Chainsaws don't injure people, people injure people

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by primroselane, Sep 12, 2004.

  1. primroselane

    primroselane Well-Known Member

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    After any storm like Frances, the two sounds you hear most are chain saws and the drone of generators. I bought a new chain saw Thursday night. Al with a power tool is a frightening thing, but Al with a CHAIN SAW -- that is a sight to see.

    This is a warning from one chain saw expert:

    The chain saw is the most dangerous hand tool that can be purchased on the open market. It requires no license and no training to own or operate it. An overall average of 40,000 injuries and deaths occur annually in the U.S. This figure is just the "reported" accidents given by hospitals willing or able to furnish the information. That figure does not include out-patient visits to the doctor.

    Most chain saw accidents are preventable. The only answer to reducing these accidents is proper training and knowledge with a lot of time using a saw -- which is experience. You can gain experience the hard way and have the scars to prove it or you can do a little preventative reading. (More resources)

    The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says:

    There were over 28,500 chain saw injuries in 1999. More than 36 percent were injuries to the legs and knees.

    The average chainsaw injury requires 110 stitches and the average medical cost was $5,600 in 1989. Data according to The Davis Garvin Agency, an insurance underwriter specializing in loggers insurance. In 2000, corresponding costs can be estimated to be over $12,000.
    Medical costs for chainsaw injuries based on these facts amount to about $350 million per year.
     
  2. Stand_Watie

    Stand_Watie Well-Known Member

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    I own a chainsaw and multiple firearms. It's a lot easier to use the firearms safely than the chainsaw. Even when paying very careful attention during use, the chainsaw presents a greater danger of accidental injury/death to the operator than the firearms.

    Just like firearms though, the best safety device on a chainsaw is between the ears of the user. Good training, judgement and prudence are very much in order and should keep you safe.
     

  3. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

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    You said it! Which is why I got rid of my chainsaw years ago. Even after training by a skilled user, I knew I would not feel confident enough or use it often enough to maintain those skills.

    I now have a good bowsaw and larger pruning saw, as well as a sharp axe, to do all I need to do. Soemtimes it takes me some time, but I enjoy the quiet while I do it. And I am much safer.

    Kudos to those of you who can handle one safely.
     
  4. Wilbur

    Wilbur Well-Known Member

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    So so true. They are wonderfully efficient machines, but can be so dangerous. I worked as a logger and had my share of close calls do to unstable trees, gusts of wind at the wrong time or just mis-reading a side lean. The one time I got hurt? cutting a tree at my dad's place on the edge of his pond. I was leaning through some brush cutting a little three inch swamp maple and my hat fell off. It was heading into the pond (which is certainly no big deal). Before I could even register a thought my right hand shot out to try to catch it so it didn't fall in and my fingers hit the chain. fortunately just a grazing, no major damage and about 10 -15 stitches to close the cuts. Could have been far worse. Just an instinctual thing that got me in trouble. Glad it wasn't worse thats for sure. Be safe in the woods!!!
     
  5. deberosa

    deberosa SW Virginia Gourd Farmer!

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    There are a few things I won't attempt around my homestead and using a chain saw is one of them. If I were injured I would certainly bleed to death before anyone would notice... It's work I hire out to a professional. They get the wood in small chunks on the ground and I take it from there.

    I do have a small electric chain saw that comes in really handy. I also found that the "saws alls" or I think they are called reciprocating saws work with a courser wood blade and is excellent for anything under 6 inches in diameter.

    Now I don't feel like a scaredy cat hiring out this work. :D
     
  6. Stand_Watie

    Stand_Watie Well-Known Member

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    Sawing by hand can be good excercise too! Two birds with a single stone.

    It's not to be wondered at that farming consistently ranks as one of the more physically hazardous occupations.
     
  7. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    You defiantly said a mouth full.I worked at a saw meal for 5 years you would be surprised how many times i seen an employ using a saw that didn't no how to handle or even work one.Saying that i have had a 394husky with a 32inch bar knock me off my feet, so even after years of experience stuff happens the difference in my case was i was knocked down,not cut.Always be prepared for kick back!Or in may case run out,The log pinched the chain causing the saw to push back out of the cut,hard.There is no substitute for experience here but atleast a lesson from someone who noes will help.For gods sake ask,this isnt something you want to learn on your own.

    And falling trees in the direction you want also needs to be tought,nothing hurts worse than watching a three ton tree fall on your new truck.Or your head!Of coarse you may not be around to feel the latter.
     
  8. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    Eyah.. the one time my husband gets hurt is using a bow saw! Cut right through the tendons on the back of his hand! HAND tools are dangerous at my place!

    2 things we don't use the chainsaw without: logging chaps and logging helmets. Expensive, the chaps, but the one time the blade dropped down and hit them the fibers wrapped around the blade and stopped it in a heartbeat: no damage to the husband under the chaps.

    Worth every dime. Worth the weight to wear. If you're a woman handling a heavy saw... go get some!