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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Wonderful advice, also, Sharon! I do have a little on Permaculture at the beginning of the Tree chapter 9th and in the beginning of the Intro to Plants chapter, 10th. I've been rather put off by them because they're so expensive. Never have taken the course from anybody. Your advice on getting by giving is indeed sound!
Gratefully,
Carla
 

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Notice: these comments are my opiniions only and may not reflect your views or opinions


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In one discussion there is a reference to a husband "Mike". It might be good to add a comment {former, ex, etc} just for clarity sake.


What is a tightwad :

Felt to me like a lecture rather than a how to. It might be a good addition to put in following this article something like this: A Road Map to Tightwaddery with a brief list of how tos.

I did not see any reference to Amy Dacyczyn's Tightwads Gazette - available from Amazon.com for $13.99

Complete Tightwad Gazette
Amy Dacyczyn
ISBN: 0375752250
Format: Paperback, 959pp
Pub. Date: January 1999 Publisher: Random House,

If Carla is, as we will all agree the Queen of Country Living, I would probably put Amy as Queen of Tightwadery

If it was there and I missed it just ignore my comments.
 

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Comments on Tightwaddery were supposed to be about the How to Pinch a Penny.

Having gone through alot of these steps myself it seems sometimes that attaining the frugal lifestyle can seem an insurmountable task, especially for someone from a city mindset heading for a less than complicated existance.

I just thought it might be helpful to give them a starting point with a few easier steps top set their feet on the road.

If my comments angered anyone I am truly sorry. Commenting on anothers writing touches alot of hot buttons. I am only trying to review the oddments section as I understood I was supposed to do.
 

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Carla AND everyone else,

I'm sorry, I just don't know where to put this...and you are probably used to people sending things to the wrong place. :rolleyes:

My husband and I believe that it would be an extremely helpful section of your book to give the nutrition value of basic food items.

I think an example would include the natural food, plus the objective measurement to tell people what small, medium, or large is...Oh, for the example, all the numbers are completely made up. I really wish I had this information....see?

Apple (1 medium, or 1/3 cup sauced). 3 grams fiber (2 grams soluable, 1 gram insoluable), 30 grams carbohydrate. 0 grams protein. X vit A, X vit C, X vit XYZ :p

I don't know that % of the daily value would count, as that differs so much for the amount of calories a person takes in.

Think about it....if you are searching for independence, then you don't have any labels to rely on. Yes, we often look at the 'color variety' on our plates, and another trick is to look at the plate and fill 50% with green, 25% with starch and 25% with protein...but again, what about vitamins? Being independent is exactly what I want, but I am also wanting to know I've gotten the nutrition amounts correct....."eat lots of leafy green veggies" isn't an adequate answer for someone trying to feed a family....what are the creative ways to get the iron/vitamin A,C,D and K my family needs?

Get it?

I think it would be WAY valuable for edition 10.

warmly,

Jeanne
 

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Carla AND everyone else,

I'm sorry, I just don't know where to put this...and you are probably used to people sending things to the wrong place. :rolleyes:

My husband and I believe that it would be an extremely helpful section of your book to give the nutrition value of basic food items.

I think an example would include the natural food, plus the objective measurement to tell people what small, medium, or large is...Oh, for the example, all the numbers are completely made up. I really wish I had this information....see?

Apple (1 medium, or 1/3 cup sauced). 3 grams fiber (2 grams soluable, 1 gram insoluable), 30 grams carbohydrate. 0 grams protein. X vit A, X vit C, X vit XYZ :p

I don't know that % of the daily value would count, as that differs so much for the amount of calories a person takes in.

Think about it....if you are searching for independence, then you don't have any labels to rely on. Yes, we often look at the 'color variety' on our plates, and another trick is to look at the plate and fill 50% with green, 25% with starch and 25% with protein...but again, what about vitamins? Being independent is exactly what I want, but I am also wanting to know I've gotten the nutrition amounts correct....."eat lots of leafy green veggies" isn't an adequate answer for someone trying to feed a family....what are the creative ways to get the iron/vitamin A,C,D and K my family needs?

Get it?

I think it would be WAY valuable for edition 10.

warmly,

Jeanne
 

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The absolute best book I've ever seen for nutritional information is in 'Laurel's Kitchen', the 1970's classic of vegetarian cooking. This is by Laurel Robertson & was re-published in 1986 as The New Laurel's Kitchen. It's available from the usual used book web sites. This info takes up about 26 pages of tiny print, so it may be better to refer to this book than to find space to re-publish that much info.

Diane W (beaglady)
 

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There is definitely some nutritional information about vegetables, fruits and grains in the book, but more would certainly be welcome. My favorite source of nutritional info is _Nourishing Traditions_ by Sally Fallon. I second the recommendation of _Laurel's Kitchen_ although with all the debate about the value of grains in the diet, I don't know that everyone would agree.

You are absolutely right that if you are trying to feed your family, you need to know what foods are healthy, but the commonsense info that Carla gives - little or no white sugar, whole grains, natural fats in reasonable quantities, balanced meals - protein, whole grain starch, several vegetables, etc... seems like it would mostly cover it for most people. It would be useful (if it isn't there already, and I kind of think it might be) to note the cold climate Vitamin C sources, like cabbage and Aronia.

Just IMHO.

Sharon
 

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I agree totally--

We came across some really great information that I'm working up into a matrix to get people started for basic nutrition amounts for a typical homesteading arrangement, (nothing too exotic...partly to prove a point to myself that you don't have to go exotic to get healthy)...and then give some of the great sources you all are providing. Again, space is the biggest concern, as is redundancy--I hope that what I submit will fit both requirements.

We live as basically as we can -- no processed foods, adding foods strong in iron and so on, because last year I came up iron deficient to the point of pernicious anemia. Apparently my body never recovered from my 2nd child. I used to have 'too much' iron, and then one day I got rejected for blood donation--what a blow. So we try to get iron where ever we can....and for the time being I take iron pills in a perscription.

and then my DH turns up with low iron *this* year. Too weird. Especially for two, healthy adults. So he too is on iron for a while.

Which is the impetus for the project...

Jeanne
 

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How to buy at an auction page 43 rated 5
It literally explains everything there is to know about buying at an auction. I read this before going alone to an auction last week. Before I let my husband handle it all

metric weights page 48-49 rated 4
I looked all over for clear, concise charts not realizing that they were in the book. will you be adding imperial too?
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Yes, Greg is converting into both metric and Imperial and I'm adding both. Actually, the big statistics section is the 12th chapter, titled "Definitions and Measures." It was in older editions of the book. Sasquatch dropped it. I'm bringing it back for the 10th in an enlarged and advanced version. So far I haven't passed it out to any testers, but I will eventually.
Printed and tallied to date.
Gratefully,
Carla
 
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