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Discussion Starter #1
Sharon (FL of Vegetables) and TESTERS... The previous vegetables chapter posting place was getting REALLY full, so I have started a new one. I'm experimenting this morning with making the current chapter topics easier for you all to find. Bear with me...
Gratefully,
Carla
 

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Kangkong with Belacan "blah-chan" is one of the most
common and popular vegetable dishes in Malaysia - basically,
pound and fry chilis onions garlic and dried fermented shrimp
paste, than add greens. I haven't tried to make it in this
country but I could try it with spinach (not sure DH will eat it,
though).
 

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First picking of grean beans, Tenderpick from Burpee. Was a good picking, somewhat light as I should have weeded better. Been busy preparing for a family reunion and the garden has suffered some.

We found planting in either a single row or a sparsely planted wide row works best for germination. If the bean plants are too close together they don't all germinate.

Tonight's supper - fresh beans, cooked with onion and ham! And corn bread, of course.
Yummy,
Debbie
 

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Leaf hoppers are horrible on the potatoe plants again this year. Last year wasn't bad, but the prior year was. Leaf hoppers are very hard to see - I use a magnifying glass - but they make the plant look like it's horribly wilted. They suck the life out of the plants.

Used Rotenone (sp?) on them last night and they seemed better this morning.
Debbie
 

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[quote="beulahland" We found planting in either a single row or a sparsely planted wide row works best for germination. If the bean plants are too close together they don't all germinate.
Debbie[/quote]

I must have been tired-er than I realized when I posted this! I meant to say POLLINATE not germinate!!
Debbie
 

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Sweet Potato-Cooking
page 302, 9th Edition

Please add that cinnamon, brown sugar and real butter melted together and slathered on a baked sweet potato is divine......or better than that!

Anne
BCR
 

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Our first harvest was of cilentro. Planted peanuts were dug up by birds(guess). Covered with row covers afterwards. No problems. Covered potatoes with straw and hay from goats' pen. Good luck with some things from Pinetree but will try someone else next year. Chard should be ready soon. Fertilized several days ago and plants looking better. Soil is mostly sand. Sweet corn eaten by rabbits, birds, ground squirrels. White corn planted nearer house and earlier not touched; doing well. Strawberries purchased from farmers' market slow to establish but OK now.
 

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My husband picked squash blooms today or the girls to deep fry and they tasted fair, takes a little getting use to. He will pick our first mess of yellow crook neck squash this afternoon and I will fry them with onions and hopefully have some other vegetable with cornbread with them for dinner tomorrow. Elizabeth1 :D
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Elizabeth, your recipe report would be much more helpful to me if it is in regular format. You name the edition number (9th or 10th you're working from), page number, name of recipe, rating you give the recipe from 1 to 5 (1 is Awful, 2 Poor, 3 Average, 4 Good, and 5 Great), plus your comments on the recipe. But maybe you didn't use a recipe out of the book for the squash blossoms? I couldn't give you a tally point for the above entry as is. Maybe you could go back and add the missing info for me???
Gratefully,
Carla
 

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I am in sugar snap pea heaven and was wondering if I could
try to freeze them. Checked the 10th ed, pea section p61
and on, and couldn't find the answer - it does say snow
peas are not good to freeze.

I don't have any experience (well, succesful experience) at
freezing veg, this is our first year with a chest freezer...
anyone have any suggestions on if this is possible and what
a good way would be?

Lisa
 

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I agree with what's in the 10th edition, p66, though you might
say the flesh is bland and tasteless; it's not bad, just blah.
I even tried to sweeten and dry it, it still, really, has no
flavor.

Of the 4 squash varieties I tried direct seeding and ignoring
last year, it did by far the best; the other pumpkins didn't
germinate (or were eaten by bugs when wee sprouts), and
the acorns produced just two small ones, while these
produced 3 to 5 or more huge squash (they look like small
watermelons).

I seem recall one large squash produced about 1/2 cup
seeds, but not sure of my memory; I do know it didn't seem
like a lot for all the squash and space so I'm not growing
them any more.

I did have a problem with some of my seeds molding when
trying to dry/store them. They looked dry but they weren't.

This year I'm growing snackjack pumpkin - I hear this
variety has both good edible seeds and tasty flesh; hopefully
it will produce well.

