Cheapest wood flooring??

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mommykood, Jan 9, 2005.

  1. mommykood

    mommykood Active Member

    Messages:
    34
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2004
    Location:
    WI
    Our owner-built homestead is built up to the "finished" flooring part. We are questioning what to put on top of the OSB subflooring.

    We need something cheap (we have 2000 sq. feet to cover) and something that is wood (or wood product or look-alike product). We can't afford anything over about $1.00 per sq. foot. We have no wood to cut down and mill ourselves, either (our homestead is flatland).

    Right now, our options we have seen are:

    1. CDX 1/4" or 1/2" wood 4'x8' sheets (would later be stained and varnished)from Menards (our cheapest store of choice). I have seen this in multiple Amish homesteads in our area; looks nice; is quick to put in; is cheap (about .50 per sq. foot, I believe). However, it also may not have much of a resale value (we want to sell out rather quickly, after we build up another owner-built homestead).

    2. Laminate wood-look flooring from Menards (on sale, maybe $1.00 a sq. foot); glueless; tongue-and-groove.

    3. Amish-made wood tongue-and-groove flooring (don't know cost of this; two Amish farms make it near our homestead). Would need to be stained and varnished.

    4. ???? Help! :) LOL


    Thanks! :) Jen
     
  2. LizMovingNorth

    LizMovingNorth Member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    NJ (hopefully VT soon)
    Do you have a "Lumber Liquidators" near you? They are all over the east coast but I don't know what you've got in WI. The one here in NH was selling beautiful southern yellow pine flooring for 99cents a sq foot, or reasonable looking laminate flooring for 79c a sq/ft. I'm sure the laminate is not the best quality and would eventually scratch and dull, but if you're selling quickly, it might be a good choice.

    I would check the Amish stuff first, if you can get that at a reasonable price it will look great...people looking to buy will be able to see the quality.

    Liz

    edit: Here's the website, http://www.lumberliquidators.com/locator.shtml, doesn't look like there are any in WI, but you might have something similar.
     

  3. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    799
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Location:
    Northern Wisconsin
    No brainer. Go with the laminate except for the bathrooms. To control costs, don't purchase the laminate trim/end pieces/etc, but use pine or cedar.
    In the bathrooms, install a neutral color vinyl. It should last 10 years.

    By the way, if you are just moving into your house, you'll get crucified by the tax man if you sell a newly built house. If however, you live in the house for at least 2 years, this puts you in a far more favorable tax category. A call to your tax person/CPA is in order.
     
  4. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Washington State
    It's going to depend on where you live and what's readily available. What I can get won't be what you can get. I'd think that laminate is cheaper no matter where you live...but could be wrong!
     
  5. 3girls

    3girls Well-Known Member

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    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2004
    Location:
    SE PA, zone 6b
    I haven't done any exploring on this, so my info may be way out of date.

    There used to be t&g subflooring sold. It was pine or some such and designed to be subflooring. Stained and varnished, it was a beautiful surface--somewhat country in appearance.

    We once got some salvage wood from an old bldg that was being demolished in downtown Seattle. It was old douglas fir and was just beautiful on our floor.
     
  6. kygaloot

    kygaloot Member

    Messages:
    9
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2004
    Location:
    KY
    Skip the synthetics and go with real wood.

    The tongue and groove yellow pine make for a very nice floor. In many areas you can purchase it cheaper if you ask for "car siding". This is the tongue and groove yellow pine that they side railroad cars with. It usually goes for ~$1.00/ft^2. Don't worry about the dents and dings it will inevitably show. This only adds to the patina with age.