ceiling fans...

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by millipede, Jun 13, 2006.

  1. millipede

    millipede quack...

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    first post here. I administer 3 forums so i feel like I'm spreading myself thin. Hard to keep up with so many sites no matter how useful they are. Hopefully I'll have some usefullness to add here with the little time I do get to participate...

    On to my question...
    Trying to keep the thermostat set high enough to save some energy but at the right temperature so we don't have to melt, I decided a ceiling fan would help.
    I went to the store and started looking at all the fans. Every single one said that most light fixtures do not accept fans and they must be acceptable for fan use. Anything else and you'd need an electrician.
    Well, I really wanted a fan, so we got one. This is a fairly new doublewide manufactured home... based on the fact that every single light fixture wont take more than a 60watt bulb I figured it would accept a fan. So I put off opening the box for a few days. I figured I'd get around to calling an electrician sooner or later.
    Well, one day I decided to open up the light fixture. What did I see? A sticker that said "acceptable for fan use". I was SO happy. installed the fan that evening with no problems whatsoever. This was our living room.
    I decided I really wanted one in the bedroom. So back to the store. Picked out a new fan, and back home. Opened the light fixture and right away I knew it wouldn't work. Everything was different, and there was no friendly sticker up there. So, I was a bit disappointed. The fixture is not acceptable. They have to be mounted correctly and be able to support at least 35 pounds(according to some of the boxes I read).
    well, I'm not entirely sure this fixture is in the right spot for me anyway, but to move it would mean there'd be an extra hole in the ceiling... not to mention there is no access to the space above the ceiling.
    So, I'm curious. Am I stuck either giving up or calling an electrician? Or is putting in a new fixture something I can do myself? I'm fairly handy and can follow directions quite well, but I do know some things are best left to the professionals. Any thoughts are welcome.
     
  2. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    The big deal is to have either the metal arm supports (supplied with some fans) or a 2x4 stud between your trusses/joists with a metal junction box to support the weight. It's easy enough if you know how to do drywall work. Some of the fans have a screw in mount that goes at an angle that you can mount right to a rafter if you have access to one, but then you have to run wiring to it.

    Here is a decent site on how to install it, if you feel comfortable opening up your hole and replacing your junction box with the correct one. The wiring is pretty simple.

    http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=howTo&p=Improve/InstallCeilingFan.html

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]


    PS, I absolutely love our ceiling fans especially in our kitchen above the iisland.
     

  3. tiogacounty

    tiogacounty Well-Known Member

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    There should be no need to disturb the drywall. There is a fan support rated box and bracket assembly that is designed to be installed in an existing opening. Most standard boxes are plastic and attached with a pair of built in nails. The first step is to turn the power off at the breaker. Now try to pry the box off the truss a bit with a pry bar or chisel. You only need enough room to get a hacksaw blade in the gap. Take a hacksaw blade and carefully cut the nails flush with the wood. If you have a box that was supported by a metal cross bar you are in better shape. Just unscrew the screws from the center of the box and take everything apart. The new box assembly has a sturdy metal bracket that is hammered into the trusses from the hole. It's easier than it sounds and works great. Good luck
     
  4. Claudia in NY

    Claudia in NY Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to try and politely hijack this thread! Since you guys who answered this post seem to know what your talking about...our ceiling fans are running very slow. There's not much difference between high and low. I'm thinking WD-40 but where do I want to aim...from the top of the unit or under or just spray the whole darn thing? one more thing...in the summer do I want it turning clockwise or counterclockwise? thanks in advance for all your help.
     
  5. vicker

    vicker Well-Known Member

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    In the summer, you want it to blow down. Up for winter. :)
     
  6. Rickstir

    Rickstir Well-Known Member

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    Get one with 5 blades. They move more air for not much more money.
     
  7. ninny

    ninny Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't use WD-40 on the fan bearings. Fan bearings need to be oiled with something like 3-in-1 oil or a graphite lubricant. WD-40 is for parts like hinges and slower moving parts or rusted parts that need a penetrant. You'll notice on the can that it doesn't say use to lubricate "bearings".
     
  8. millipede

    millipede quack...

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    Sorry I have not been back to this topic in so long.
    I still have not gone to get the box I need. I do plan on it though.
    Have another question about that... I believe the fan boxes recommended having an electrician do this sort of thing... now, installing a new fixture can't be that hard, and I'm good with directions... but is the wiring that is already in the celing for the light acceptable for use with a fan? I mean, do they carry the correct amount of power? or anything like that I need to know?
    Thanks again for the help.
     
  9. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    The wiring there will be fine. They say get an electrician because their lawyers tell them to say that. Its usually just a matter of puttiing on a couple of wire nuts and being able to tell black from white
     
  10. BobK

    BobK Well-Known Member

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    first I would suggest not doing any hammering on a remodel of this type...that tends to break loose the mud on tape joints and nails. What you could do and I would recommend is getting a support arm for the ceiling fan. Once you remove the existing electrical box this support bracket feeds up through the hole and you use a nut on the support bracket to extend each side of the bracket into each of the adjacent ceiling joists. Finish by tightening with a wrench and this will secure the support arm into the joists and safely support your fan...and no hammering involved. After that is installed reinstall the box to the bracket (it should come with a new box) and hook up the light....and turn off the power before you start!