Lisa
 

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9th edition, pg. 320 -
freezing summer squash/zuc - recommend mentioning cutting out seeds if they are too large. I froze the squash on a cookie sheet and then put in plastic containers so I could separate the frozen portion to pull out what was needed.

squash relish - yellow and/or zuc can be subsituted for cukes or green tomatoes in any relish recipe.

speg squash - freezing - cut in half lengthwise. Scoop out seeds. Steam until fork tender. Pull out strands of squash and cool. When completely cool, freeze in containers.

Debbie
 

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Boy, do I have a good kimchi recipe! We're just about to put up the first of about 50lbs we use in a year. We love the stuff. Not only is it wonderful tasting, but studies suggest that kimchi is actually more nutritious than its component vegetables, that the lactofermentation doubles the amount of vitamins C, B1, B12 and Niacin. The process of fermentation also creates natural antibiotics that attack ecoli, listeria, etc... so it is a great thing to eat with meat or store-bought food.

Here's the recipe: Cabbage and Radish Kimchi

3 tbsp pickling salt
5 cups water
1 lb chinese cabbage/bok choy/other greens with crisp stems
1 lb daikon or carrot
1 1/2 tbsp fresh ginger, minced
4-6 scallions, cut into rounds
1 1/2 tbsp Korean Ground Red Pepper (evergreen seeds sells seeds for this pepper. We've used cayenne, which is a bit hotter, or ancho, which is much cooler. A good substitute is sweet paprika and cayenne mixed half and half.)
1 tsp sugar

Chop the daikon and chinese cabbage into 2 inch chunks. Dissolve 2 tbsp plus 2 tsp salt in the water. Cover the vegetables in a bowl or pot with the brine, and let them stand 12 hours+. Drain the vegetables, but keep the brine. Combine veggies with remaining ingredients, including the last tsp of salt. Pack the mixture into a large jar or crock (2 quart size works best for us). Pour enough brine over the veggies to cover. Push a plastic bag into the mouth of the jar, and add the remaining brine. Seal the bag (this keeps air and dust out of the mix while fermenting, but a crock with a lid is ok too.) Let the kimchi ferment for 3-6 days, or until as sour as you like. Store the kimchi in a fridge, cool cellar, or as the koreans do, bury it in the ground. It will keep nearly forever.

Do *not* can - pasteurization kills the good bacteria and ruins the flavor.
 

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Due to a very busy schedule this June I did not clean up my spring garden area. I left the cabbage stems after picking the main head. Usually the heat and/or grasshoppers ruins any side shoots that grows off the stems (like with brocelli) but this year I got the sweets, tenderest, allbeit small, heads forming off the center of the old stem. This worked out great as these went into the veggie stew I made yesterday. There's usually such a gap of time between the cole crops and tomatoes and green beans that I don't get to add cabbage to the veggie stew all the time. This year was wonderful.

BTW, the saurkrat did not ferment. It spoiled before it fermented so the chickens enjoyed it instead of us. I don't know if it's cause our temps are so high by then (outside temps are well into the 80's - 90's) that even with the air conditioning running it's not the same as just cool weather inside. You'd think after 3 years of failure I'd give up!!

Debbie
 

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9th ed.
p. 300 boiled potatoes 5
p. 301 Baked potatoes 5
Potato Salad 5
Hash Browns 5
- I never realized hash browns are so easy to make, we will be having these a lot more often.
Mashed Potatoes 5 ( I also like to add herbs and garlic and sour cream into mine)

p. 346 Fried Green Tomatoes 4 I prefer the egg and flour version.

p. 271 Rhubarb Sauce 5 I add a pinch of salt

p. 265 Boiled Asparagus 5 you can cook asparagus in a ziplock bag in the microwave and it is very delicious. wash the asparagus, bag it don't seal all the way and microwave it for about a minute, very quick and I would argue that more vitamins were preserved this way.
 

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Well these things were a complete failure. I have some radish plants that are pretty big, with some nice blossoms on them. I picked a few of them and they have no radish on the bottom, just a straight 1/4 inch stem/root. No idea what I did wrong. Followed the planting instructions to the "T"...oh well, will try again next year.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Rusty, you blinked and the perfect picking stage for your radishes went by. You plant the radish. It quickly grows and makes the root. If you don't pick it at the ideal size and age, which is YOUNG, what happens next is that it pulls the stored energy back out of that root and uses it to grow a tall stem, to flower, and then make seed. That's the life cycle of the radish. You can save the seed and replant.
Carla
 
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