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WV , hilltop dweller
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am giving serious thought to giving small survival boxes to my nieces for christmas, help me design them.
Both families are young;mid 20s for the adults and one has 2 children under 4 the other has one boy 12,one boy 3 and a "bun in the oven"... Now as far as I know they don't have any emergency savvy at all. One husband is a nurse,his wife is a corrections officer(pregnant and on leave). The other husband is into electronics and his wife is food industry(catering/bartending). Although their mother(my sister) plants a garden I do not think either of them have.
Here is my inital small list(money is tight under 50 dollar list)

Candles(jar type,small children)
Matches
Flashlight
Lightsticks
small basic first aid kit
Dry packaged gatorade mix
Wet wipes
Hard candies
Bottled water(or emergency water packs to keep longer)
Canned cheese
Emergency blankets
Trash bags(several sizes)
Several dollar store toys

This is just typing as I think, thought to pack in a box, seal and tell them not to open until they are snowed in/without light/heat/ or after they get where they have to evacuate too....
 

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Crazy Dog Lady
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As a mom, I like the idea.... but handing small children a sealed box and telling them not to open it for any length of time just isn't going to work. The temptation of opening the box will be too great. The older ones might be able to hold out for a few days, but the younger ones will be in it as soon as the opportunity presents. Maybe you could give it to their parents to store somewhere "out of sight, out of mind"??

But I do think its a great idea.....
 

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Uber Tuber
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I would give the matches to the parents, in their own boxes. Not to such small children.
 

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WV , hilltop dweller
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3,613 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
sorry I wasn't clearer..the box goes to the family to set in a closet or by the front door as a covered stand to catch stuff like mail, not be opened by the children! The 2 moms are my nieces.Think I'll add a roll of TP and some age approriate/size diapers. All the things I heard that those stuck in NO at the 'dome would have loved to have keeps filtering back to my memory. And tape an envelope on the outside with an inventory so they(the parents) don't open it to "just see what is in it"...
 

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Well I know some towns have a nature perserve type place and at time they give "nature walks" for children. The park rangers or guides take the kids around and teach them about the different plants. Could you find out if they offer something like that in their area. Also maybe if there is a children forestry books so they learn some stuff as well. Maybe each kids gets a different book?
 

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Personally, I would throw in an oil lamp with a bottle of lamp oil and a multi-tool. An emergency radio would be nice, but might be a bit much.
 

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hmm - at first thought - a deck of playing cards. Maybe a small manual of essentials.

Small radio
batteries
They are more expensive, but over here you can buy small tins of food, where you pop the lid and it heats automatically. Might be useful for "real" emergencies?

Will keep thinking for you.



hoggie
 

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God Smacked Jesus Freak
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would a jar of peanut butter go over better than canned cheese? (just thinking of the kids, it would be cheaper too).

I dont' know how active the families are(heh, not that it should matter, EVERYONE should learn to be a happy camper!), but a different angle for the kids(except for the baby I guess) would be to get each of them their own camelback/camelback knockoff(WalMart sells one for about 25$, what I mean is a small pack with a bladder and tube in it--kids love drinking out of those) and put in it a candy bar, powerbar, space blanket, a knife for the older kid, a whistle, a compass(for the older one), a colorful bandana. If you knit or crochet you can add a hat and mittens. Or you can carve them a hiking stick and let them decorate it with leather or beads or painting.

Now here's the most important part--take them hiking, get the out in the woods, teach them the basics of getting along in the sticks. Take them fishing. My kids and my sister's kids all got a kick out of having their own packs with their stuff. They can keep the packs(baby bobs) at the ready at home.

That way it's a gift as well as a useful thing and a door to building a relationship with doing something together and teaching them to be more self reliant. Much more fun than a box that sits by the door waiting for "someday". Not that such a box wouldn't be a great gift, but just saying seize the day.
 

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This is a bit different but would be very useful. Make them a binder of "what to do if". Pick the most likely scenarios for their location like earthquake, tornado, winter storm, wind storm, sip chemical leak, extended power outages and routes to evac. Add some sections on cooking without electricity (candle cooking), hygiene (composting toilets and spray bottle showers), water storage and purification (what to do to the tub drain before filling so the water doesn't slowly leak out), etc.

To your box maybe add an inexpensive wind up radio (make sure it gets am stations too), a wind up flashlight, a good map or pocket atlas, phone numbers and addresses of relatives, emergency blankets, a bunch of white tea lights in metal holders and some quality matches, a small first aid kit, silver tape, heavy plastic garbage bags. hand sanitizer,
 

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I would also download and print some of the free emergency manuals available at the govready website to include with the emergency box.

I think you have a great idea. I might just borrow it!
 

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Maybe next year add a few MRE's..., jug of water.
 

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Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs
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I think I'd pack the emergency kit in a backpack or duffle, something quick and easy to pick up. I think I'd also have a secondary bag in there that held "food" or in this case... a list. Items that can be grabbed from the shelves and stuffed in that sack: peanut butter, bread, fruit, etc. Open bag, follow list, go.

Don't forget pets.

PetSmart sells plastic frisbees for a dollar.. they make great plates, and if you don't need plates, toys.
 

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All of those are great ideas, and could be adapted to the ages of the children, personally my boys love having their 'backpack' with all the 'cool' stuff in it. We come from a family of hunters so their lots of talk of guns, knives, animals, etc. Recently my FIL gave one of my boys (6yrs old) a backpack with several items:

multi purpose knife (Dad keeps this)
whistle
compass
rope
velcro (he uses it as a belt)
hat
a few other items I can't remember

then I added:
first aid stuff (bandaids and antibiotic cream)
personal bottle of water
emergency blanket
paper & crayons (he loves to draw)
protien bar
wind up flash light

I taught him how to take care of someone elses boo-boo. (wash it off, dry it, cream, bandaid)
We also talked about the other items in the bag, and what they could be used for. We take this bag camping. It gives him and sense of security, and stability - and that is priceless in an emergency. Working with them to give them knowledge to handle those situations (at an age appropriate level) is the best thing you could do for them.

Also, for the older ones, this book might be of interest.
 
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