Chamomile Germination

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Unregistered-1427815803, Jun 21, 2004.

  1. I have planted Chamomile seeds several times and they never germinate. I know they are supposed to take a long time, but after 2-3 months I give up.

    I hate to break down and get plants.

    Any info would be appreciated.
     
  2. lyteora

    lyteora Well-Known Member

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    va
    I thought it was just me, my chamomile and tomotillo's never came up and I can't find plants locally. So I would like ideas too. Thanks Lyte
     

  3. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Chamomile should germinate in about 10 days. Chances are that the seeds were planted too deep. They should be sprinkled on top of the soil and a very light dusting of a cover, if covered at all. If you attempted to start them inside or in pots, spread the top half inch of the potting soil in an open area of your garden. They may still come up. If not, the seed will last a long time and may come up next spring. It prefers to germinate in the cooler months of early spring.

    It's just another "weed" in my garden. Every spring, I kill hundreds of the seedlings as well as uprooting several square feet of the original stand as it continues to expand. Once you have it established, you have it forever.

    Martin
     
  4. shepmom

    shepmom Well-Known Member

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    USA
    Add me to the list of no luck with chamomile seeds. Twice I've tried. If I find plants in this area I'll plant a few of them and maybe they will grow like weeds then. :haha:
     
  5. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Don't quote me on this but I don't think that chamomile seed likes warm weather. With me, they are one of the first "weeds" to show up. By late May or early June, no more new ones. In the fall, a few start showing up again and those easily survive winter despite being tiny plants. For certain, they have no trouble spreading on their own once they are established!

    Martin
     
  6. OD

    OD Well-Known Member

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    I had the same problem with catnip, & finally I bought 1 plant & set it out last summer. This spring, I have catnip all over the back yard. If I ever find a Chamomile plant, I'm going to get it. It's just easier.
     
  7. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

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    NE Ohio
    I broke down and bought a tiny chamomile plant a few years ago. Now it is taking over the world. I even find it growing along the creek bed, 500 feet from the original site! I could bale it like hay, there is so much of it. I'm in zone 5, by the way. Sometimes I see little green sprigs of it starting in February. It blooms by early June, dies, self seeds all over again, and sometimes blooms a second time in late fall. If you really want it, go ahead and buy a little plant. I wager you'll be bringing armloads in before long. You will be able to make enough tea to sooth the whole county to sleep!
     
  8. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    OD, catnip is another of my favorite "weeds" but that is one which continues to germinate quite nicely from April to October. I actually purchased seed many years ago despite the fact that I could easily have found a "wild" plant. My desire was to have true catmint. Now I have it everywhere but only allow a few plants to grow and mature. They are very handy to have around if you have vegetables which need insect pollination. When catnip is blooming, it will attract almost every type of bee within miles. A downside is that the flowers also are enjoyed by cabbage butterflies. However, when they land to begin feeding, a quick swat with my cap assures that that is the last time they'll bother my cabbages!

    Martin