, leave for 3 days at room temperature. (Daily stirring optional.) After 3 days, remove surface layer of scum. Add clean water and decant until only clean seeds remain. Spread thin on paper towel or paper plate until dry.

This process is called fermenting seeds. It is needed to prevent any of a number of diseases which may be carried over via the seeds. Every tomato seed that is sold commercially must undergo that process.

Martin
 
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