Ceiling problems

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Grandmotherbear, Apr 16, 2005.

  1. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I seem to be cursed with ideas that sound good and don't work out too well. We have this cabin on the lake we inherited from the ILs. It is a nice, small aged cinderblock structure. When FIL remodeled the place in 1984, he turned the screened porch into a sunroom- it open to the LR and kitchen, mostly windowed walls. There were ceiling tiles up in that part of the house. The rest of the house's ceiling is stuccoed. After the trees immediately to the west and east died, we noticed the house was awfully hot in the summer and cold in the winter. We insulated the attic (which had not one bit of insulation!) but discovered this sunroom area attic space- round about a foot tall- didn't communicate to the attic of the main house. Some squirrels got in and chewed holesin the ceiling tiles. After getting rid of the squirrels and discovering there was nothing but space between the ceiling tiles and the roofin that part of the house, , I got the brilliant idea to insulate the sunroom attic space. We hired a handyman in late 2003. I was proud that the house wasn't quite as frigid that winter (still could feel the drafts rolling off the windows. Another story) Then we got 3 hurricanes in 2004.

    During Jeanne, the ceiling tiles in the sunroom came down. Near as I could figure, the wind came in the soffits and had no where to go. Thank GOODNESS that space didn't communicate to our main attic- we might have lost our roof.

    We hired a different handyman and he put up new ceiling tiles last month. Two weekends ago we had thunderstorms and wind and the ceiling came down again.

    This area has ALWAYS had thunderstorms and winds. My FIL's installed ceiling tiles lasted from 1984 to 2003/ The only thing that really changed is the insulation under the wooden slats criss crossing the "attic" space.

    Any ideas what I can do to !1. Have a ceiling that stays put and 2. Will not serve as a heat or cold drain for our heating and airconditioning?? Any suggestions would be appreciated!
     
  2. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    Do you have any evidence that would indicate why they came down? Condensation? watermarks? Its hard to imagine that wind blowing in soffitt holes would push out the ceilling tiles. Is this a drop in cieling?
     

  3. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Could it be that the trees that came down were blocking the wind from that roof? What kind of roofing is on it? Maybe something that the wind can push water under in a bad blow?
     
  4. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What's a drop in ceiling?
    There is the underside of the roof, a space, and a criss cross of slats to attach the ceiling tiles to. They were stapled in with a staple gun/ The staples stayed behind n the slats.
     
  5. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    You are describing a drop ceiling. I too doubt that wind up the soffits is the problem here. I think the problem will turn out to be moisture from somewhere. Assuming it is properly vented with soffit vents, it's unlikely to be a condensation issue, more likley a leak in the roofing material itself, causing your ceiling tiles to fail.
     
  6. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Killer migraine from early Tuesday morning to early Wed morning and I had to go to work this morning- which is why this is delayed. We checked the insulation and the tiles before returning to the city. They are dry, no staining which would indicate a leak.

    I KNOW it was wind from Jeanne which brought them down the first time- we felt it sweep down through the room as the tiles began to fall! However, don't know what actually caused the fall the second time- it fell between weekends. But we had thunderstorms w/40 mph gusts while we were gone (according to the Weather channel).
    However, we did notice the batts are sagging. New thought- the weight of the batts is too heavy for the tiles. Solution- find something lighter than the batts of fibreglass- either foam? or panel, cut into strips? If we stick some of the panel insulation up there, there will still be air space between the roof and the insulation/ceiling tiles- will that heat excessively ?
    I googled light weight insulation and got too many assorted hits on everything BUT what I was looking for to wade thru it right now....time to take another couple ibuprofen the migraine wants to come back....
     
  7. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    I don't think your bats would be too heavy for tiles. If wind pressure is sufficient to push out tiles then I think you have too much air in there.
    The diagnosis is important.


    One think you might consider is putting thick spray insulation under the roof. You get about an R7 per inch and it should'nt sweat.