Cheese-making question....

Discussion in 'Goats' started by full sun, Nov 9, 2006.

  1. full sun

    full sun Well-Known Member

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    I am trying to make cheese for the first time. And it isn't going well. :shrug:

    I am making a soft chevre and the first ingredient is buttermilk. I have a buttermilk starter from Hoeggers. I followed the directions exactly and it isn't going as it supposed to. The directions say (in a nutshell) to heat the milk, let it cool, stir in measured buttermilk starter, cover, keep at room temperature and a curd will form in 16-18 hours. It had been 23 hours and my mixture has thickened and it has some lumps in it. That's it. This is my second attempt. What am I doing wrong? Any ideas? Suggestions?

    Jennifer
     
  2. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    are you adding the rennet?
    you can go for directions here
    frankhauser's cheese page http://biology.clc.uc.edu/fankhauser/Cheese/CHEESE.HTML
     

  3. MullersLaneFarm

    MullersLaneFarm Well-Known Member

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    If you're just adding buttermilk starter to milk, it sounds as if you're making buttermilk, not cheese.

    Do you have Chevre culture (culture & rennet all in one?)
     
  4. tavia

    tavia Well-Known Member

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    I have tried making buttermilk from the Hoeggers starter and then used it to innoculate milk to make cheese..with very little success. I have since skipped making cheeses that need starter cultures. Now I actually make cheese daily!

    My suggestion is to start with REALLY simple cheese recipes that don't use cultures,
    like PANEER:
    bring (1 gallon)milk to boil
    add a little vinegar or lemon juice (3 or more Tbl) till the curds seperate
    strain through a colandar lined with cheesecloth-add salt, garlic & or herbs if you like
    twist up cloth, press on a cutting board with a plate on top in sink for 2 minutes
    voila..cheese!!
    really hard to mess up

    Then I would try mozzerella (still doesn't need culture) melts and is delicious!
    Then you can save the whey and :hobbyhors make ricotta

    GOOD LUCK!-Tavia
     
  5. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When we make chevre, we chill the raw milk, then pasteurize it, chill again and then warm to 72F. Add 1/8 tsp mesophyllic starter to 1 gallon milk. Stir and hold at 72F for 1 hour. Then add 2/5 drop of rennet. (we make that by adding 1 drop rennet to 5 tsp water and then adding 2 tsp to the cheese). Hold at 72F for 18 hours. We do this by holding it in a glass jar in our gas oven with the pilot light to warm it, the oven door cracked a little. After 18 hours we strain the whey through sterilized cheese cloth and drain curds at room temperature for 2 days. This makes a delicious chevre that we and our friends love.
     
  6. goatmarm

    goatmarm Well-Known Member

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  7. MullersLaneFarm

    MullersLaneFarm Well-Known Member

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  8. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Please don't ruin your wonderful milk by pasteurizing it to make cheese, unless you have to for commercial reasons.

    Any culture, any rennet, any of the culture/rennet combos sold at cheesemaking.com will make wonderful raw milk cheese,that can either be eaten soft, like cream cheese or pressed lightly. Start with their cherve culture.

    Yes do boil all your whey, add your vingear or lemon juice (acid) and make ricotta...but you can make wonderful cheeses with your raw milk!

    Milk the doe, strain the milk, pour it into a 1 gallon container....the stainless or food grade plastic containers they sell at resturant supply houses for steam tables (acemart) work wonderful. If you have had to save milk, gently heat your cold milk to room temp. Add you culture, stir, let it set until the curd breaks....carefully ladel this curd into cheese forms, glass cake pans, and press lightly...or dump the whole thing into a clean pillow case, let the whey drip out until it drips no further, then salt (1 teaspoon of good kosher salt), store in rubbermaid...or press it at this stage. It's very versatile. Once you have this process down, then move to other cultures, or capture you own. Vicki