chain saw chain sharpening

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by manfred, Oct 23, 2006.

  1. manfred

    manfred Well-Known Member

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    I'm really tired of taking my chains in to be sharpened. Anyone here know where to buy one of those electric driven chain sharpeners like they use in the shops?
     
  2. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    www.baileys-online.com

    Bailey's has them, but I don't particularly like them. I just use a file. Only takes a couple of minutes. I touch up the chain after each tank of fuel, so it never gets dull.
     

  3. manfred

    manfred Well-Known Member

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    I've tried touching up the chain for 20 years or so and just can't seem to get it right. I had some people recommend to me to just buy a new chain each time. Sharpened chains just aren't the same as a new one. I do get maybe 2 or 3 times the run time on a new chain than a sharpened one.
     
  4. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Check out Bailey's, and see what they have. They have several different models and price ranges. You may like them fine. The file's just always worked well for me. By touching up the teeth every tankful, and knocking down the rakers every so often, I keep it cutting like a new chain.

    Edited to add: I just checked Northern Tool, and they have them as well.
     
  5. manfred

    manfred Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the links!
     
  6. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Baileys will have true pro model. NH will have Oregon like mine though price is way up over what I gave. Harbor Freight or ebay will have the Chinese $50 version of the Oregon. One person on this forum said the cheap China one works fine for him. If I were buying one now, I'd try Chinese one I suppose. The low end Oregon one isnt worth the premium price they want anymore though it works ok. Motor gets kinda hot if you use it very long. I bet you could find good used true pro model for what a new consumer Oregon runs now.
     
  7. mohillbilly

    mohillbilly Well-Known Member

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    I havent ever taken a chain in to be resharpened, you dont need to. If you use a file, are you also using a guide with it? You CANNOT effectively sharpen a chain without it, And i will argue that with anyone!!!! Everytime i sharpen a chain, and touch it up after a few tanks of fuel, it cuts better than a new chain, each time, everytime.... I have tried electric grinders for sharrpening chains, never liked them, they can be too aggressive and create heat which is not good. especially when an inexpereiced guy uses it.
     
  8. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    You can get an attachment for a Dremel tool at Lowe's, along with all the proper stones Its fast and easy
     
  9. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Well, I'll just have to argue that with you, because I don't use a guide, and I sharpen mine very effectively.
     
  10. mohillbilly

    mohillbilly Well-Known Member

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    Arguement accepted......lets rumble!
     
  11. Rockin'B

    Rockin'B Well-Known Member

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    You also need to dress the rakers. The height of the raker relative to the cutter is also very important.

    Go to Baileys website and order a catalog. It's full of good stuff!

    http://www.baileys-online.com/
     
  12. mohillbilly

    mohillbilly Well-Known Member

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    Very true......
     
  13. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    I've used file freehand, file with various jigs and guides, dremel type run off battery, and shop type. The shop type wins in my book by a landslide as far as fastest, easiest, and making the chain last the longest. Especially for somebody only using saw once a year to get own firewood. Freehand or jig is on the saw and requires you to compensate for slot in bar being worn and chain moving side to side while you are sharpening it. Dremel type use small round bit turning at high rpm and tend to burn the metal if not real careful, they also done with chain on the saw. Shop type is off the saw. You might get close results with careful use of guide and file with chain off the saw and clamped in vise but not on saw without lots and lots of experience.

    Forget the kid in the hardware store getting 2 or 3 sharpenings before junking chain, you as person shelling out money for chains will be motivated to take bare minimum of metal off chain and get many more sharpenings. Dont take all teeth down to size of one short broken or damaged one either like it says in instruction manual. Even if you ground the short or damaged tooth clear off, the chain would still work. Taking all chain down to size of one broken or damaged one just causes you to buy a new chain that much earlier. And a properly sharpened chain will cut as well as a new one.
     
  14. lonelytree

    lonelytree Guest

  15. mink

    mink Well-Known Member

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    the thing about using the guide for filing is that it holds the file up at the top of the tooth where it needs to be .......use the guide and check the depth of the rakers and you wont go wrong. another thing is too sharpen before it gets too dull and in 2-3 strokes on a tooth and you should be back in business,,,,mink
     
  16. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    i use a clip on file rig, and it sharpens the chain better than a electro chain grinder. those grind off way to much tooth at one hit.

    a file and a jig is your best bet, just learn to do it right.
     
  17. FoxfireWoman

    FoxfireWoman Questing for Simplicity

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    We bought the Oregon 511A and just for the chain saw it has more than paid for itself. But we also modify it from time to time to sharpen band saw blades and it does a wonderful job of that also.

    I think we paid close to 300 for it, purchased new off eBay, but it has been worth every penny. Wouldn't go back to sharpening with a file ever - the difference between the two is like day and night and as someone already said, the chains last longer since you can quickly touch them up and take less material off.

    Kat
     
  18. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have one of the comercial units,

    I would like to see some of you guy resharpen some of the chains I get in with a file,

    yes it great when you don't have sand embeded in the wood, or and you can cut for three or 4 tanks of fule, but then the chain won't cut butter after one tank of fule, it takes more than a file IMO to reset the chain to cut correctly,

    when we go out cutting we will take 6 to 8 chains with us,

    I find the Oregon sharpener, 511A I know baileys sells them and I think Northern does too, http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/...tt=chain sharpener&N=100&storeId=6970&Ntk=All

    yes there expensive, but I have felt it worth the investment,
     
  19. Countrybumpkin

    Countrybumpkin Well-Known Member

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    I bought one of the china/oregons from harbor freight, and have used to 2 years, sharpening both my own, and others, and it has worked great! Well worth the $50 I paid for it!
     
  20. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    I learned to sharpen my own chains after I hit a nail and dented a tooth. The saw shop ground down an almost new chain to match the bad tooth. Cut its life by two thirds.

    I clamp the bar in a vise, then file the chain on the bar. If the bar is worn I steady the chain with one hand while I file with the other. I have one of the clip-on guides that I use to maintain the cutting angle, but I've done it so long now that I rarely look at the guide. If I am going to be working all day I just sharpen the chain on the saw in the woods. I've seen pulpwood cutters do this years ago--they make their living in the woods and they do not wait for saw shops.

    Sharpening your own chains with a file, once you have learned how, will make your chains go much farther. Properly done they will cut as well or better than an new chain and you can use them until you break off so many teeth that you are tired of looking at them. I generally have to take out links before my chains are worn out.

    One exception; When I cut off stumps at ground level my chains do not last very long. Bars either--dirt eats them up.
    Ox