Cattle Panels/Hog Panels/Combo - What is the diff??

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Wannabee, Feb 10, 2005.

  1. Wannabee

    Wannabee Foggy Dew Farms

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    Ok, for the first time in my life I am about to make the livestock plunge. We are starting off with two in-bred sheep that we are going to fatten and kill. Next year I might get a calf, maybe a goat, maybe even eventually a hog or two. If I am going to set the fencing up so that I only have one type of animal at a time, what is the best way to do it? COmbo panels?? Will cattle panels work? Will hog panels work for sheep and goats, too??? What do I need to look at here....I am sure I am missing SOMETHING, but if they are all 4' high and 16' long, does the size of the opening really matter??????????
     
  2. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    Cattle Panels are taller than Hog Panels.

    Cattle panels would be better for your animals..more likely to keep your livestock from going over the top of it.
     

  3. whiterock

    whiterock Well-Known Member Supporter

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    combo panels have smaller spacing on the bottom.
     
  4. milkstoolcowboy

    milkstoolcowboy Farmer

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    Cattle panels are 16' long by 52" high and the check size is roughly 5.75" by 8".

    Hog panels are 16' long by 34" high with a narrower height on the check, particularly at the bottom of the panel.

    I think both cattle and hog panels are around $15-$17/panel new depending on where you look.

    Combo panels are 16' long by 52" high and the check size is much narrower at the bottom and then has a higher check height about half way up the panel. About $20-$22/panel. Check farm sales for used panels, I've never been to a farm sale that didn't have some.

    Make a good temp fence but if using them for permanent fencing I'd set wooden posts at least every 8' (every four feet would be better and I'd run 2" by 6" along the top to keep them from getting bowed down. I've seen people use them as a frame for hoop structures as well.

    They don't make them like they used to. A steer will wrinkle one pretty easily. I must have a couple hundred stacked up in a storage shed. When I don't have anything else to do, I'll try to straighten them by laying them flat, walking and or driving ont them, cutting off particularly bent sections.
     
  5. Wannabee

    Wannabee Foggy Dew Farms

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  6. milkstoolcowboy

    milkstoolcowboy Farmer

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    I try to stay as far away from sheep as possible, but I would reckon that some sheep could easily clear a hog panel. I'll leave the sheep fencing ?s to others.

    The combo panels will limit the ability of sows to put their snouts through the check and lift on the panel. (Unless they are rung, though, it's not going to prevent them from rooting underneath the panel.) Depending on the type of sheep or goat, I reckon the combo panel will limit their ability to reach through toward the bottom.

    A combo panel will keep in little pigs whereas the wider check on the bottom of the cattle panel will allow them to pass right through.

    Also, some of your smaller dog breeds can get right through that larger check -- might be an issue if you want to keep dogs out of the pen or lot.